Migrate from Bitcomet to uTorrent - gHacks Tech News

Migrate from Bitcomet to uTorrent

I finally decided to give uTorrent another try and switched from my favorite client Bitcomet to it. It seemed to me lately that Bitcomet was using more system resources than before which has been my main incentive to try out the uTorrent client again.Another reason is that Bitcomet is seen by many as a bandwidth stealer due to the options it makes available.

Migrating torrents to uTorrent is a pretty simply procedure. Before you can load them into uTorrent you have to make sure that all extensions that have been added by Bitcomet, or any other client, are removed. Bitcomet for instance adds .bt! at the end of every file if you have selected it in the options. This can be a tedious task if you have many small files that you want to download.

I found a dos batch file in the uTorrent migration guide that is helpful in this case.

  1. Open Notepad and write this line into it (replace "bc!" with which ever file extension you need to remove):
    @for /r %%i in (*.bc!) do @move "%%~fi" "%%~dpni"
  2. In Notepad, File > Save As: RENAME.BAT
  3. Open the location folder for the partially downloaded files you need to rename.
  4. Drag and drop the RENAME.BAT file into this folder
  5. Right click on RENAME.BAT > Open; a DOS window will briefly appear as it scrolls through all the files in the folder as they are getting renamed.

utorrent move torrent to drive

I decided to use the same download dir in uTorrent that I have used in Bitcomet. To change the download location click on Options, Preferences and select Directories from the menu.

Select the directory where your files are currently located in the Put new Downloads in field to make sure that uTorrent finds the partially downloaded files.

After the preparations are finished we have to load the torrents into uTorrent. Bitcomet has a subdirectory named Torrents in its program directory. The torrents are located there by default. Open uTorrent, click on File, Add Torrent and browse to the location where your torrent files are stored. You can alternatively select them all and drag & drop them into the uTorrent interface.

You can select multiple files at once. The torrents are automatically loaded into uTorrent and you should see the Done % go up if you already downloaded part of it with Bitcomet.

And that's it. You successfully migrated from Bitcomet to uTorrent.

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Comments

  1. fastdump said on January 15, 2007 at 12:47 pm
    Reply

    I learnt torrents via Azureus, but changed to the oh so eloquent, lightweight and utterly sufficient μTorrent a long time ago – and I’ve never looked back!

  2. Luke said on January 15, 2007 at 7:21 pm
    Reply

    I still use Azureus – being a Java developer I kinda feel compelled to use it and support it. I never had any issues with it.

    I did check out μTorrent and I think it is a great tool. I especially love the small memory footprint.

  3. yair said on January 17, 2007 at 8:07 am
    Reply

    i have a problem with utorr, it doesnt create folders automaticly for each torrent.
    it did once. other then that i love it.
    and its web gui…

  4. Martin said on January 17, 2007 at 11:13 am
    Reply

    yair check the downloads tab in the options, did you enable Append the torrent’s label to the directory name ?

  5. Josh said on January 24, 2007 at 8:47 am
    Reply

    Have you tried the aforementioned process of renaming files with a dos batch file? If you are seriously interested in providing helpful information, then you should attempt this process yourself! I was rewarded with an obscenity and a string of nonsense numbers. If this is your idea of a joke, I have some obscenities for you! Anyway, just know that I am reporting it to Utorrent, since it was in their FAQs too.

  6. Martin said on January 24, 2007 at 11:50 am
    Reply

    I’m sorry that it did not work for you. You are right that I did not test the batch file because I had already changed every file manually.

    A better way to rename all the files would be to open a cmd prompt, change to the torrent dir and use the command

    ren *.bc! *.

    which would process all files that have the .bc! extension in that dir and remove it.

  7. Koolcat said on October 23, 2008 at 2:49 am
    Reply

    The batch works, however you have to modify the inverted commas (“) as a copy and paste changes these to another character?!

    @for /r %%i in (*.bc!) do @move “%%~fi” “%%~dpni”

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