What will Ubuntu 10.04 bring to the table? - gHacks Tech News

What will Ubuntu 10.04 bring to the table?

It's almost that time again - time to start chatting up the next release coming out of the Ubuntu-verse. I know, I know...it seems the tires of 9.10 were just kicked. They were. Ubuntu 9.10 was well received, but now something bigger and better is coming around the corner.

But what should be expected of Ubuntu? How can they one-up themselves, after the hat-trick they pulled with 9.10? Well, I have taken a peek under the hood of Lucid Lynx and I really liked what I saw.

As you may know, Ubuntu has a very regular release schedule. Some say this prolific schedule gets in the way of users growing accustomed to the distribution. The minute a release gains a modicum of familiarity, Ubuntu releases another, better version.

On the other hand, Ubuntu offers what is called a Long Term Support version. LTS releases happen every two years and enjoys support for 3 years. So instead of jumping on every release, you can upgrade only when an LTS release comes out. Ubuntu 10.04 is an LTS release (due out in April 2010), so users could hop onto this release and ride it until 12.04 is released. But what will 10.04 bring to the table? Let's find out.

New look

Even though GNOME 3 will not be released in time for 10.04, Lucid Lynx will be getting a major face lift. The Ayatana Team of Ubuntu developers are working on an enhanced version of GTK+ that will include RGBA support. What does this mean? You know that sleek Aero interface that Windows Vista and 7 used by default? A Linux take on that theme will be enabled, out of the box, for 10.04. If you are more visual, then take a look at Figure 1 for a reference. Upon first glance I would immediately say that theme could be taken care of with the help of a few Compiz and Emerald tweaks. It can. But this is out of the box goodness. This is not preferences hacking, this is out of the box, global transparency for all applications.  And this is transparency on the widget level - not border and window level.

Speed

Benchmarkings are out of the question as 10.04 is very much alpha. But word from Canonical is that coveted 10 second boot time just make make it to fruition. What they are doing differently this time is targeting a mid-range machine to reach the 10 second time. This will mean some machines will boot fast and some slower. The targeted machine: A Dell Mini 9 netbook. If they can get a netbook to boot in 10 seconds, imagine how fast your quad core will boot!

Also along the lines of speed improvements is installation time. Ubuntu 10.04 will install (under the hood) a bit differently than previous versions. In earlier versions the install required downloads to occur first. Now downloads and installation will happen in parallels so to greatly shorting the installation time.

Startup/Shutdown

One nice feature that was planned for 9.10 (but didn't make it) is the ability to install updates at shutdown. Another nice feature proposal is a graphical OS selector for multi-boot machines. Instead of a text-based selection menu, you will have a GUI for the selection of your os too boot.

Ubuntu Software Center

When 10.04 releases, the Ubuntu Software Center will finally take over as the sole installation tool for Ubuntu. Synaptic, GDebi, and even the update manager will all be replaced by USC. Hopefully USC will include the ability to install more than one piece of software at a time.

Final thoughts

So far that's all that has been released for 10.04. But you can rest easily knowing that 10.04 will have to endure its 100 Papercuts before it reaches the public (it will go through 10 rounds of "healing"). I hope you are as excited about 10.04 as I am. I believe this could be the Ubuntu release that the public would have a hard time turning down as its desktop OS. Not only will it have a very solid foundation, the overlaying structure will be much more modern looking.

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What will Ubuntu 10.04 bring to the table?
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What will Ubuntu 10.04 bring to the table?
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But what should be expected of Ubuntu? How can they one-up themselves, after the hat-trick they pulled with 9.10? Well, I have taken a peek under the hood of Lucid Lynx and I really liked what I saw.
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Ghacks Technology News
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    Comments

    1. Mosh said on December 11, 2009 at 6:58 pm
      Reply

      I’ve still not got the wifi working on my laptop since I upgraded to 9.10. I think I’ll be looking at another distro this time around.

      1. jtso8 said on December 14, 2009 at 7:05 am
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        you have to plug your computer into the internet directly with a wire and up date it and then reinstall the drivers

    2. Adrian said on December 11, 2009 at 7:51 pm
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      As far as I see, nothing relevant. Desktop facelift, better graphics, graphics at boot time… Trying to copy Windows it’s really lame, if you ask me… I’d like to see less bleeding edge features, more stability and usability.

