Microsoft pushes out KB4023057 again to enforce Windows 10 upgrades - gHacks Tech News

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Microsoft pushes out KB4023057 again to enforce Windows 10 upgrades

Windows 10 users who run consumer versions of the operating system and want to stay on a particular version of Windows 10 that is not the recent version, may want to avoid the recently re-released update KB4023057.

The update is provided for the majority of Windows 10 versions that Microsoft released over the years starting with Windows 10 version 1507 and going up to Windows 10 version 1909 at the time of writing.

KB4023057 is re-issued regularly by Microsoft. Microsoft explains that the update "includes reliability improvements to Windows Update Service components in consumer Windows 10 versions", and that it "includes files and resources that address issues that affect the update processes in Windows 10 that may prevent important Windows updates from being installed".

windows 10 kb4023057 update

While that sounds good on paper and may be useful to Home users who want to upgrade but are stuck somehow, it poses a problem to users who don't want their systems to be upgraded at that point.

The main issue from that point of view is that the update may change the system's settings in regards to the installation of automatic updates. In other words, if you have configured Windows 10 to block the automatic installation of updates, this update will undo the changes and you end up getting all updates pushed to the system and installed.

The update description highlights the fact, but it is rather vague as it does not provide details on the actual changes that are made to the system:

This update may try to reset network settings if problems are detected, and it will clean up registry keys that may be preventing updates from being installed successfully.

Windows 10 administrators who don't want their devices to be upgraded need to block the update from being installed; this can be done in a number of ways including hiding the update using Wushowhide.diagcab which can be downloaded from Microsoft, update blockers like Windows Update Blocker by Sordum, or by using this -- lengthy -- method suggested on the Ask Woody forum.

Closing Words

The patch may help on systems that somehow cannot be upgraded to the latest version of Windows 10, e.g. if there is not enough free disk space or if update settings prevent the installation. Admins who don't want their devices to be upgraded at this point need to avoid the update at all costs as it will upgrade the system automatically if it gets installed. (via Ask Woody)

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Microsoft pushes out KB4023057 again to enforce Windows 10 upgrades
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Microsoft pushes out KB4023057 again to enforce Windows 10 upgrades
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Windows 10 users who run consumer versions of the operating system and want to stay on a particular version of Windows 10 that is not the recent version, may want to avoid the recently re-released update KB4023057.
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Comments

  1. Mystique said on August 29, 2020 at 10:14 am
    Reply

    Yes because updating to the latest version of windows 10 means absolute stability! :rollseyes:
    I couldn’t roll my eyes hard enough at this.

  2. Yuliya said on August 29, 2020 at 11:55 am
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    Good. If you use SAC you should be on 2004; everything else is obsolete.

  3. some1 said on August 29, 2020 at 12:29 pm
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    Setting Target Feature Update Version group policy/registry prevents this.

  4. Klaas Vaak said on August 29, 2020 at 1:10 pm
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    It is hard to understand why so many people stay with Windows and M$’s bullying, when there is plenty of choice out there.

    M$ is only interested in business users as that’s where the money is, whereas home users are only a PITA for M$.

    So, since the parties don’t like each other, it seems to me it’s high time home users start ditching M$.

    1. Yuliya said on August 29, 2020 at 1:36 pm
      Reply

      There is no better OS than LTSC. And LTSC is a really good OS, a true successor to Windows 7. It runs all my programs and games, hardware compatibility is excellent, power management is fantastic (on Linux the power management is attrocious, especially if you’re on a mobile device like a laptop or a tablet where evereything heats up to the point of fans spinning at their fastest speed while the mahine is idling on desktop), everything is familiar so if you know how an OS like XP or 7 works then you know your way around LTSC as well, it behaves predictably (I never managed to get mouse acceleration disabled on any Linux environment, the user-facing option does nothing but to alternate between two different algorithms by the way I’m feeling it). I never managed to get my mouse, which is currently running at 1600 CPI behave in Linux the same way it does on Windows, I always overshoot for things and slowing it down just makes it too slow.

      LTSC works, flawlessly.

      The only one to blame or for subjecting themselves to SAC is the end-user.

      1. Klaas Vaak said on August 29, 2020 at 2:28 pm
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        @Yuliya: if by LTSC you mean Windows Long Term Service Channel, then one is still bound to M$. I don’t know how that works, but even if it is fine now, sooner or later it will need to be updated, with all the M$ shenanigans that involves.

