How to remove the new Microsoft Edge if uninstallation is blocked - gHacks Tech News

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How to remove the new Microsoft Edge if uninstallation is blocked

Microsoft started to push the new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge web browser via Windows Update to Windows devices. The company made the decision to roll out the web browser over time to monitor the distribution.

The browser would be pushed to systems only if Microsoft did not detect its installation already on the system. Interested administrators could install the Chromium-based Edge manually on supported systems prior to Microsoft starting the migration via Windows Update.
Windows updates such as KB4541301, KB4541302 and KB4559309 replace the classic version of Microsoft Edge with the new version. While there are ways to prevent the installation of these updates, it is likely that the new Edge will be pushed via Windows Updates to the majority of Windows systems; and yes, that includes unsupported Windows 7 installations.
The new Edge is undoubtedly an improvement when compared to the classic version, and there are probably only a few users out there who prefer the classic version. Many users are probably indifferent to Edge as they use other browsers.

If Microsoft Edge is installed via Windows Updates, then it is not possible to uninstall the browser using the Apps interface of the Settings application or the dedicated Software Control Panel application. It is unclear why Microsoft made the decision; a likely explanation is that users would end up without a version of Edge on the system as the classic version is removed when the new is installed. There is still Internet Explorer available as a last resort though.

Some Windows users may prefer to remove the newly installed Microsoft Edge browser again from the system. While that cannot be done using standard uninstallation options, it can be done by running a single command from the Command Prompt or a PowerShell window.

uninstall new microsoft edge windows

Note: We suggest that you back up the main system partition before you run the command. While it should not have any adverse effects on the system, it is always better to have a backup at hand that you can restore.

  1. Open File Explorer and go to C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft\Edge\Application.
  2. Open the version folder, e.g. 83.0.478.58 and then the installer folder, so that you end up at C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft\Edge\Application\83.0.478.58\Installer.
  3. Select File > Open Windows PowerShell > Open Windows PowerShell as administrator.
  4. Type cmd.
  5. Run the following command: setup.exe --uninstall --system-level --verbose-logging --force-uninstall

The Chromium-based Microsoft Edge web browser is removed from the system when you run the command.

The new Microsoft Edge browser is no longer on the system, and the classic Edge is not either. It is possible to install the latest version of Microsoft Edge manually from the official download site though; this allows you to uninstall the browser at any time just like any other installed browser on the system (with the exception of Internet Explorer). Another advantage of the manual option is that you can select the channel that you want to install, e.g. Beta or Canary instead of Stable. The option is also available if you keep the Windows Update version of Microsoft Edge (apart from Stable).

Now You: Have you tried the Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser? (via Deskmodder)

Summary
How to remove the new Microsoft Edge if uninstallation is blocked
Article Name
How to remove the new Microsoft Edge if uninstallation is blocked
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Find out how to uninstall the new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge web browser on Windows systems if the default ways of removing the browser are not available.
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Ghacks Technology News
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Comments

  1. John Wold said on July 7, 2020 at 8:37 am
    Reply

    Hi Martin.

    Steps 3 and 4 are a little confusing.

    3. Select File > Open Windows PowerShell > Open Windows PowerShell as administrator.
    4. Type cmd.

    Why would you open Windows PowerShell first and then run the Command Prompt from within?

    Is it not easier to skip step 3 and run cmd.exe as Administrator directly?

    1. Martin Brinkmann said on July 7, 2020 at 10:40 am
      Reply

      You can also open an elevated command prompt at the location.

  2. chariot wheel ears said on July 7, 2020 at 9:03 am
    Reply

    MS Windows should come with the option at boot where if you disagree with accepting the EULA, you are presented with actual, real world options, like, say, pointing you to a free OS, offer to format the drive and replace it with something free and explaining why.

