Here is what is new and changed in Firefox 78.0 - gHacks Tech News

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Here is what is new and changed in Firefox 78.0

Firefox 78.0 is the latest stable version of the Firefox web browser. It was first offered on June 30, 2020 and is the second major release of the browser in June 2020.

The new version is offered via in-browser upgrades and as a direct download from the Mozilla website.

Firefox 78 is the first release of the new Firefox ESR, Extended Support Release, version and as such, introduces major changes to systems that are upgraded from previous 68.x ESR versions.

All Firefox channels are updated around the same time. Firefox Beta and Developer will get bumped to version 79.0, Firefox Nightly to version 80.0, and Firefox ESR to version 78.0 just like Firefox Stable. The Android version of Firefox will also be upgraded to 78.0 as it follows the ESR release schedule until the migration to the new Android browser completes.

The next stable version of the Firefox web browser will be released on  July 28, 2020.

Executive Summary

  • Firefox ESR is now available in a new major version (78.0).
  • WebRender rollout continues.
  • TLS 1.0 and 1.1 are now disabled.
  • Firefox 78 is the last major release that supports Mac OS 10.9, 10.10, and 10.11. Users will be supported through the Firefox 78.x lifecycle.

Firefox 78.0 download and update

firefox 78.0

The rollout of the new Firefox versions starts on June 30, 2020. Firefox installations will pick up the new version automatically if automatic updating has not been disabled in the browser.

Firefox users may select Menu > Help > About Firefox to run a manual check for updates. Note that the release may not be offered right away as it may not be released yet if you try to upgrade to early on June 30, 2020.

The following pages list direct downloads for supported Firefox channels (will be available later on June 30, 2020)

Firefox 78.0 Changes

  • Support for TLS 1.0 and 1.1 is dropped. DHE cipher suites are no longer supported.
  • New major Firefox ESR version.

TLS 1.0 and 1.1 changes, and DHE cipher suites

tls firefox version

Mozilla's initial plan was to drop support for the outdated security protocols TLS 1.0 and 1.1 in Firefox 74.0. The organization re-enabled the protocols  because of the Coronavirus pandemic and Google, and has now disabled the protocols again in Firefox 78.0.

All major browser makes pledged to remove support for the protocols from their browsers to push the adoption of TLS 1.2 and TLS 1.3 which offer better security and performance.

The protocols have not been removed in Firefox 78.0. It is still possible to restore these by doing the following:

  1. Type about:config in the web browser's address bar.
  2. Confirm that you will be careful if the warning is displayed.
  3. Search for security.tls.version.min.
  4. Set the value to 1 instead of 3 (default).
    1. 1 means that protocols TLS 1.0 and newer are supported.
    2. 2 means that protocols TLS 1.1 and newer are supported.
    3. 3 means that protocols TLS 1.2 and newer are supported.

Note that Mozilla will remove support for TLS 1.0 and 1.1 eventually so that it will no longer be possible to restore support.

Tip: use the add-on IndicateTLS to show the TLS version of sites in Firefox's address bar.

Firefox 79.0 removes support for the following DEH cipher suites as well. These are considered weak according to Mozilla:

  • TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA
  • TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA

To mitigate compatibility issues, Mozilla enabled two AES-GCM SHA2-based ciphersuites.

New major Firefox ESR version

Firefox ESR 78.0 is the new major Extended Support Release version. The ESR version bumps introduces lots of new features to the ESR channel as these get security and bug fix updates only for the most part during minor version upgrades

You can check out our reviews of the last eight or so Firefox Stable releases for a rundown on the changes, or check out some of the highlights here:

  • Service Worker and Push APIs enabled.
  • Picture-in-Picture support.
  • Option to manage certificates on about:certificate.
  • Support for Kiosk mode and client certificates. Support for client certificates stored can be enabled by setting the preference security.osclientcerts.autoload to true.
  • New Enterprise policies to manage some of the new features.
  • Block Autoplay is enabled.
  • Always activate Flash no longer available. Flash cannot be put in the Firefox application directory anymore.
  • Firefox does not load userChrome.css and userContent.css by default. Administrators need to set the preference toolkit.legacyUserProfileCustomizations.stylesheets to true to enable support.