        As for it being reminiscent of XP or 7, to me that is a negative. I know those were M$’s most popular and stable Win versions, but they are obsolete, and sooner or later they will be so antique as to be a collectors’ item only.

      2. Yuliya said on August 29, 2020 at 4:40 pm
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        Well, LTSC 1809 will be good for 10 years if the next LTSC is not to my taste. And to me that is enough not to stress too much about the future of (my) computing right now.

      3. Iron Heart said on August 29, 2020 at 10:12 pm
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        @Klaas Vaak

        LTSC is just as bad as any other Windows 10 version, updates for it are just as likely to break things as any other Windows 10 update. MS is patching critical components in Windows 10 LTSC, too. Needless to say, no QA team involved. Yuliya is just bullshitting here (groundhog day).

      4. Klaas Vaak said on August 30, 2020 at 3:53 am
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        @Iron Heart: hiya, good to hear from ya!

        Yes, if it’s Windows in whatever form or disguise, it is a nightmare. That’s why I ditched it and went to Linux, and now Mac (an indulgence).

        That’s also why I mentioned Linux because most of the distros are free, and Linux, IMO, has come of age and is a feasible proposition for beginners as well as geeks.

      5. Rob.G said on September 1, 2020 at 10:59 am
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        @Klaas Vaak

        “Linux IMO, has come of age and is a feasible proposition for beginners as well as geeks”.

        Please …whenever you recommend Linux to anyone, please also point out that it simply will not run well on many laptops ..as the fans running constantly on full…and high CPU usage also.

        I once swallowed the Linux ‘pitch’ and completely formatted a top-end HP laptop to get away from Windows altogether..only to find the above mentioned problems made the laptop unusable. I had previously booted Linux from a USB stick as a test, and it ran fine, until I actually installed it. Now I have a perfectly good HP laptop but with no operating system and no recovery partition…and no version of Linux will run stable on it…and no supposed fix from the Linux forums works either.

        ‘Linux makes laptops overheat and high cpu’

        https://www.google.com/search?q=linux+makes+laptops+overheat+and+high+cpu&oq=linux+makes+laptops+overheat+and+high+cpu&aqs=chrome..69i57.13596j0j0&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

      6. poor said on August 29, 2020 at 4:44 pm
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        Is there any way to get LTSC at the price of Win 10 Home?

      7. Klaas Vaak said on August 29, 2020 at 6:58 pm
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        Or at the price of a Linux distro?

      8. ULBoom said on August 30, 2020 at 6:22 am
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        @poor
        You need a Win 10 Volume License to get it. There are Educational and Enterprise versions and an IoT version. Good Luck with that.

        Win 10 Pro is great for individuals, legal, too. Learn gpedit and some other tricks and you’ll be in a better place; the features removed from LTSC, B and hardware support remain intact in Pro.

        Or buy LTSwhatever on ebay.

        Home’s an ad server, pure junk. Get Pro, the difference is huge after a hundred or so settings are changed.

      9. Iron Heart said on August 29, 2020 at 10:08 pm
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        > There is no better OS than LTSC.

        I see you are poor and can‘t afford a Mac. macOS >>>>>>>>>> Windows 10, any incarnation.

      10. Peterc said on August 29, 2020 at 11:44 pm
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        @Yuliya:

        Okay, Yuliya — it’s time to stop being coy. How *did* you get your legal LTSC licenses? Are they “OEM upgrade” licenses that are tied to a specific machine (~$280 to ~$305 per license in the US, depending on the Microsoft Partner). Are they retail licenses that you can move to a different machine? Did you negotiate a low-seat-count volume license with a Microsoft Partner? Are they employee perks from a company with a more standard high-seat-count volume license? Did you get them from the Microsoft Company Store? Inquiring minds want to know! ;-)

    2. Peterc said on August 29, 2020 at 11:25 pm
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      @Klaas Vaak:

      “[H]ome users are only a PITA for M$.”

      Nonsense! Microsoft values its home users *highly* … as unpaid beta testers. In fact, through the passed-on bundled OEM licensing fee, they’re actually *paying* for the privilege! Normally, I’d throw in a winking smiley, but I can’t because it’s *true*!

      As for why everyone doesn’t ditch Windows Home for Linux pronto, a lot of it is ignorance, inertia, and FUD. That said, Yuliya does have some valid points.