    What does W10 do if you don’t accept the EULA on a computer/device which you own? You go no further, right? What option is left for you, the consumer.. just reboot into W10 over and over and decline, decline, decline and now enjoy your useless paperweight? Because currently there is no other clear option available to the average user.

    “If Microsoft Edge is installed via Windows Updates, then it is not possible to uninstall the browser using the Apps interface of the Settings application or the dedicated Software Control Panel application. It is unclear why Microsoft made the decision;”

    It’s clear enough to me. User retention.

    A company with billions of dollars can’t come up with their own web browser? That’s just sad.

    The command line options offer aren’t something Grandma or Grandpa likely know how to use. W10 is not ready for the desktop.

    1. owl said on July 7, 2020 at 12:14 pm
      Reply

      I’m that Grandpa.
      The grandpa generation used computers with DOS (IBM PC DOS and MS-DOS) specifications.
      That generations (e.g. Steve Jobs, Bill Gates) has product a technology that leads to now.

      The younger generation today is ignorant and indifferent to the program because they know only smartphones (without using a PC).
      It is not generational problems, but Whether there is it or not a “spirit of inquiry” and a “love of learning”.

      As reference information:
      Windows 10 – It’s a privacy nightmare | PrivacyTools.io
      https://www.privacytools.io/operating-systems/#win10
      Some good news:
      ● WindowsSpyBlocker – Open-source tool that blocks data collection.
      https://github.com/crazy-max/WindowsSpyBlocker/releases
      ● Comparison of Windows 10 Privacy tools – ghacks.net
      https://www.ghacks.net/2015/08/14/comparison-of-windows-10-privacy-tools/
      More bad news:
      ● Windows 10 Sends Your Data 5500 Times Every Day Even After Tweaking Privacy Settings – The Hacker News.
      https://thehackernews.com/2016/02/microsoft-windows10-privacy.html
      ● Even when told not to, Windows 10 just can’t stop talking to Microsoft. It’s no wonder that privacy activists are up in arms. – Ars Technica.
      https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/08/even-when-told-not-to-windows-10-just-cant-stop-talking-to-microsoft/
      ● Windows 10 Reserves The Right To Block Pirated Games And ‘Unauthorized’ Hardware. – Techdirt.
      https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20150820/06171332012/windows-10-reserves-right-to-block-pirated-games-unauthorized-hardware.shtml

      1. VioletMoon said on July 7, 2020 at 5:46 pm
        Reply

        Using a custom Hosts file may work better, but somewhere along the route one or many more of the programs on a computer are sending data somewhere.

        The earlier article for ports scanner is helpful to see what’s happening. The article was on “Behave.”

        https://www.andreafortuna.org/2020/03/13/how-to-block-windows-10-telemetry-using-hosts-file/

        As for Edge, I think it’s a sharp, speedy browser; however, I don’t have it set up for daily work which means I never see it, the browser never opens, and as long as Edge leaves me alone, I leave Edge alone.

        Nirsoft TCP View? CurrPorts?

      2. Anonymous said on July 8, 2020 at 5:40 pm
        Reply

        “Nirsoft TCP View? CurrPorts?”

        Wireshark.

      3. owl said on July 8, 2020 at 2:05 am
        Reply

        From a privacy perspective, the true nature of Microsoft (Edge) is wicked and unreliable.
        Microsoft Edge has more telemetry that violates privacy than other browsers | betanews
        https://betanews.com/2020/03/09/microsoft-edge-privacy-telemetry/
        The Dutch government “reports large-scale and confidential collection of personal data through the telemetry function built into Microsoft Office,” reports | ZDNet
        https://www.zdnet.com/article/dutch-government-report-says-microsoft-office-telemetry-collection-breaks-gdpr/

      4. ULBoom said on July 8, 2020 at 4:42 pm
        Reply

        @owl

        The “younger generation,” I call it Phone Culture, has been gradually accustomed by myriad inane services and constant badgering to doing less and less resulting in them knowing less and less. It’s not age though, it’s life through a tiny gadget.