Check out this Firefox 78.0 ESR guide on the Mozilla website for additional changes.

Other changes

firefox protections dashboard

Firefox for Android

Mozilla lists "various stability and security fixes" without providing details.

Developer Changes

  • RegExp engine update introduces support for all new features of ECMAScript 2018.
  • Firefox ESR 78 is the first version that supports Service Workers and Push API.
  • WebAssembly improvements.

Known Issues

none listed.

Security updates / fixes

Security updates are revealed after the official release of the web browser. You find the information published here.

Additional information / sources

Summary
Here is what is new and changed in Firefox 78.0
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Here is what is new and changed in Firefox 78.0
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Firefox 78.0 is the latest stable version of the Firefox web browser. It was first offered on June 30, 2020 and is the second major release of the browser in June 2020.
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Comments

  1. Iron Heart said on June 30, 2020 at 8:08 am

    > Firefox ESR 78 is the first version that supports Service Workers and Push API.

    > Users from the UK get Pocket Recommendations on the New Tab Page.

    Eww. Why?

    Say what you will about projects like Pale Moon or Waterfox – these things are the reasons why they have to exist.

    1. Gilean said on June 30, 2020 at 12:23 pm

      Why would you care what is bundled in the UK? You don’t even use Firefox.
      *** [Editor: removed,please stay polite, thanks!]

      1. Iron Heart said on June 30, 2020 at 1:03 pm

        @Gilean

        Other countries already have the Pocket nonsense, the UK is just the most recent addition. And I think Pocket being bloat which is only in Firefox because Mozilla wants to promote Pocket needs no further explanation, or does it?

      2. Gilean said on June 30, 2020 at 2:29 pm

        *** [User: T*oll is not an insult. It describes the behaviour of his targeted crusades against certain developers, thanks!]

    2. T J said on June 30, 2020 at 8:37 pm

      @ Martin Brinkmann

      As usual , commenters who NEVER use Firefox make detrimental comments about the browser:
      Bloat, Spyware, Stupid Developers, Etcetra, Etcetra ….

      May I suggest that they browse the post below, with specific reference to Brave.

      .https://spyware.neocities.org/articles/

      Of course, the comments from certain people will be that Neocity is totally wrong in its assessments !!

      1. Iron Heart said on July 1, 2020 at 7:43 am

        @T J

        > Of course, the comments from certain people will be that Neocity is totally wrong in its assessments !!

        You fears are of course proven correct, the website is utter BS and also very obscure for good reason. Let’s see what it has to say about Brave regardless:

        > Whitelisting spyware from Facebook and Twitter

        They had to whitelist some (not all!) Facebook and Twitter cookies under pressure from the community, because blocking those cookies broke the login forms of these websites. Shipping a browser that can’t guarantee that Twitter and Facebook work correctly ould be suicidal considering the number of users Facebook and Twitter have. Brave is transparent about the whitelist and one can disable it in the settings if one doesn’t have a Facebook or Twitter account.

        By the way, not even uBlock Origin, THE reference adblocker, blocks those by default, much for the same reasons (not wanting to break Twitter and Facebook).

        The first BS point debunked.

        > Auto-updates

        Not even a privacy threat, necessary for security. Total BS point.

        > Anti-privacy search engine by default

        They mean Google, the search engine almost all(!) browsers use as the default. And it also depends on the region, DuckDuckGo is Brave’s default search engine in Europe, for example.

        > Brave’s start page contains analytics

        The website of Brave contains analytics? Well, the website is not part of the browser at all. Total BS point.

        > Crash reports

        Yep, like all other browsers, Brave sends crash reports. Big deal (lol), and can be disabled in the settings with literally two clicks.

        > Other requests

        Here the Neocities guy talks about a single connection necessary to keep the BAT exchange rate updated, as well as the connection Brave establishes to update its HTTPS Everywhere rulesets – if anything, keeping HTTPS Everywhere updated is a privacy Pro, not a Con.

