ORBX.js could revolutionize the web, and Mozilla is involved - gHacks Tech News

ORBX.js could revolutionize the web, and Mozilla is involved

Several major operating system platforms exist that are not really compatible with each other. You can't run Windows programs and games on Apple's iPad, or iPhone apps on Google's Android operating system. The hardware imposes another limitation on developers, so that you won't see a full conversion of Autodesk or the latest computer games on Android or iOS devices in the near future, or ever at all.

All of these limitations can be resolved with streaming technology and while we have seen attempts in the past, especially in the gaming niche, there was none up until now that sounded as promising as ORBX.js. What it does? It enables developers to bring virtually any application they desire to HTML5 capable web browsers regardless of operating system, hardware or form factor (as long as they meet minimum requirements performance-wise). The technology is based on HTML5 and JavaScript ensuring maximum compatibility with the majority of modern desktop and mobile web browsers.

The technology does not require any plugins and can deliver Full HD (1080p) 60 frames per second video stream contents to web browsers supporting HTML5 and JavaScript. Take a look at the two following video demonstrations to see how powerful this new streaming technology can be. The first video highlights how Autodesk can be run on various HTML5 capable web browsers including Chrome OS, Firefox and iOS.

The second video displays a user's entire Steam client library in HTML5 in any web browser. This not only means that you can browse the library, but also play the games in it in the browser.

What this may mean is that you will be able to play your Steam games in the future on your iPAD, use Mac, Windows or Linux specific applications on the other operating systems, or work with Adobe Photoshop on your Samsung Android smartphone.

It should be clear that a broadband connection is required to make use of the new technology, and that it is recommended to use a connection that is not metered.

Companies can integrate watermarks into the stream to make sure recipients are authorized to access the streams. This may be enough to get rid of any other form of DRM protection.

With ORBX.js being introduced this week and the previously reviewed Epic Games Unreal Engine 3 demo running in Firefox via asm.js it is almost certain that we will see a big shift towards HTML5 in the coming years.

Mozilla CTO Brendan Eich's take on the new technology makes up for an interesting read in this regard.





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    Comments

    1. Srihari Thalla said on May 4, 2013 at 10:19 am
      Reply

      Awesome! Games in the Browser and platform independent!!

    2. cosmas sabao said on May 4, 2013 at 12:05 pm
      Reply

      How do I load the ORBX.js in an apple iPad so that i can i can install spreadsheets/word documents

    3. 3rdworld said on May 5, 2013 at 12:15 am
      Reply

      “It should be clear that a broadband connection is required to make use of the new technology, and that it is recommended to use a connection that is not metered.”
      As clear as high speed internet connection ONLY?

    4. Caspy7 said on May 5, 2013 at 1:55 am
      Reply

      The comments on Eich’s blog contain more interesting info.

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