        This morning, my android phone’s log showed over 3000 attempts to connect to something over an 8 hour period. It’s an old phone with few apps. It was just sitting on a table, hasn’t been used in three days. ALL of those attempts were blocked by AdGuard but the phone keeps trying, too stupid to know it’s requests are going nowhere.

        Our newer, more “advanced (hah!)” phones do the same except in much higher quantity.

        Meanwhile our Linux installations look for updates when started because they’re set to do so, then just sit there, no online activity ever unless the user requests something.

        Windows’ pinging can be largely shut down with Pro versions, a system level blocker and VPN if desired; takes some effort but not difficult.

        Try Ubuntu, it’s simple and works well. The desktop can be changed, there’s a minimal version offered during installation, telemetry is optional and easy to disable.

        No, Edge is not something I’d use, the old version’s gigantic interface was awful and the new one combines chrome’s special form of ad creep while using the OS’s DNS. I’ve never seen an ad for something I want, so why help ad companies?

      5. owl said on July 9, 2020 at 9:14 am
        Reply

        @ULBoom: Try Ubuntu, it’s simple and works well. The desktop can be changed, there’s a minimal version offered during installation, telemetry is optional and easy to disable.
        @tester: why don’t you simply switch to LINUX as an OS?. Stable, powerful and free. +Easy UI. I did 8 yrs ago. Will never go back to Windows…

        Thanks to UL Boom for mentioning Ubuntu. I used to consider Ubuntu as a candidate for “alternative” because it was recommended by my friends.

        The PC I’m currently using is a Dell-packaged (OS pre-installed) product and I purchased it with a “5-year full service warranty”.
        The agreement clearly states that “the warranty will be terminated if the OS specified in the product specifications is changed”.
        From that reason, During the warranty period “From the point of view of customer support, it is better to keep using Windows” it is the idea that.

        The first personal computer was the Macintosh, but for business reasons I also bought a “DOS / V” machine.
        It is a Dell product from the beginning, and it is the purchase history of Win3.1>Win95>WinXP>Win8>Win10 machines.
        WinXP machine (laptop computer) and Win8 machines (Ultrabook) were died due to “Overheating due to cooling problems”.
        However, Dell products many times during use (24 hours/365 days free phone support, remote support, onsite repair, replacement) warranty helped.
        From that experience, I continue to use “Dell” products.
        Because the trouble is none in the current machine (Desktop computers), it no longer uses even customer support.
        Depending on future Microsoft circumstances, I am considering migrating to Linux even during the warranty period.

        About my current specifications:
        https://www.ghacks.net/2020/07/05/behave-for-chrome-and-firefox-warns-you-of-port-scans-and-local-attacks/#comment-4467353

  3. owl said on July 7, 2020 at 9:40 am
    Reply

    I don’t intend to use “Microsoft’s” browser. It has always been consistent.
    By “SharpApp” and “W10Privacy”, I have removed all Microsoft’s broadware and also have blocking Microsoft’s telemetries.
    Of course, updates to the new Edge has been blocked:
    Blocker Toolkit to disable automatic delivery of Microsoft Edge | Microsoft Docs
    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/deployedge/microsoft-edge-blocker-toolkit
    As a general rule, we only accept updates for Windows Defender, other updates follow the “Belarc Advisor”.
    My current OS:
    Windows 10 (x64) Version 1903 (build 18362.900)

    “Firefox ESR” is my favorite browser, but “Brave” is enough when I need Chromium. That is my conclusion.
    In the others, I use “Firefox DeveloperEdition” to support AMO development, and also use “Firefox Nightly” for testing new features and such.
    And, Pale Moon, Tor Browser, Iridium browser are implemented too.