        Debunked in less than five minutes, as always. Nice smearing attempt anyway.

        PS: https://spyware.neocities.org/articles/firefox.html

      2. Iron Heart said on July 1, 2020 at 7:45 am

        *Your, would

      3. SpywareFan said on July 1, 2020 at 7:23 pm

        https://github.com/brave/brave-browser/wiki/Brave%E2%80%99s-Use-of-Referral-Codes
        https://github.com/brave/brave-browser/issues/9715 ( https://github.com/brave/brave-browser/issues/1736 )
        https://github.com/brave/brave-core/pull/5635
        https://github.com/brave/brave-browser/issues/9911
        https://davidgerard.co.uk/blockchain/2020/06/06/the-brave-web-browser-is-hijacking-links-and-inserting-affiliate-codes/
        It remains in my untrusted software list.

        Pocket? I have a firewall!
        Pale Moon? Don’t fit my needs.
        Waterfox? Same as above.
        All Google spyChromiums? OMG, the worst browsers I ever seen in all my life, it’s pretty clear that the “proprietary open source” spyChromium is made by an advertising corporation who wants to rule the world.
        FF adding bloat instead of focusing in important things, what a waste of time, but at least once tweaked it’s a safe and powerful browser, not as before, but…

        Sad days for the web…

  2. Benjamin said on June 30, 2020 at 8:33 am

    …are the guys over at the mozilla foundation happy about what they are doing or why is it that so many constant changes are brought upon all of us regularly?

    Why is it that such an important piece of software has no democratic legitimacy at all yet affects potentially hundreds of millions of people every day?

    I have a strong and unpleasant feeling that i am losing control over the internet and technologies that make it available on way or another.

    Why are there no public debates and decitions about a technology which affects the lives and livelihoods of so many people? It is comparable to a situation were a select few would control the supply of drinking water for the rest of the planet. No?

    1. Iron Heart said on June 30, 2020 at 11:02 am

      @Benjamin

      > Why are there no public debates and decitions about a technology which affects the lives and livelihoods of so many people? It is comparable to a situation were a select few would control the supply of drinking water for the rest of the planet. No?

      Because the major browser engines (Blink, WebKit, Gecko) are all developed by big corporate entities, with the users having virtually no say in which direction the engines and web standards are taken.

      If you dislike the fact, you could use a browser with more direct community involvement. That’s always an option.

      1. Benjamin said on June 30, 2020 at 1:57 pm

        Is it an option for the larger public as well?

        No it is not because these kind of options are never mentioned for the larger public. To be able to make choices we all need access to neutral, trustable or even kind information which we do not get to easily.

        Even is there is some kind of choice, democracy looks entirely different because it would tell corporations under which rules they are allowed to operate and this must include rules and regulations for the good of societies and individuals. That is not the case…

    2. pd said on June 30, 2020 at 11:39 am

      Couldn’t agree with you more in terms of the number of updates. It’s not reasonable except for one point: the web as a platform arguably has to compete with horrible closed systems like phone apps. If the web cannot do what phone apps can do, or the web stagnates so much that it drives developers nuts, then site developers will find other means to deliver their services. Often that means closed code that is worse than websites.

      Simple example? We have to *trust* that the apps on our phones are using encryption because there’s no required for them to have the same sort of location bar encryption indication that browser and the web have used since the 90s.

      As for losing control. People who use services that depend on critical mass, and therefore are just easier to cave in to despite their privacy-invading abuse of users, are as responsible for the abuse as the companies themselves. Do you have to use FB and Twit? Do we have to use Goowellian?

      The point about rapid releases is very reasonable until we factor in the rapid rate at which such user abuse can escalate. Traditional release cycles that spanned a period of several months may not have enabled Firefox to rapidly roll out the very impressive, user-focused, anti-spyware and malware (cookies, fingerprinting) that Firefox has impressively rolled out.

      I think I really can see your point but nominating first Firefox as a key actor in the syndrome you are outlining, and secondly the release cycle, I’m not so sure that is fair. Firefox is the only browser not solely beholden to a completely for-profit company. Mozilla has charters and does factor in user liberty on the internet as a core mission objective.

