LastPass increases price of Premium plan again - gHacks Tech News

LastPass increases price of Premium plan again

LastPass increased the price of the Premium plan of its password management service in February 2019; this time to $3 per month for a Premium plan, an increase by $1 per month.

LastPass is the maker of a popular password management service. Free and paid versions of LastPass are available, and Home users may upgrade accounts to a Premium or Family plans.

The Premium version adds features such as encrypted file storage, emergency access, advanced multi-factor authentication options, and priority tech support to the feature set. LastPass enabled mobile access for free accounts in 2015, and  removed the free account limitation that restricted sync operations to device classes (e.g. PC to PC, but not PC to mobile).

lastpass price increase

Families support up to six users as opposed to the single user that a Premium license supports. It furthermore includes access to a family manager dashboard and unlimited shared folders.

LastPass Premium's price is $3 per month if paid annually as of February 2019. LastPass increased the price from $2 per month to $3 per month in February for existing and new users; this is the second premium price increase after the increase from $1 per month to $2 per month in 2017. Both increases came after LogMeIn's acquisition of LastPass in late 2015.

The new price took effect for new customers on February 7, 2019. Existing customers have to pay the new price when they renew the plan. LastPass sends out reminders 30-days before the expiration of a plan to notify users about the upcoming renewal.

Price comparison

An increase from $1 to $3 per month in two years is certainly something that does not look too good on paper. Compared to other premium password manager offerings, it is not too expensive, however.

Dashlane charges $5 per month for Dashlane Premium, 1Password $2.99 per month (and $4.99 for Families), Enpass asks for one-time payments for individual platforms ($11.99 per platform), and BitWarden charges $1 per month for its Family plan (there is no Premium plan).

KeePass, which I use, is available for free.

LastPass' price matches that of the competition for the most part. Enpass' decision to charge users a one-time fee deserves commendation in a world in which most companies move to subscription-based services.

Closing Words

The LastPass Families price remained as it was; it costs just $1 more per month and gives customers access to five additional Premium accounts.

The price increase moves LastPass' premium offering in line with its competition.

Now You: Do you use LastPass Premium or another password manager / service? How much would you pay for such a service? (via Caschy)

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LastPass increases price of Premium plan again
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LastPass increases price of Premium plan again
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LastPass increased the price of the Premium plan of its password management service in February 2019 ; this time to $3 per month for a Premium plan, an increase by $1 per month.
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Comments

  1. Sam said on March 5, 2019 at 11:38 am
    Reply

    Enpass is just too featureful and cheap (though not free) to not be recommended.

  2. Harro Glööckler said on March 5, 2019 at 11:52 am
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    Rofl didn’t they promise there would be no more price hikes after the last backlash? Anyways, i didn’t renew my premium at the last price increase and will be using free version until they discontinue it…they will sooner or later because LogMeIn is greedy.

  3. slumbergod said on March 5, 2019 at 12:31 pm
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    Greed.

  4. Shiva said on March 5, 2019 at 1:00 pm
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    I’ve just installed Keepass and I’m using Kee to quickly set some account (not related to money) at the moment. I have doubts choosing the master password lenght considering that could be a little annoying with lockdown mode options enabled and the need to use often autotype function; like this old discussion: https://sourceforge.net/p/keepass/discussion/329221/thread/5f50ab5f/.
    There is KeePassQuickUnlock plugin, but I’m not able to make it works.

  5. ES said on March 5, 2019 at 1:06 pm
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    I’m glad I’m using KeePass.
    Much more secure, open-sourced and FREE.

  6. Emanon said on March 5, 2019 at 1:13 pm
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    LastPass has nothing on KeePass, plus having your passwords in a Cloud Database is a huge security risk by itself.

  7. Passaway said on March 5, 2019 at 2:05 pm
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    I’ll pass… and for the noobs keeping their passwords in cloud I say: good luck.

  8. charn said on March 5, 2019 at 2:07 pm
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    Another popular and secure alternative (also open-source) is Bitwarden. Even better, it supports importing passwords from LP.

    1. Richard said on March 5, 2019 at 8:17 pm
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      I switched to bitwarden and could not be more satisfied. Works perfectly across platforms.

      1. Matt said on June 14, 2019 at 9:09 pm
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        I’m about too. Lastpass is a greedy joke. No way the crap they’ve implemented requires a $12/yr increase as they boast millions of clients. I actually had them put me back on their old UI because the new one sucks. That’s easily millions of dollars more just by the $1/mo that users are likely not to scoff at. However, it’ll be $60 before you know it.

  9. john clas said on March 5, 2019 at 2:15 pm
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    have used password safe for years with zero problems. i dont trust the cloud, its just someone else’s computer.

