Pwn2Own 2022: Windows 11, Ubuntu, Firefox, Safari, Tesla and more hacked

Martin Brinkmann
May 21, 2022
Security
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The hacking event Pwn2Own took place from May 18 to May 20 of 2022. This year, security researchers managed to hack Windows 11 and Ubuntu, Firefox, Safari, Microsoft Teams, a Tesla and other targets successfully during the three days of the event.

pwn2own 2022
Source: Zero Day Initiative

Pwn2Own is a yearly event that brings together security researchers from all over the world. On the 15th anniversary of the event, 17 security researchers attempted to exploit 21 targets across multiple categories.

On day 1 of the event, researchers managed to hack Microsoft Teams, Oracle VirtualBox, Mozilla Firefox, Microsoft Windows 11, Apple Safari, and Ubuntu Desktop. Microsoft Teams and Ubuntu Desktop were hacked successfully multiple teams during the day. All attempts were successful on the day.

On day 2,  security researchers hacked the Tesla Model 3 Infotainment System, Ubuntu Desktop and Microsoft windows 11. Ubuntu Desktop was hacked twice successfully. Two hacking attempts against Microsoft Windows 11 and Tesla failed on that day.

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On day 3, hackers managed to exploit Windows 11 and Ubuntu Desktop successfully. Researchers exploited Microsoft's Windows 11 operating system thrice on the day, with no failed attempts.

Mozilla did release an update for the organization's Firefox web browser already. Firefox 100.0.2, Firefox ESR 91.9.1, Firefox for Android 100.3, and Thunderbird 91.9.1 are already available with patches for the reported security vulnerability.

Here is an overview of the successful Windows 11 hacks:

Marcin Wi?zowski was able to execute an out-of-bounds write escalation of privilege on Microsoft Windows 11, earning $40,000 and 4 Master of Pwn points, and high praise on the accompanying whitepaper from the Microsoft team.

Phan Thanh Duy (@PTDuy and Lê H?u Quang Linh (@linhlhq of STAR Labs earned $40K and 4 Master of Pwn points for a Use-After-Free elevation of privilege on Microsoft Windows 11.

T0 was able to successfully show an improper access control bug leading to elevation of privilege on Microsoft Windows 11 - earning $40,000 and 4 Master of Pwn points.

nghiadt12 from Viettel Cyber Security was able to successfully show an escalation of privilege via Integer Overflow on Microsoft Windows 11 - earning $40,000 and 4 Master of Pwn points.

vinhthp1712 successfully achieved Elevation of Privilege via Improper Access Control on Microsoft Windows 11. vinhthp1712 earns $40,000 and 4 Master of Pwn points

On the final attempt of the competition, Bruno PUJOS (@brunopujos) from REverse Tactics successfully achieved Elevation of Privilege via Use-After-Free on Microsoft Windows 11. Bruno earns $40,000 and 4 Master of Pwn points.

Microsoft is expected to release updates for Windows 11 in the coming weeks. A likely target is the June 2022 Patch Day, which is scheduled for June 14, 2022. Critical security issues may be patched earlier by the company, as emergency updates may be released to address issues at any time.

Vendors whose products were attacked during the event "have 90 days to produce a fix" for discovered vulnerabilities, according to the Zero Initiate website.

You may check out the full overview of the event here if you are interested in additional details on specific hacks or links to the hacker profiles of security researchers who participated in the event.

Summary
Pwn2Own 2022: Windows 11, Ubuntu, Firefox, Safari, Tesla and more hacked
Article Name
Pwn2Own 2022: Windows 11, Ubuntu, Firefox, Safari, Tesla and more hacked
Description
The hacking event Pwn2Own took place from May 18 to May 20 of 2022. This year, security researchers managed to hack Windows 11 and Ubuntu, Firefox, Safari, Microsoft Teams, a Tesla and other targets successfully during the three days of the event.
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Ghacks Technology News
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Comments

  1. Arrow said on May 21, 2022 at 9:05 pm
    Reply

    Should I no longer trust firefox?

    1. Andy Prough said on May 21, 2022 at 10:40 pm
      Reply

      You should no longer trust random javascript, which is what these hacks exploited. At a minimum you should be using noscript.