      It’s not perfect but it really sounds like your issues would be somewhat addressed by switching to the ESR version of Firefox. I have and it’s much easier. Now is the time to do so as if you want half way through the next cycle, there may be issues switching to ESR from the rapid-release “Stable” version of Firefox.

      In terms of democracy over the internet. By all means the internet has been allowed to evolve with little to no government regulatory oversight of the type we might reasonably expect unless we’re some sort of uncivilised “down to so-called big government” clown.

      California dictates the internet with the bulk of browser code released and written there. It’s not legitimate for any one state or nation to dictate the internet through the means of accessing it. Speaking of accessibility, that’s about the only aspect of the internet that has attracted some degree of regulation in the form of Section 508 regulations for making web sites available (“accessible” or usable) to people with various limited ability issues.

      OTOH the World Wide Web (w3C) consortium, whilst driven by mostly those companies that build browsers, is AFAIK at least relatively democratic. There’s committees galore to the level that Humphrey Appleby would be proud.

      Unfortunately though, Mozilla also failed the biggest test of it’s ethics in it’s history when it forced it’s CTO to leave simply because he supported a currently-unpopular view. Good old digital-age, politically correct democracy: diversity as long as that means being accepted as different in new ways instead of different in that you still believe in an older values.

      1. anonymous said on June 30, 2020 at 6:38 pm

        Well, when holding “older values” means hating and/or discriminating against certain groups of people, then certainly people with power over others should be called to account. That’s not to say that there isn’t sometimes an overreaction, of course.

    3. ULBoom said on June 30, 2020 at 10:05 pm

      Control over the Internet (I’m taking that as user control over their software,devices and online activity) was lost long, long ago. It is possible to regain a high degree of control by modifying browsers (FF is way out in front in that regard), your OS, using a VPN if needed, system level privacy tools, etc. Takes a lot of effort.

      That’s how things have been for at least 20 years with the reliance on ad revenue as a model increasing over time driving more sophistication in collection methods. It is more noticeable now with incessant intrusions on users’ activities and hard sells for useless services.

      The things I mentioned mostly make browsing much more pleasurable and private for someone willing to understand the tools; anonymity from those with the technical capabilities to identify individuals likely is impossible.

      Seems as though lately “Tech” companies are desperately scurrying to collect more and more user data at the expense of their software. IDK why, maybe regulatory action on the horizon; that’s the only thing that has a chance of keeping Google’s single minded ad greed from shutting out all the small players.

      Even so, none of the stupid tricks and even stupider appeals to “security” or pity for ad companies (HA! HA! HA!) have resulted in less privacy for those who want it. The average user, however, is being treated worse every day.

      Nothing preventing anyone from doing what they can to block unwanted tracking and ad delivery.

  3. Microfix said on June 30, 2020 at 8:36 am

    [quote]Firefox ESR 79.0 is the new major Extended Support Release version[/quote] ahem?

    Sticking with ESR 68.9 for a while, historically there have been point releases very soon after initial rtm to fix things that should have been picked up prior to that timeline. These TLS versions 1.0 and 1.1 have been disabled here for years without issue. Not much else is exciting in this release worthy of immediate update. YMMV

    1. pd said on June 30, 2020 at 11:50 am

      68 is the first time I’ve managed to get off the rapid-release roller coaster. I was not too sure (hoping against hope) if ESR simply meant we still had to accept all the minor release changes but they are just bundled up and released every year or so. Of course it does, unfortunately. There’s still value is ESR. I’ll take approximately yearly updates over monthly meaningless annoyance releases any time.

      Just in case the worst was true – ESR gets all the monthly changes just rolled into one big batch – I’ve been keeping an eye on those changes. Mostly there’s been no red flags for me but whatever the truck they did to the location bar appears to be a dog’s breakfast. Will have to figure out how to counteract all that crap but thankfully there’s often resources around to help me do just that. The benefit of ESR? All those resources (hacks from disaffected but savvy users) are often quite mature having been refined after the changes they correct have been tested on Stable users as unwitting guinea pigs.