  10. Clairvaux said on March 5, 2019 at 2:15 pm
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    That’s the reason why the cloud, and so-called subscriptions, should be avoided. Get yourself locked into a system you can’t do without, and watch the provider do anything he wants. Then multiply by 10, 100 or whatever, because everybody is trying to pull the same scam on you.

    1. Apparition said on March 5, 2019 at 4:58 pm
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      Kind of difficult since mostly everything uses subscriptions now.

    2. Matt said on June 14, 2019 at 9:10 pm
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      Agreed! They do it just like all the big corps that buy out these small businesses. I hope Bitwarden doesn’t do that.

  11. Alan said on March 5, 2019 at 2:36 pm
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    The cost of labor, taxes, insurance, equipment, etc., increases every year, three bucks a month doesn’t seem too unreasonable. I don’t think I’d use the word “greedy”. Use Keepass or another free service you can trust, quit complaining for heavens sake.

    1. Clairvaux said on March 5, 2019 at 2:51 pm
      Reply

      “The cost of labor, taxes, insurance, equipment, etc., increases every year.”

      Not by 200 % over 2 years. Is LastPass in Venezuela ?

      I love it when people who can afford things berate people who can’t, just for mentioning it.

      Also : it is a question of principle, and sound budgeting. While leasing software and equipment might make sense for a company, that business model has spread into the consumer market big time. For products and services where it’s completely unjustified. Of course, the bait is that 3 $ a month is “nothing”. However, “nothing” multiplied many times is a lot, and suddenly you’re in the red.

      1. Alan said on March 5, 2019 at 3:55 pm
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        I’m offended that you’re offended.

      2. Anonymous said on March 5, 2019 at 5:23 pm
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        “Not by 200 % over 2 years. Is LastPass in Venezuela ?”

        Mister Clairvaux, the incorrigible “redresseur de torts” still on the hunt for the last “gauchiste”, to “make our planet great again”.

      3. Clairvaux said on March 5, 2019 at 10:20 pm
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        @ Some anonymous person

        “Mister Clairvaux, the incorrigible “redresseur de torts” still on the hunt for the last “gauchiste”, to “make our planet great again”.”

        For some reason, silly leftist trolls often insist in coming out of the French woodwork, on this blog. Yes, Mister Leftist, when a product goes from 1 $ to 3 $, that’s a 200 % price increase. It’s a fact, not a political opinion. Also, the price of doing business has not gone up 200 % in 2 years in the United States, where Last Pass is incorporated. That’s whether you like Donald Trump or not (whom I did not mention, and is completely irrelevant to the discussion). That, too, is called a fact.

        I was just addressing Alan’s argument justifying the price hike by the fact that “the cost of labor, taxes, insurance, equipment, etc., increases every year.”

        That lame excuse would have worked in Venezuela, where the IMF estimates that inflation will hit 10 million percent this year. That’s also a fact. But thanks for confirming that leftists despise facts and figures, and try to troll the conversation whenever one of their idolized models are mentioned in an unflattering context.

      4. Anonymous said on March 6, 2019 at 12:54 pm
        Reply

        “That lame excuse would have worked in Venezuela, where the IMF estimates that inflation will hit 10 million percent this year. That’s also a fact. But thanks for confirming that leftists despise facts and figures, and try to troll the conversation whenever one of their idolized models are mentioned in an unflattering context.”

        In Venezuela they have to endure the blocus, without blocus in USA “your dette” in 2017 was +20 000 milliards de dollars but probably more. You should compare what is comparable, also since for money you depend on China you should be less arrogant IMO.

      5. Anonymous said on March 6, 2019 at 1:02 pm
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        And I prefer do not talk about the subprime mortgage crisis in 2008 your spreaded all over the world killing million of people. You economic model is really evil.

      6. fb_galaxy5 said on March 8, 2019 at 2:31 am
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        @Clairvaux If you like in US, maybe you will realize the price of most things increase every year. It is abnormal to see it stay the same, like McDonald’s dollar menu.

        “Also : it is a question of principle, and sound budgeting.”
        That is why he mentioned the free alternative called KeePass.

      7. Clairvaux said on March 8, 2019 at 1:18 pm
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        @ b_galaxy5

        “@Clairvaux If you like [live ?] in [the] US, maybe you will realize the price of most things increase every year. It is abnormal to see it stay the same, like McDonald’s dollar menu.”

        OK, let’s unpick that. Boring and obvious, I know, but education is necessary.