    I prefer “RSS subscriptions”, so I prefer to use Thunderbird to “check RSS along with email” rather than Browser.
    As an aid to this, “ThunderbirdTray” is useful.
    TheGuardianWolf/ThunderbirdTray: Minimise thunderbird to tray with a Windows tray app. | GitHub
    https://github.com/TheGuardianWolf/ThunderbirdTray
    Minimize Thunderbird to the system tray with ThunderBirdTray | gHacks Tech News
    https://www.ghacks.net/2019/12/30/minimize-thunderbird-to-the-system-tray-with-thunderbirdtray/

    1. tester said on July 7, 2020 at 2:09 pm
      Reply

      why don’t you simply switch
      to LINUX as an OS?.
      Stable, powerful and free.
      +Easy UI.

      I did 8 yrs ago.
      Will never go back to Windows…

  4. Anonymous said on July 7, 2020 at 10:41 am
    Reply

    It should be

    3. Select File > Open Windows PowerShell > Open Windows PowerShell as administrator

    OR!

    4. Type cmd.
    Then
    5. Run the following command: setup.exe –uninstall –system-level –verbose-logging –force-uninstall

    This happen if you just copy &paste from original source.

    1. Martin Brinkmann said on July 7, 2020 at 11:50 am
      Reply

      The “command” cmd starts a new instance of the Windows command interpreter from a PowerShell window.

      See: https://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/7703.powershell-running-executables.aspx

  5. Anonymous said on July 7, 2020 at 12:30 pm
    Reply

    What is the sense in starting “cmd” through an Powershell instance?

    All you need is Start > Run > type “cmd” to start a standalone command interpreter instance

    Whether you execute the command
    “setup.exe –uninstall –system-level –verbose-logging –force-uninstall”

    in the cmd or Powershell play no role = same result!

  6. Gusmaia said on July 7, 2020 at 1:30 pm
    Reply

    1. Try brute force: Just delete the new Edge folder. Apparently the old Edge is only hidden. It worked for me, after I’ve tried the Windows-support suggested procedures.
    2. Oddly, I am one of those users who prefer the old Edge. It is odd because the feature I like is the embedded pdf reader. The old Edge allow for 2-page viewing and to scroll down thru document tabs. Acrobat reader is too cumbersome for the my peculiar needs and the previous versions Windows Reader was just great.

    1. owl said on July 8, 2020 at 2:00 am
      Reply

      The browser function is one of the core functions of “Windows OS” and is a part of the component.
      In other words, the browser (Edge, IE) cannot be deleted due to the design of the OS. At first glance, even if it looks like it could be deleted, it will be restored after rebooting.

      In fact, it can’t be deleted, so browser “Disable” is the best solution.
      There are several ways to do this, but you can easily disable it using a “third party app”.
      However, it may be reset after the OS is updated, so you may need to “disable” it again.
      Edge Blocker
      https://www.sordum.org/9312/edge-blocker-v1-6/
      O&O ShutUp10:
      https://www.oo-software.com/en/shutup10
      SharpApp
      https://github.com/builtbybel/sharpapp
      W10Privacy
      https://www.w10privacy.de/english-home/instructions-1/

  7. Anonymous said on July 7, 2020 at 2:45 pm
    Reply

    I see Edge in the control panel > uninstall a program.Why would there be an option in there but not work.So what exactly happens if you proceed.

    1. Martin Brinkmann said on July 7, 2020 at 2:57 pm
      Reply

      The option is grayed out only if Edge was installed via Windows Update. If you installed it manually, it should be removable.

      1. Anonymous said on July 7, 2020 at 3:36 pm
        Reply

        Well it looks like I can still click on it,it wasn’t greyed out.This is what it said:

        Uninstall Microsoft Edge

        Are you sure want to uninstall Microsoft Edge?

        ☐ Also clear browsing data?

        Uninstall Cancel

      2. Anonymous said on July 9, 2020 at 10:11 am
        Reply

        I can confirm that l uninstalled Edge from the control panel.This after windows update had installed it on windows 7 pro.So it has definitely been removed from the computer.