      1. chila said on December 11, 2009 at 10:33 pm
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        Adrian, If they wanted to copy Windows, they’d try to make an insecure OS, so an infite kind of malware can enter the system, and promote proprietary software, so you’ll have to pay for everything you need and all software will be developed in it’s own niche so they’ll be very bloated and ocupy all you hard drive, memory and cpu.
        Looking at what Ubuntu is I’ll say that they’re definitely no trying to copy Windows.

      2. dajomu said on December 14, 2009 at 1:45 pm
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        Then you should only stick to the LTS!

    3. Green.cx said on December 11, 2009 at 7:14 pm
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      OH LOOK!!! WIN7!!! Err I mean Ubuntu???

    4. Dave said on December 11, 2009 at 9:00 pm
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      I don’t want them to get rid of apt. Some of us don’t want to push the shiny buttons to get stuff done.

    5. chila said on December 11, 2009 at 10:31 pm
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      Adrian, If they wanted to copy Windows, they’d try to make an insecure OS, so an infite kind of malware can enter the system, and promote proprietary software, so you’ll have to pay for everything you need and all software will be developed in it’s own niche so they’ll be very bloated and ocupy all you hard drive, memory and cpu.
      Looking at what Ubuntu is I’ll say that they’re definitely no trying to copy Windows.

    6. Jack Wallen said on December 11, 2009 at 11:32 pm
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      @Dave: They won’t be getting rid of apt. You’ll still be able to install via command line. They can’t take that away.

    7. juan said on December 12, 2009 at 1:45 am
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      Why don’t you try really IMPORTANT things like HW support (scanners, tv tuners, hand held devices, office apps that don’t look like MS Office 95) no offense I am a big Linux/Ubuntu fan but those things are missing, why they spend so much effort in things like “transparency out of the box”?

    8. Genisis said on December 12, 2009 at 2:45 am
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      Will the ICS (internet connection sharing) be a reality this time around? Would love to get rid of my XP box that is used for the ICS only. I know they make a “server” version but I want the GUI.

      1. alexis said on December 15, 2009 at 2:17 am
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        If you want ICS on linux, use firestarter, it is a firewall app that allows you to share your internet connection. It works like a charm I used to use it with a USB DSL modem. On XP it would disconnect every hour or two, on linux the USB DSL connection stayed on forever and with firestarter I was able to share my connection and started using the computer as a server.

      2. crabbypup said on December 16, 2009 at 4:36 pm
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        i am running linux mint 8 (based on ubuntu 9.10) and i have been doing internet connection sharing for quite a while. i have installed the bridging protocol and just have the interface connected to my network set as ‘shared to other computers’. it allows many windows and linux machines to connect. i have no idea why you have so many problems, but it worked great for me.

    9. jack said on December 12, 2009 at 2:50 am
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      @juan: I agree with you. But these are the only details that have been released about 10.04. The more critical issues will come out soon.

    10. Womble said on December 12, 2009 at 3:07 am
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      Ubuntu appears to be going down the path of just working on things that make it attractive to new users, whilst this is important it is equally important to keep the house in order too.

      9.10 was a terrible release IMV it should never have left beta in that state.

      Feature freeze please lets have a solid release next.

    11. mrmcq2u said on December 12, 2009 at 6:59 am
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      The theme used in this article was not made by canonical nor will it be the default theme out of the box for lucid. RGBA might not make it in if there are too many bugs and it just allows theme developers to work with transparency within gtk themes.

    12. HellNoire said on December 13, 2009 at 1:45 am
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      Never EVER should they remove apt or Synaptic.

      They get much much more done then the Software Center ever does.

      If anything, they should remove the Software Center and put back in the old Add/Remove programs, as it was geared much more to power users.

      If you really need all the eye candy that you are trying to push onto us, IE no apt, no synaptic, build your own. I’m not going to be using Ubuntu anymore if they do.

    13. Shawn Patrick said on December 13, 2009 at 4:33 am
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      Here’s the thing. All ubuntu releases except for the LTS are beta releases. 9.10 was a piece of junk and it didn’t work with broadcom drivers out of the box when installed. 9.04, 8.10 and 8.04 didn’t have this problem. It’s a horrible regression and the forums are flooded with this error. There was no excuse for this.

      Here’s another thing. When Firefox 3.5 was released, ubuntu users were blocked out. Even now, you can’t download Firefox 3.5 via the download manager, you have to use symatic and use a Sharetoko version of it instead. That’s hogwash.