        In the United States of America (once again), “things” don’t increase by 200 % in 2 years. They just don’t. That’s a fact. You could be a communist, or a fascist, or a Buddhist, or a Thatcherite midget with a brain tumor, and that still would be true.

        Then you go on to say : “It is abnormal to see it stay the same, like McDonald’s dollar menu.”

        Wait, wait : what does abnormal mean ? You mean, you get to say by how much McDonald should increase its prices, because not increasing them ruins your theory, and theory should take precedence over facts ?

        Do you even know what a fact is ? Do you know that arguments, and even opinions, should be based on facts ?

        “That is why he mentioned the free alternative called KeePass.”

        That is why I use the free (and donation-taking) alternative called Kee Pass. It’s also because I don’t need the extra features offered by an online password manager, the main of which being sync between devices.

        As a matter of fact, many (most ?) people need that, and that’s the reason why Kee Pass does not reign supreme. And why some users are legitimately annoyed when their password service’s price explodes by 200 %. Even if the absolute amount is “not much”. Other people’s money is always “not much”.

      8. Matt said on June 14, 2019 at 9:13 pm
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        Alan is likely one working for or running such a company. The inflation rate is not that high. My rates don’t increase like that and I raise them as my vendors raise them. However, it’s all about greed. Get people locked in, watch the volume increase and then increase the prices as you will. That’s not capitalism, that capitalism drive by pure greed.

    2. BM said on March 5, 2019 at 4:27 pm
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      A reasonable response finally. The same people complaining of the “greed” would gladly sell their home or used car or their labor for the max they can get. It seems “greed” is a one way street for them.

  12. badbanana said on March 5, 2019 at 2:59 pm
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    i’m a current Last Pass (free) user and am glad i didn’t pay. the damned thing would logout itself randomly and sometimes won’t login.

    i’m looking to find a replacement.

    1. aboan said on March 5, 2019 at 6:28 pm
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      I’ve switched to bitwarden

  13. lewkon said on March 5, 2019 at 3:13 pm
    Reply

    Last :D LastPass I used in 2015/2016. Since 2016 only Safe-in-cloud. Free for PC/Mac, one-pay (no monthly fees) for mobile. Unlocked by password, fingerprint, Touch ID, or Face ID. Synced with cloud Google Drive, Dropbox, OneDrive, or your own NAS server (via WebDAV).

  14. chuck said on March 5, 2019 at 3:16 pm
    Reply

    Glad I got rid of this a while ago.

  15. Paul(us) said on March 5, 2019 at 4:38 pm
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    KeePass all the way!
    Hopefully, Dominik Reichl will in the future also make KeePass available for the antiquated Ms-IE11.

  16. Frustrated said on March 5, 2019 at 4:40 pm
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    Using LastPass free here. Had been a premium user until 2015 and stopped paying once mobile was available on Free. Did not like the poor development process for Firefox which at that time was pre-Quantum. Was glad I did since Logmein purchased Lastpass shortly afterwards and having past experience with Logmein shafting people with price increases.

  17. GrownupMillenial said on March 5, 2019 at 6:06 pm
    Reply

    KeePass is an excelent option for any tech savvy, as I can use it for iPhone, Android, Linux, Mac, Windows. Regretfully for almost everybody LastPass and similar services are their best options.

  18. Janice said on March 5, 2019 at 6:22 pm
    Reply

    Bitwarden. Free or $10/year (or $1/month for families of 5 users). Open source, better UI.

  19. Scott said on March 5, 2019 at 6:40 pm
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    I left Lastpass 6 months ago after using it for years. Not because of price but because of issues on multiple platforms. I moved to Bitwarden and am very happy using it on multiple computers and phones.

    For those who berate others for using cloud based password synch. I don’t believe you understand how it works.

  20. AnorKnee Merce said on March 5, 2019 at 7:44 pm
    Reply

    As a home-user, I am my own “unpaid” Password Manager. I wrote down all my passwords, usernames, associated email accts or phone numbers and security questions(= about 30 p’w) on an A4-sized paper file that has 2-punch-holes. Similarly for my banking PINs and acct numbers.
    ……. My manual password system has lasted problem-free since the days of Win 95.

    I avoid online shopping and banking, online subscription of apps/programs and online cloud storage of my user-data/files.

  21. Chris said on March 5, 2019 at 10:03 pm
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    > BitWarden charges $1 per month for its Family plan (there is no Premium plan).

    Not entirely correct. Bitwarden has both premium and family plans. They do not offer the same features, so you may be required to pay for a per-account premium plan for each account in a family plan (depending on your needs).

  22. Solid said on March 6, 2019 at 2:34 am
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    I mean there is literally a Bitwarden premium level, I’m literally subscribed to it right now.