  8. JohnIL said on July 7, 2020 at 9:53 pm
    Reply

    Problem with legacy Edge is that development has stopped for fixing issues, or adding new features. Yes it gets security fixes but that’s it, so I am sure this is a reason Microsoft is pushing Edge Chromium. Microsoft pushing out new Edge could also relate to a slow uptick in adoption of the new Chromium based Edge. I never used Edge legacy and wouldn’t really care if new Edge replaced it. Every OS comes with a default browser which you can choose to use or not use. I don’t really need to bother finding ways to uninstall it. I didn’t with Edge Legacy and won’t with Edge Chromium. Although I think if you choose to do so, there should be a easy way to do so.

  9. Maggie Bell said on July 8, 2020 at 12:33 pm
    Reply

    I thought removing Chromium Edge would leave me without a MS browser (IE11 is still somewhere, but I disabled it). But not so.

    I had manually installed the new Edge and it replaced Legacy Edge. But I rather stick with the Vivaldi Browser which has some great features I use a lot. Now I followed the steps Martin has suggested to remove Chromium Edge and it worked, but after a reboot Legacy Edge is back again…

  10. commenter said on July 8, 2020 at 1:41 pm
    Reply

    In the art it says to backup the system. While I get why to backup the system, why not backup only the program that you want to uninstall?

    Please and thank you

  11. commenter said on July 8, 2020 at 1:44 pm
    Reply

    As how to backup only the program, I could create a zip file from it and put it in a safe place.

  12. Matthew said on July 28, 2020 at 12:14 am
    Reply

    I open Command Prompt as Administrator, enter the command:
    cd C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft\Edge\Application\81.0.416.88\ <<– my version

    All good so far..

    Then enter the command:
    setup.exe –uninstall –system-level –verbose-logging –force-uninstall

    I receive the message:
    'setup.exe' is not recognized as an internal or external command,
    operable program or batch file.

    Is there an alternative for the setup.exe –uninstall –system-level –verbose-logging –force-uninstall command or a variation?

    1. Martin Brinkmann said on July 28, 2020 at 6:34 am
      Reply

      You need to go into the folder installer first.

    2. Dean King said on August 2, 2020 at 8:22 pm
      Reply

      try msedge.exe –uninstall –system-level –verbose-logging –force-uninstall

      1. Dean King said on August 2, 2020 at 8:24 pm
        Reply

        tho I will add, this doesn’t actually remove anything even tho the prompt to remove edge and all browsing data shows, the browser still remains in the system so it appears it is integral to the latest update.

      2. Anonymous said on September 8, 2020 at 8:21 pm
        Reply

        Wow that worked for me! THX!

  13. Michael said on July 28, 2020 at 3:33 pm
    Reply

    Edge was added to my system automatically today. I went through all the steps but rather than uninstalling it simply opens up the browser. Is there another way to get rid of it?

    1. Michael said on July 28, 2020 at 3:36 pm
      Reply

      Got it. The instructions I was following from another site left out the step of typing cmd. It worked now.

  14. JohnIL said on August 1, 2020 at 5:38 pm
    Reply

    Never got the obsession some have with removing Edge? Especially now since new Edge is so much better then old (legacy) Edge. I mean its not like you can’t just change your default browser to whatever you want. I never used legacy Edge and have only tried Edge Chromium a few times. I get the need to replace Edge Legacy because Microsoft is not fully supporting it. The future is Edge Chromium for Windows default browser baked in. But you can ignore it easy enough and I don’t see the need to do anymore then that.

    1. Anonymous said on October 29, 2020 at 1:20 pm
      Reply

      Edge is a privacy hole. It’s terrible what MS does.

  15. ABJ4403 said on September 28, 2020 at 5:53 am
    Reply

    Microsoft Edge is sucks alot.
    That’s it i’m done.
    im moving to linux mint 2020.03.
    bye windows 10.
    sad :(
    i will NEVER go back windows 10 ever ever again.

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