      I’m working on a new laptop with very recent hardware now, and while I will be adding at least one Linux distro alongside the bundled Windows 10 Home in the near future, I *do* have concerns about heat management / fan life and power management / battery life. (I’m not counting on the fingerprint reader *ever* being supported in Linux, but that’s a minor concern. It is pretty cool, though!)

      I can’t speak directly to the mouse acceleration problems Yuliya brought up because I’ve always used a pointing stick (TrackPoint) in Linux. But I *can* say that as obscure and poorly documented as TrackPoint customization is in Windows, it seems to be *nonexistent* in Linux. (I believe this is the result of Synaptics keeping their proprietary APIs as secret as possible.) One practical consequence of this is that you can customize the TrackPoint to do horizontal scrolling in LibreOffice Calc in Windows but you *can’t* in Linux — a somewhat major usability drawback.

      And of course, there are still some Windows-only programs that simply don’t have adequate substitutes in Linux. For me, the big ones are [Search] Everything (unrivaled in speed), MediaMonkey (which I use for tagging MP4s), and Macrium Reflect (which can image or clone a system while it’s running). If I still cared as much about guitar playing as I once did, I’d probably add Guitar Pro 7 to the list. And there are probably a few other also-rans.

      Don’t get me wrong. I’m not yet as resigned to perpetual Linux inferiority as Dedoimedo has become, and — how to put this politely? — I’m not *remotely* a fan of Microsoft’s business practices. I don’t like giving up control over my system and my privacy, and I still intend to move to Linux as primary OS on the new laptop. It’s just that there *are* in fact some real-world drawbacks. I’m hoping I can live with them.

      As for Macs, they have their own set of issues, including notably that Apple has repeatedly had to be dragged kicking and screaming to remedy hardware problems that are clearly their fault. Let’s put it this way: my brother is a software architect who has used Macbook Pros for the past ten years, and he’s on the verge of switching to Windows 10 on non-Apple hardware. He has just had too much trouble getting Apple hardware problems acknowledged and addressed … and the odd iPhone and Macbook getting bricked by a software update didn’t help, either. I don’t doubt that bad updates are less frequent in the Apple world, but they *do* happen.

      1. Klaas Vaak said on August 30, 2020 at 8:53 am
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        @Peterc: hi there, long time no speak.

        What you have basically stated here, in a long, roundabout way, is that no system is perfect. And guess, it can even be extended to just about everything else in life.

        Starting from there, one can look at computers as having to choose the least bad system of a bad bunch, but I think that is a cynical, defeatist approach.

        A lot of one’s choice also has to do with one’s experience with one or various computer systems. Last time I was on Windows was with 8.1, a version that got a lot of stick but which for me, like Win 98, worked fine, no major complaints.

        When I saw M$’s handling of Win 10, such as its major problems and they way they were handled amateurishly, and also how telemetry became a major feature, as well as the impossibility to turn off updates, I decided to ditch it.

        I said elsewhere on this page I moved to Linux (you and I had various exchanges) and did not regret it. I moved on to Mac (Macbook Air) for “spoilt brat” reasons, and have not regretted it so far. That said, my Mac came with macOS 10.14 (Mojave), and when Catalina came out I was tempted, but Apple made a balls-up of it so I stayed with Mojave, and am proud of my wise decision. Big Sur will be released soon – a major upgrade – and will I move? Not sure, let Apple prove it’s worth it.

        As for your claim

        Microsoft values its home users *highly* … as unpaid beta testers. In fact, through the passed-on bundled OEM licensing fee, they’re actually *paying* for the privilege!

        I think you’ve got your knickers in a twist. That fee is paid for by the home user when they buy the computer, so they are actually paying M$ for the privilege of being a guinea pig !! M$ has got the home user over a barrel, screwed thoroughly.

      2. Peterc said on September 1, 2020 at 9:14 am
        Reply

        @Klaas Vaak: Hold your horses, there, pard! On *this* side of the pond we don’t *get* our knickers in a twist. We get our *panties* in a *bunch*. ;-)

        But seriously, what you said is exactly what I meant, namely that it’s the *home users* who pay *Microsoft* for the privilege of being beta testers. I suppose I could have written it less ambiguously.

    3. vanp said on August 30, 2020 at 1:02 am
      Reply

      “when there is plenty of choice out there.”?