  23. Barry said on March 6, 2019 at 4:04 am
    Reply

    I use Keepass on my Windows laptop computer, it helped me remember my login credentials. I may try out another password manager for my hand me down macbook air. With a password manager you’ll have to be careful on how you use them. Plus I kept my master-password written down so I won’t lose access. A small notebook works all right, when writing down passwords,
    I plan to order a printer so I can print out two hardcopies, just in case.
    Passwords are tried and true methods of authentication, moving to another methods of logging in are always filled with risks and hiccups. Lose a phone, security key, or suffer a horrible attack/accident, your face or fingerprints would be useless for bio-metrics.

    1. Clairvaux said on March 6, 2019 at 10:04 am
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      Quite right. I feel this is particularly the case for 2FA. It’s great on paper, and theoretically it’s a big step towards better security, but it involves a whole new level of complexity, whom everybody should be aware of before taking the plunge.

      As for fingerprints and such, they are fine as extra protections, but not as primary keys. Also, if your fingerprint is stolen (unlikely, but possible : it’s all over your phone), you can’t change it. Contrary to a password.

      1. Barry said on March 7, 2019 at 10:27 am
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        Going passwordless is going to present challenges, I know several people who don’t have mobile phones and refuse to get mobile phones. But I digress, email providers, apps, smartphones and computers all have backdoors in them. Even though it looks good on paper, there are unexpected hiccups.
        How long would passwords remain optional? It’s anyone best guess, we really don’t know. I suspect that we’re being pushed into mobile authentication. if it’s optional after two years time, its anyone best guess.

      2. Clairvaux said on March 7, 2019 at 10:37 am
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        Troy Hunt of https://havibeenpwned, an MVP who earns his living helping businesses about online security, and spends a good part of his time preventing people from losing control of their passwords, thinks that passwords are here to stay :

        https://www.troyhunt.com/heres-why-insert-thing-here-is-not-a-password-killer/

        Whatever fancy (and even useful) contraptions may be invented to supplement them.

      3. Barry said on March 7, 2019 at 11:31 am
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        Several articles have had touted that the end of passwords, via WebAuthen is just finalized by W3C and fido Alliance. I think it’s bit of early stretch. Though just recently any Android phone with 7.0 and upward is FIDO compliant. However it reminded me of windows 7 and windows 8.1 being touted as windows 10 ready, only to brick a good number of laptops.

        To truly kill the passwords, a person would have to be microchipped on one’s forehead or between the thumb and the finger. But the idea of being chipped like a dog or a product, sends a shiver down my spine. We’re living in interesting times.

        If the passwords remained optional, I would continue using password manager. To ask a question, would be viable for those who have multiple gmail accounts, yahoo, outlook and so forth. A friend of mine had said that it would be difficult to get rid of passwords completely. But I’m still on the fence on that subject. But its possible that we would continue using username and passwords several years down the road

      4. discipler777 said on March 7, 2019 at 2:28 pm
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        Microchip implants = no longer need password or PIN = Bible’s mark-of-the-beast/666.?

      5. Barry said on March 7, 2019 at 9:40 pm
        Reply

        It’s possible that the microchip could be the mark of the beast. Right now there are certain number of employees in Sweden and Germany that can unlock the doors, computers and buy food and drink from vending machines.
        as for my current password manager is keepass, it works all right. I don’t want to tinker around the program, use it as it was built to do. In 2018 a CEO of one of the password managers, can’t remember which one, one head honcho had said that biometrics are not the replacement for passwords, but rather supplement them.
        What looks good on paper can be annoying in real life. Ease of use, my foot, I think we’re being dumbed down. It’s all about instant gratification.
        back to the password manager, it helped me logging in to my accounts. I don’t mind a few seconds looking through the software app for usernames and passwords. CEOs of password managers would continue to promote their products.

  24. Joost said on March 6, 2019 at 11:57 am
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    How about SafeInCloud? They have only one-time payment per platform – Android/Mac and the Windows client is free.

  25. Anonymous said on March 6, 2019 at 1:40 pm
    Reply
  26. Stephen said on March 6, 2019 at 3:13 pm
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    I’ve been a happy LastPass user for a number of years. While I have no use for a Family or the Premium plan I’d be happy to pay $1 / month as a single user. When I asked LastPass customer service why they didn’t offer this option they had no answer but offered to send my request/wish to management. It would seem offering a basic $12 annual account would be a good (i.e., better than nothing) revenue stream.

  27. spacedrone808 said on March 6, 2019 at 8:28 pm
    Reply

    For God sake, who stores passwords in 3-rd party service and moreover pay for this? Insane.

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