    2. Mothy said on June 30, 2020 at 5:33 pm

      There are 3 more releases of ESR 68.x yet. 68.10.0 is out today then next month 68.11 followed by 68.12 (see release schedule below). After that will be ESR 78.x if you want to stay up to date on the ESR channel.

      https://www.ghacks.net/2012/08/16/mozilla-firefox-release-schedule/

    3. pd said on June 30, 2020 at 6:08 pm

      68 is the first time I’ve managed to get off the rapid-release roller coaster. I was not too sure (hoping against hope) if ESR simply meant we still had to accept all the minor release changes but they are just bundled up and released every year or so. Of course it does, unfortunately. There’s still value is ESR. I’ll take approximately yearly updates over monthly meaningless annoyance releases any time.

      Just in case the worst was true – ESR gets all the monthly changes just rolled into one big batch – I’ve been keeping an eye on those changes. Mostly there’s been no red flags for me but whatever the truck they did to the location bar appears to be a dog’s breakfast. Will have to figure out how to counteract all that crap but thankfully there’s often resources around to help me do just that. The benefit of ESR? All those resources (hacks from disaffected but savvy users) are often quite mature having been refined after the changes they correct have been tested on Stable users as unwitting guinea pigs.

    4. microfix said on July 1, 2020 at 1:47 pm

      And a day after the initial release of both browsers..
      Firefox and Firefox ESR have a point release to 78.01

  4. Kincaid said on June 30, 2020 at 9:40 am

    I count 5 errors in this article. Time to hire a proofreader.

    1. walker said on June 30, 2020 at 7:51 pm

      well, I count at least one useless comment in this article.

  5. Anonymous said on June 30, 2020 at 9:42 am

    “Firefox ESR 79.0 is the new major Extended Support Release version.” looks like an error.
    Probably it should be “Firefox ESR 78.0 is the new major Extended Support Release version.”?

  6. JohnIL said on June 30, 2020 at 12:14 pm

    Not sure Mozilla and Firefox target a user base that can grow their market share? Yes of course there are users who want more privacy and would consider Firefox. But then you have to question if this is just a niche browser serving only those types of users?

  7. Jane said on June 30, 2020 at 12:15 pm

    @Kincaid
    Could you please list the errors?

  8. Tom Hawack said on June 30, 2020 at 1:42 pm

    “Firefox 78 is the first release of the new Firefox ESR, Extended Support Release, version and as such, introduces major changes to systems that are upgraded from previous 68.x ESR versions.”

    That’s why I avoid ESRs : when updated you have to catch up far too much.

    Firefox 78.0 itself isn’t a major update. I shouldn’t add ‘fortunately’ but that’s what I have in mind given I expect from big changes more of the worst than of the best, perhaps an increasing conservative mentality objectively related to too many gadgets appearing once in a while, subjectively caused by brains powering down with the years.

    As always I heavily rely on Ghacks-user.js to discover and understand the changes:

    Ghacks-user.js – diffs FF77-FF78 : https://github.com/ghacksuserjs/ghacks-user.js/issues/959
    Ghacks-user.js – latest (78-alpha) : https://github.com/ghacksuserjs/ghacks-user.js/blob/master/user.js

    And because Ghacks-user.js handles privacy & security settings but not of course cosmetic ones together with the fact that I like to have the browser’s GUI as I like it and cry when new CSS settings blow up my work, I’m happy to notice that Firefox 78 avoided this time exotic changes.

    The one month release cycle continues to bother me as it bothers many of us..

    1. Then said on July 1, 2020 at 1:56 pm

      @Tom Hawack

      Unfortunately user.js seems incomplete/neutered now, not sure if it can be relied upon.

      DoH is nowhere to be seen in it, not a description, warning, nothing. You’d think after being proven as a sham it would be defaulted off for those looking for privacy tweaks. Such a huge loophole, it only takes 1 or 2 like this to render everything else pointless. Why I think a barrage of ‘tweakable but bad by default’ is so hostile to privacy, difficult to find concensus and most will trip up on a few loopholes like this along the way.

