Create WebM Videos With Miro Video Converter - gHacks Tech News

Create WebM Videos With Miro Video Converter

WebM could become the next big thing on the Internet, at least when it comes to HTML5 video. It is the format that is backed up by the majority of browser developers (four out of the five big developers have pledged to support it) and could become the de facto standard for web video in the future.

This obviously makes things interesting from a end user perspective as well. Users should make sure that not only their web browser but also their favorite media player can play WebM videos.

But how can producers convert their videos into the WebM format?

Miro Video Converter is one of the first video converters that can convert media into the WebM format.

The converter is Open source and available for Windows and Mac OSX. The program is a basic video converter, something that we have criticized in the initial review of Miro Video Converter back in April.

Its simplicity makes it on the other hand easy to use and with support for WebM videos added it could snag some market share from other video converters.

webm video

All that needs to be done by the user is to select the output format (WebM in this case) and drag and drop the video into the program interface.

Miro Video Converter will take care of the rest. The program is missing a queue to make it more comfortable converting multiple videos. The converter uses FFMPEG to convert the videos.

The result is a video in the .webm format that uses considerably less hard drive space. A test avi with a file size of 36 Megabytes was reduced to an 11 Megabyte webm video.

It is likely that other video converter developers will add support for webm conversions in the near future as well. If you know of a converter that is already supporting webm let us know in the comments.

Miro Video Converter can be downloaded from the official website for Windows and Mac computers.

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Comments

  1. 123456 said on May 22, 2010 at 5:30 pm
    Reply

    That is total bollocks!
    WebM is just a container for google proprietary vp8-codec, which they bought from on2 in February 2010.
    And since it is not under any free license, everybody player has to pay the fees.
    As for html5… it will not be anything different than, lets say, an AVI.
    The browser will still have to fall back on a plugin or an installed player…

    1. Anonymous said on May 22, 2010 at 10:00 pm
      Reply

      completely false – everything is free software and royalty free
      (see: http://www.webmproject.org/about/faq/#licensing )

  2. Monarky said on May 31, 2010 at 4:23 pm
    Reply

    @123456 A bollocks Brit…… eh? Well bugger off twit!!!
    WebM is most likely going to be the W3C HTML5 Standard. Google bought it and is converting all HD videos to .webm right now. Which will make it the most widely distributed format on the web! All browser except Safari have signed on to support it.

    Newest Mega Codec Pack now has support included as of May 25, ’10

    The problem is the simplicity of Miro is it’s worst drawback, only supporting ridiculously low quality video that plays worse than the lowest quality FLV! …..until they make it configurable, it ain’t going anywhere! ;)

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