      Wanna give us a list? Thanks.

      1. Klaas Vaak said on August 30, 2020 at 3:55 am
        Reply

        @vanp: sure, the Linux distros, such as Ubuntu, or Mint, or Artix, or ……. You’ll have to do your own research because there is so much.

        Start experimenting in a Virtual Machine before a bare metal install.
        Good luck, and keep smiling, it really isn’t difficult.

  5. owl said on August 29, 2020 at 2:18 pm
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    Nearly 90% of Windows 10 users continue to use older builds without updating.

    According to statcounter, a web traffic analytics company, Windows OS had 77.74% market share as of July 2020.
    https://gs.statcounter.com/os-market-share/desktop/worldwide
    It is known that only about 10% of the people have installed the latest Windows 10 May 2020 Update (version 2004).
    https://reports.adduplex.com/#/r/2020-07
    Maybe Microsoft wants to forcefully break the current situation where build updates aren’t progressing (denied to apply updates).
    By the way,
    I am refusing to upgrade after “Windows 10 (x64) version 1903 (build 18362.1016)”.
    https://www.ghacks.net/2020/07/24/microsoft-installs-windows-10-version-2004-on-more-devices-automatically/#comment-4468901
    https://www.ghacks.net/2020/07/24/windows-10-telemetry-new-control-option-for-enterprise-customers-launches/#comment-4468912

    1. Klaas Vaak said on August 29, 2020 at 7:00 pm
      Reply

      @owl: oh? I thought M$ had taken that option away: one can delay for a certain time but beyond that it is forced down one’s throat?

      1. ULBoom said on August 30, 2020 at 6:38 am
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        @Klaas Vaak

        Updates can be delayed repeatedly using Settings off line. Not sure how many times, at least three. Or the Target Release Version registry tweak or gp addition.

        You still have a good OS buried under layers of crapware and spyware managed by a bunch of fools who care naught about consumers.

        Ubuntu’s working great for us, I just hate the gnome desktop but have gone around it with extensions. Maybe this winter Windows will be dead here. Too much to do while it’s warm.

      2. Klaas Vaak said on August 30, 2020 at 5:40 pm
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        @ULBoom: delayed still means sooner or later the use will have to swallow them. In other words, there is no real choice.

        The OS underneath might good (that’s a view), but that does not mean M$ cares for or listens to home users. Although it has not stated it explicitly, M$ is clearly not in that business anymore.

      3. PJL said on August 31, 2020 at 1:50 pm
        Reply

        I foolishly accepted the “Free Upgrade” to W10 Home on my laptop.

        I’m still on 1704, as it kept failing to perform the 1709 “Upgrade”.
        I just keep the Network disconnected, no more updates and it runs OK.
        I also Have Linux Mint 18.3 MATE on it.

        MY W10 Pro VM is still on 1704, as it also repeatedly failed to “Upgrade”.
        In that case, it kept failing and downloading the update, until it had filled the VHD with broken copies.
        I just keep the Network disconnected, no more updates and it runs OK.

      4. PJL said on August 31, 2020 at 1:55 pm
        Reply

        Oops!
        That should be 1703, not 1704.

  6. win10 said on August 29, 2020 at 4:39 pm
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    @Yulia

    2004 defragments SSDs instead of trimming them and everything from 1903 up has microstutter in games.

    1809 is the last usable Windows 10 version. MS should move to a Debian-like cadence, as they are clearly unable to release stable feature updates.

    1. Yuliya said on August 29, 2020 at 11:53 pm
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      Hey, I just tested on an old machine with an nForce 730i chipset (Intel CPU and SATA2 controller). Windows 10 2004 running off a Samsung 860 EVO recognises it as an SSD and only trims it from within “Defragment and Optimize Drives”, which is the expected behaviour.

      I assume that machine might have some driver conflicts or BIOS misconfiguration.

      SAC is terrible, by any means, but this does not seem to be broken on my end.

    2. pdp10 said on August 30, 2020 at 12:20 am
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      Completely false, it only fails to keep the last optimized time so your drives always appear to have “never run”. This may lead to drives being trimmed daily rather than weekly, which is not a major issue. Some people *already* did daily trimming because trims theoretically keep the drive running at peak speed.

      It’s a minor bug that got blown out of proportion by people who should have known better than to call it defrag.

