Liquid Rescale plugin for Gimp - gHacks Tech News

Liquid Rescale plugin for Gimp

You might remember the technology demonstration a few weeks ago that introduced a new way of intelligently resizing images by automatically defining important and lesser important parts of the image. The results looked way better than the traditional approach which did not care about importance but reduced every aspect with the same ratio.

Liquid Rescale is a plugin for Gimp which adds this functionality to Gimp. I was a little bit surprised that it took just a few weeks to create the plugin, which currently does everything shown in the tech demo except real-time resizing.

The Liquid Rescale plugin requires Gimp 2.1.1.3 or newer and can be found in the Layer menu after installation. Take a look at the technology demonstration below in case you missed it. The plugin itself is available for Linux and Windows.

Here is how the plug-in looks like in the GIMP image editor. As you can see you get a couple of options including selecting the new height and width of the image.

liquid rescale

Update: The developers have improved the plugin, and released updates to keep the plugin compatible with every new version of Gimp released. They have also improved the website, by uploading examples and tutorials, both in textual form and as videos, to it. Especially the tutorials are a great way to start, after looking at the examples provided on the website to get an impression of what the Gimp plugin is capable of.

To install the plugin, simply download it for your operating system from the official web page, and run the installer afterwards. The website offers detailed instructions for all supported operating systems, which you should follow by the letter to make sure it installs correctly in the image editor.

A good way of getting started is to watch the video tutorials the developers have released that highlight how you can use the plug-in in the image editor.

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Comments

  1. stumeikle said on October 9, 2007 at 11:25 am
    Reply

    what’s with 7-Zip compressed archives? why can’t you use a normal zip program like everyone else ?

  2. NE said on October 23, 2007 at 12:05 pm
    Reply

    Everyone else IS using 7zip. Only idiots continue to use the outdate crappy zip.

  3. Shimi said on January 11, 2008 at 12:41 am
    Reply

    “Everyone else” is quite alot of people, So stop patronizing and use both if you can’t give up this i-especially-need-to-download-a-new-program compression file.

  4. NE said on January 11, 2008 at 8:07 am
    Reply

    Your comment doesn’t make much sense. I said everyone else is using 7zip. You then apparently agree with me that ‘everyone else=a lot of people are using 7zip’. You then say people should also use zip. If everyone else (i.e. a lot of people) are using 7zip then why should anyone waste their time with zip? Were you trying to say a lot of people don’t have 7zip support? If you were you should make this clear since as it stands your comment doesn’t make much sense. But your claim has little proof in any case however my claim is easily proven, take a look around and see the amount of stuff now distributed as 7zip…

    Fact is, why should developers and others who distribute files for you waste their time and bandwidth because some people are too lazy or stupid to enable support for what is becoming the most common compression format? Frankly, if you are too stupid or too lazy to download something to support 7zip compression you probably shouldn’t be downloading most of the stuff released in 7zip because there is a very good chance you will be too stupid or too lazy to be able to make any use of what you just downloaded.

    If you have some sort of support contract with whoever is distributing the file with 7zip then sure you can complain. But most of the files distributed via 7zip are unsupport stuff released by people at no cost so you realisticlly have absolutely no right to demand that they distribute their program via zip.

    BTW, you have to download a program to use zip anyway. Using zip compression folders in Windows is a bad idea, it’s notoriously unreliable. And if you are downloading a program to support zip then you should have 7zip support as well. Only a real minority of poorly designed programs don’t support 7zip as well as zip (like WinZip). And why you would want to use a propriety POS like WinZip instead of something like 7zip is beyond me…. If you really want to use a propriety program get something decent like WinRAR (which does support 7zip).

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