      I think they said they are going to work on getting 10.04 (why always a .04, why not just Ubuntu X or Ubuntu 10?) making it stable instead of new features.

      1. Shawn Patrick said on December 13, 2009 at 4:34 am
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        well I meant to say you can’t download Firefox 3.5 within Ubuntu 9.04 and earlier using the download manager. No excuse for canonical not to put in Firefox 3.5 into it’s repository for this releases, especially the 8.04 release which is supposed to be a LTS release.

      2. Kevin J. Wangler said on December 14, 2009 at 7:47 pm
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        The reason it’s 10.04 is that it comes out in April (04) of 2010 (10). All their releases are that way. 10.04 means April 2010, 10.10 will be October 2010, etc. It’s not the typical “dot-oh-four” numbering you’re thinking. It’s based on the release date. I find it handy, actually.

    14. ubuntu4life said on December 13, 2009 at 12:33 pm
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      I’m very exited !

      Can’t wait !

      “The future will be open.”

    15. amokk said on December 14, 2009 at 5:29 pm
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      Future of linux is one word: AUTOPACKAGE.

      Main distributions should integrate this system with package managers.

    16. Jim said on December 15, 2009 at 3:40 am
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      man….I am gonna miss Synaptic

    17. GuillaumzB said on December 15, 2009 at 1:40 pm
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      Nope, GNOME 3 has been postpone to Sept 2010
      http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.gnome.devel.announce/60

    18. rivas said on December 15, 2009 at 2:30 pm
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      People! You have to look for facts! apt will be under the hood when you use the software center, its the same with synaptics!. And you don’t have to miss synaptics neither. It will probably be on the repos, just not installed by default. Just install it using apt or the software center. It probably won’t be uninstalled if you upgrade from 9.10.

    19. Innocent Bystander said on December 15, 2009 at 7:24 pm
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      I want Stability, Speed, better Hardware support, easy file sharing, better usability (for example making Nautilus more usable like drag drop, edit on BOTH panes, more right click actions, etc.) Those are useful features.

      What is the good of seeing the windows below the current window by transparency? This is an annoying feature that should be considered last.

    20. Anonymous said on December 29, 2009 at 6:10 pm
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      that “New Look” looks like ass; I was looking forward to 10.04 until I saw that

    21. Goddard said on January 4, 2010 at 12:14 am
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      Two words: Ubuntu SUCKS ! ! !

    22. toro said on March 11, 2010 at 11:24 am
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      ubuntu 10.4 is bugshit, it cant compete with windows 7, and dont come with bullshit saying that its more insecure, get the facts straight and look at the security methods implemented in windows 7, its not like win xp anymore

    23. Needlez said on March 13, 2010 at 10:39 pm
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      Ok while i have to admit that windows 7 is nice and all id actually like to see this version of Linux kick its ass! Because i run a new i7 core computer in windows 7 and whats sad to say is its not got any issues at all!! But when i try to use 9.10 of Ubuntu i have horrible problems no support for my wifi, no support for my usb, no support for almost half my cpus. This is a major issue and i later found out its because the hardware i have is too new? how is that possible shouldnt linux be looking into newer, faster hardware and how to keep the stability of these new systems? If they dont who will? Do you really want to trust a nice new computer to a second rate OS like windows? I think not. It’d also be nice to still be able to use aircrack-ng with my computers built in realtek wifi card but i guess that will have to be another problem for another forum.

    24. dboy said on March 28, 2010 at 3:08 am
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      Windows 7 is crashy as hell. I get a Windows 7 crash about once a day, and yes that’s will all current patches installed. Only reason I am using it at all is to to a particular application that requires it.

      I don’t remember ever seeing an Ubuntu crash. My only current Ubuntu gripes are:

      1) poor wireless support

      2) horrible gui interface for managing wireless settings and connections.

    25. Anonymous said on September 27, 2012 at 5:34 pm
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      to whomever it may concern: i have been using linux ubuntu since the begining of time. i love my linux ubuntu, why, because i have never had a problem with viruses or any other internet situation. i started using linux when i found it on the internet. i never thought i would be able to master it, but i did. i have given up on windows. at first it was difficult but i finally got it all together. widows is okay for a secondary operation system. thank you linux. jr

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