      I saw names in here in the past troll and argue aggressively to get DoH defaulted on, the ‘browser can do no wrong and everything bad is good’ type, so maybe their private whispers or threats work to get privacy neutered for the rest of us.

      I would watch for serviceworkers being removed from the tweaks at some point. Good thing its there and default off for now….

      1. Iron Heart said on July 1, 2020 at 2:58 pm

        @Then

        Of course DoH is utter garbage: https://blog.powerdns.com/2019/09/25/centralised-doh-is-bad-for-privacy-in-2019-and-beyond/

        As for Firefox – the only version I would install if anyone asked me to is Firefox ESR, solely because you only have to tweak it for privacy once per year and are left alone in between. Using the rapid release channel is masochism, IMHO. But hey, there is an entire community out there hunting down and then fixing Mozilla’s numerous privacy missteps every four weeks or so. It gives them something to do, something to talk about. They are so tied to the project that they do not even realize that wading through 30+ telemetry settings in about:config alone is highly off putting and a huge red flag for anyone actually looking for privacy.

        As for me personally, I found little reason to use Firefox after the add-on armageddon of 2017, where they nuked all the classic add-ons that made the browser worth using in the first place, replacing them with WebExtensions that are exactly like their Chrome equivalents.

        This is when I switched to Ungoogled Chromium and later on to Brave. Ungoogled Chromium in particular establishes zero unsolicited requests on startup, something I would expect from Firefox (minus one request for the update server, maybe), if their marketing regarding privacy protection were actually believable. If I were you, I’d consider switching to the ESR channel, thereby reducing the tweaking to a more reasonable once per year, or to join us on the We-cuck-Google-by-using-their-technology-minus-the-spyware side of the force:

        https://chromium.woolyss.com/

      2. Tom Hawack said on July 1, 2020 at 5:21 pm

        @Then, nothing is perfect and in our perspective aiming nevertheless the best questions remain when considering pertinence. Ghacks-user.js is the best Firefox tweaker I know, been using it for years, but it’s admitted by the developers themselves that their project aims notorious concerns about privacy and security. From there on one may wonder if a given feature is or is not pertinent to privacy and security. It’s been decided that Firefox’s TRR (Trusted Recursive Resolver) or DNS resolution via DoH at the browser level, set by Firefox (not by an extension) was not to be considered to involve privacy and security issues.

        This said, we may have personal preferences and even a different analysis on Firefox’s TRR. I don’t use it myself and wouldn’t advise to do so IF no alternative encrypted DNS resolution takes place. I do use DNSCrypt-proxy myself. BUT, I remain convinced that Firefox’s TRR is better than nothing, not to mention that the user has the freedom to choose the resolver, even if the list is short compared to, say, DNSCrypt, even if the latter includes so-called ‘Anonymized Relays’ preventing the Resolver from recording the caller, even if TRR prevents the use of blacklists (OS level such as the Hosts file, Firefox itself can be defended by ‘uBlock origin’ or ‘Adblock Plus’) when DNSCrypt-proxy handles IP & domain blacklists, a whitelist, cloaking and forwarding rules : the nec plus ultra, the ultimate, a user’s heaven on steroids so to say.

        From there on, Ghacks-user.js is my main reference but this forbids no one from adding extra layers in the defense scheme.

      3. Pants said on July 1, 2020 at 11:22 pm

        @Tom Hawack

        > It’s been decided that Firefox’s TRR … involve privacy and security

        Oh, it definitely involves privacy and security, but it’s not as simplistic as some would have you think. It’s also pretty much a non-event at this stage (only rolled out to the USA), and is not quite the finished article: currently I’m waiting for web extensions DNS API to not “leak” – think uBO and CNAME uncloaking, and hosts file integration would be nice.