    3. Mikhoul said on August 30, 2020 at 2:13 am
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      Fixed in windows10.0-kb4571744-x64_B6E6AF8DCFE47947C5D2C44BA3E1FE7B8BB52441.cab

  7. Tony said on August 29, 2020 at 5:26 pm
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    As an IT support person, I see a lot of times where Windows updater just fails to initiate updates in the first place. It would be nice for Microsoft to create an optional, Windows Update system that worked correctly at least most of the time.

    Personally, I block updates on my home computer. They are proving that they cannot develop without a QA team and I have no interest in applying buggy updates. I just stick with the feature updates.

    1. owl said on August 30, 2020 at 12:29 am
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      @Tony: It would be nice for Microsoft to create an optional, Windows Update system that worked correctly at least most of the time.
      Personally, I block updates on my home computer. They are proving that they cannot develop without a QA team and I have no interest in applying buggy updates. I just stick with the feature updates.

      Share your views
      https://www.ghacks.net/2020/07/23/there-are-only-a-few-reasons-to-install-windows-10-update-previews/#comment-4468770

  8. Hiram said on August 30, 2020 at 2:00 am
    Reply

    Ever week you need to:
    – Block some update from them.
    – Tweak something on Registry.
    – Tweak something on Administrative Groups.
    – Block another stream of telemetry coming from some strange executable.

    Ad nauseam. I’m stuck with W7 and probably will be the last from M$, I doubt they will make another OS better than W10, they are clearly moving to the cloud-based model where you don’t own a computer, but only a thin client to login to the cloud.

  9. ForTheLastTime said on August 30, 2020 at 2:38 am
    Reply

    Blah blah blah. Blah Blah Blah. BLAH BLAH BLAH!
    Yadda yadda yadda……………..
    If you don’t like it, don’t use it.
    Move on with your lives.
    Gawd.

    1. Klaas Vaak said on August 30, 2020 at 8:57 am
      Reply

      @ForTheLastTime: why should people not discuss their experiences, good and bad one?

      If you don’t like it, don’t use it.

      can easily be answered with:

      If you don’t like the comments, son’t read them.

  10. lux said on August 31, 2020 at 8:03 am
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    Still on windows XP :P
    Dual boot Linux Mint 20.

    Will never use another Eugenics$oft product again.

  11. John G. said on August 31, 2020 at 6:03 pm
    Reply

    After this update my sister’s computer enables itself the airplane mode and all WiFi connection is lost with no even a single explanation to recover it. The only way to restore normal internet usability was to enable a restore-point of copy of security or whatever it names in english. What an amazing piece of crap, I have no bad words enough to describe my sister’s fury against this OS.

    1. John G. said on September 2, 2020 at 12:21 am
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      I reply myself to give more interesting info about some weird issues after installing this KB4023057! Be careful before to install this update, no info from Microsoft is given anyway. :(
      “Tonight it installed KB4023057. Now my system is freezing after about 20min of usage or anytime I try to have more than 1 app or webpage open. The system process is using 100% of my hard drive and I have 32 svchost.exe running. I disabled updates again in services and rebooted. I checked services after I rebooted to confirm it was still disabled.”
      https://www.windowsphoneinfo.com/threads/how-to-disable-windows-updates-permanently.86757/

  12. Anonymous said on August 31, 2020 at 7:52 pm
    Reply

    Windows 10 is ruined with all the modern garbage. Glad I still use Windows 7 with Extended Security Updates. I don’t have to deal with any of Microsoft’s BS! No forced unwanted nonsense. Windows 7 is the last version build for user control and privacy.

    1. Clas said on September 11, 2020 at 6:41 pm
      Reply

      yeah, dont give up on 7, anonymous, i also still use it and everything works and its smooth as silk, never a problem. run sandboxed all the time as does the wife…both boxes work great. no updates, sandboxed, make an image once a week….zero problems. let the others have their issues…. its fun, however, to read about all the issues and problems going on constantly.

  13. JohnIL said on August 31, 2020 at 11:21 pm
    Reply

    I have mostly had good experiences on my devices with Windows 10. But I have not been one to install day one of release preferring to wait for the dust to settle. I like the ability to pause upgrades and definitely like that Microsoft blocks upgrades when something is detected that will be a conflict. With such a vast device ecosystem this should have happened much earlier in Windows 10. I think skipping every other upgrade makes sense. The Spring one is most buggy and by Fall you get the fixes.

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