        There are pros and cons to having application DoH or not. Users get a doorhanger when/if it gets rolled out to them to accept/decline (but I’d have to double check the exact workings of that). There’s also a UI, so it’s not exactly hidden or anything. And there’s been a squizillion articles on DoH, and you’ll find sites like PTIO have sections about it: it’s not like anyone interested in browser privacy doesn’t know or won’t soon learn about it, or it doesn’t constantly come up in reddit posts etc

        When it is added back in the user.js it will be inactive as a FYI only, to compliment the UI: as a complete solution with all the prefs, e.g. ESNI, and with all the bugs ironed out. At this stage, not being in the user.js is no big deal: people using the user.js are either not affected and/or they are already aware

        @Them

        > so maybe their private whispers or threats work to get privacy neutered for the rest of us … I would watch for serviceworkers being removed from the tweaks at some point

        Keep drinking the cool-aid

      4. Tom Hawack said on July 2, 2020 at 10:01 am

        @Pants, OK, thanks for correcting, I acknowledge that nothing has been decided concerning TRR for the reasons you mention and that related settings will eventually be added to Ghacks-user.js, inactive and FYI, a TRR opt-out so to say for users who’d wish to disable TRR once the feature widely implemented.

        Generally speaking I understand the complexity of delivering settings, active or not (FYI) when there will always be users to consider that a given setting should be deliberately active and some others to consider it should be presented as FYI only, as if they forgot that even active settings may be commented (letting default values) or reversed/modified : too many of us expect an iinstal and forget it scheme when all and more is explained in Ghacks-user.js.

        We’re many to appreciate and rely on your work, be thanked for that, you and all those who intervene, advise, explain these and those settings, be they old, new, modified. You make things clear.

  9. Iron Heart said on June 30, 2020 at 1:47 pm

    @ShintoPlasm

    Yeah, I have no interest in the usual back and forth either. I am also of the opinion that you should use the browser capable of fulfilling the specific requirements which you freely set yourself. That being said, one can voice the opinion regarding different browsers here, after all, browsers are an important topic on gHacks in general.

    And as for my initial comment, no matter what you think about e.g. Pale Moon, it’s pretty clear that Moonchild seems to be interested in removing bloat while Mozilla is interested in adding bloat, or so it seems to me:

    https://www.basilisk-browser.org/releasenotes.shtml

    I do miss the days of the late 2000s “clean browsers”, no bloatware attached. Ungoogled Chromium and Pale Moon / Basilisk still match that category, the rest are bloated in one way or another.

  10. empirefall said on June 30, 2020 at 3:57 pm

    although I see benefit in all the changes that were introduced in this version of Firefox, what really spoke to me are the WebRender improvements and that the close multiple tabs option being relegated to a submenu, I hate it when I have to reopen a bunch of tabs just because I click on the wrong selection in the right-click drop down menu, that is annoying as all hell, I am surprised it took this long for Mozilla to sort out

  11. Engineer Thom said on June 30, 2020 at 4:46 pm

    Unlike empirefall, I really dislike useful menu items being relegated to a submenu. It’s an extra step to perform the same task.

    It needs to be an option to configure it how you want. That way, all users can be satisfied.

  12. Mothy said on June 30, 2020 at 4:50 pm

    ESR 68.10.0 is also out (see URL below) although the security fixes link doesn’t work yet. Installed it and all looks/works the same as previous version 68.9.0.

    https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/android/68.10.0/releasenotes/

    1. Mothy said on June 30, 2020 at 4:57 pm

      Oops, here is the correct URL for the desktop version: https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/68.10.0/releasenotes/

  13. Tom Hawack said on June 30, 2020 at 9:12 pm

    Those of us who use Autoconfig to fix Firefox settings may be interested by this.

    Autoconfig includes:

    // clearPref(prefName) removes the user value of a preference, resetting it to its default value.
    // pref(prefName, value) sets the user value of a preference.
    // defaultPref(prefName, value) sets the default value of a preference.
    // lockPref(prefName, value) sets the default value of a preference and locks it.

    I use only ‘lockPref’ in order to prevent any modification from the browser by another user than myself (never know).

    I’ve spent some time figuring out why I couldn’t change a site’s cookie permission from the Page Info (‘Set Cookies’ was grayed out).

    I finally discovered that two settings I had fixed with ‘lockPref’ were the culprit : it appears theses two settings need to appear in the user’s prefs.js file or be handled by a user.js file, but locked with Autoconfig just wouldn’t make it, and that is quite a surprise.

    The settings are “network.cookie.cookieBehavior” and “browser.contentblocking.category”

    In Autoconfig, following does not work :
    lockPref(“network.cookie.cookieBehavior”, 1);
    lockPref(“browser.contentblocking.category”, “custom”)

    But this does the job :
    pref(“network.cookie.cookieBehavior”, 1);
    pref(“browser.contentblocking.category”, “custom”)

    I’m sharing this because it took me an afternoon to find the culprit. My pleasure. Enjoy (if you may be concerned).

    1. James said on July 1, 2020 at 11:50 am

      @Tom Hawack

      That sounds like it could be a bug. Perhaps you can report it on Bugzilla.

      @All

      How many still have not received version 78 via auto-update?

  14. Marcin said on June 30, 2020 at 10:31 pm

    1h remaining before July 1st, and Menu > Help > About still says 77 is up to date.

    1. Marcin said on July 1, 2020 at 5:14 pm

      Finally got it now at July 1st, 5PM, directly 78.0.1.

      No memories of such a delay between reading an update is available and got it concretly.
      This might be a good explanation : https://www.ghacks.net/2020/07/01/mozilla-pauses-firefox-78-0-rollout-prepares-firefox-78-0-1/

  15. Anonymous said on July 1, 2020 at 2:14 am

    Let’s face it when Apple and Google (and now also MS) decided against Gecko as foundation for their own browser efforts it was just a matter of time for Firefox/Mozilla to become a sub-par product. They just cannot compete with all that corporate money.

    1. Iron Heart said on July 1, 2020 at 7:29 am

      Mozilla is not exactly a small operation, either, even though they try to appear that way. They receive $500.000.000 p.a. from Google:

      https://techcrunch.com/2017/11/14/mozilla-terminates-its-deal-with-yahoo-and-makes-google-the-default-in-firefox-again/?guccounter=1

  16. bobi said on July 1, 2020 at 1:07 pm

    Martin review protocol HTTP/3 and QUIC on Firefox Nightly https://blog.cloudflare.com/how-to-test-http-3-and-quic-with-firefox-nightly/

  17. Samanto Hermes said on July 2, 2020 at 12:25 am

    https://hacks.mozilla.org/2020/06/a-new-regexp-engine-in-spidermonkey/

    > As of the writing of this post, SpiderMonkey is using the very latest version of Irregexp, imported from the V8 repository, with no changes other than mechanically rewritten #include statements

    Wow…

    1. Iron Heart said on July 2, 2020 at 10:52 am

      @Samanto Hermes

      Seems like Moonchild of the Pale Moon project wasn’t wrong here in his first line:

      https://forum.palemoon.org/viewtopic.php?f=70&t=24655&p=192854#p192854

      Mozilla ports more and more Blink and V8 code to Gecko / SpiderMonkey. Their browser is largely irrelevant now, but they need still web developers to support them. Their solution to this problem is aligning their own stuff with Chromium more and more, until they fully switch to Blink / V8, I guess. But as long as they maintain the Gecko branding, the diehards (including those on this very website) will continue to claim that they are heroically fighting their sponsor right now, even if their engine consists of 80% Blink / V8 code. “It’s not Google wah wah!” – And yet it is, lol.

      I fully expect them to switch to Blink / V8 in the mid term while still sticking the “Gecko / SpiderMonkey” branding on it, as everything else would lose them their fairly fanatical diehards. Only few people see through it.

  18. zahra ayat said on July 2, 2020 at 12:14 pm

    hello every one.
    hello martin.
    i read in your website that disabling multiprocess is not available anymore since firefox 68.
    but, in that time, some users said that in about:config
    they change the number of
    dom.ipc.processCount
    in to one
    and multiprocess became disable for them!
    i wish to know that is this preference still available in firefox 78?
    and does it really work for disabling multiprocess feature?
    i appreciate any help, i really need the answer for my questions, God bless you!