    2. Arrow said on May 21, 2022 at 11:00 pm
      Reply

      Ghacks noscript says unnecessary with i ublock origin

    3. Rick said on May 22, 2022 at 8:06 am
      Reply

      I find it interesting that the word Chrome doesn’t appear in this article or the source article. It apparently wasn’t even attempted, which is seemingly telling. Given the prodigious number of security fixes made to Chrome on practically a weekly basis (see the Chrome release blog), this puzzles me, as surely there are many more to be made.

      1. Arrow said on May 22, 2022 at 9:17 am
        Reply

        I couldn’t get an answer to my question can I trust firefox? is there an alternative?

    4. Mystique said on May 22, 2022 at 10:00 am
      Reply

      I have been trialing out (as I do every now and then) an extension recently called ‘Javascript Firewall’ which got an update recently, it seems okay. It’s definitely within that same user feel as uMatrix. Seems like an interesting extension.

    5. Hitomi said on May 22, 2022 at 11:59 am
      Reply

      Not sure what your logic is here, when the sample size is 1 event and 2 browser bugs. Certainly this is not enough to go on for such a gross generalization.

      [https://googleprojectzero.blogspot.com/2022/04/the-more-you-know-more-you-know-you.html]
      >2021 included the detection and disclosure of 58 in-the-wild 0-days, the most ever recorded since Project Zero began tracking in mid-2014.

    6. alsa said on May 23, 2022 at 9:27 am
      Reply

      > Should I no longer trust firefox?

      Wait, you trust any software or hardware, do you believe in fairy tales still?

      Security is a myth boyo.

      1. Arrow said on May 23, 2022 at 7:01 pm
        Reply

        i love fairy tales

    7. MBK said on May 23, 2022 at 1:54 pm
      Reply

      Security bugs happen every now and then and their existence alone is not a good measurement if the software is secure or not. What matters more is how vendors respond when the issues are disclosed (work on fixing them or act like nothing happened). The best you can do is keep your software up to date (The Firefox bug demonstrated is already patched in 100.2 and ESR 91.9.1 releases).

  2. Yuliya said on May 21, 2022 at 9:06 pm
    Reply

    The more crap you add to an OS, the more potential security issues you expose it to:
    Windows 7 (extended support only): 27 vulnerabilities: 3 critical and 24 important
    Windows 8.1: 34 vulnerabilities: 4 critical and 30 important
    Windows 10 version 1909: 43 vulnerabilities: 4 critical and 39 important
    Windows 10 version 20H2, 21H1 and 21H2 : 44 vulnerabilities, 4 critical and 40 important
    Windows 11: 44 vulnerabilities, 5 critical and 39 important
    See a trend? They should pursue to make the OS lighter and have a smaller footprint, instead they are doing the exact opposite. A silly trend which Microsoft is not alone in following, annoyingly.

    1. Anonymous said on May 21, 2022 at 9:30 pm
      Reply

      Glad I use Windows 7 still. The last usable OS from Microsoft.

    2. Clairvaux said on May 22, 2022 at 2:34 am
      Reply

      @ Yuliya

      Ha ! If this list is anything to go by, then I’m glad I stuck with unsupported Windows 7, which has the least vulnerabilities of all.

      Would you have a link to the source, so that I can understand better the meaning of those figures ? Thanks !

    3. Hitomi said on May 22, 2022 at 12:04 pm
      Reply

      Again a gross generalization. What is the time-frame of your data? Did you really just use the patch notes for May as your sample size?

      When all the focus and developers are looking at the up-to-date OS like Windows 10 and 11, then surely you find more bugs there. Obviously you find most bugs where you most actively look.

      1. Hitomi said on May 22, 2022 at 12:08 pm
        Reply

        Besides Windows 10 and 11 are the same OS. You can even tell in CMD that the version number starts with 10. In the registry node called:
        HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion
        the “ProductName” key of Windows 11 reads Windows 10. It is a theme pack with extra telemetry.
        So I am not surprised 10 and 11 both have 44 bugs in May, it’s the logical consequence. The 11 version was released so 10 can be retired and business customers can pay up again?

  3. John G. said on May 21, 2022 at 9:45 pm
    Reply

    Why didn’t they hack McOS? :|

  4. Bobo said on May 21, 2022 at 10:13 pm
    Reply

    Multigazillion trillion billion companies giving away small change for HUGE help from the hackers. Ridiculous to get only 40 grand, they should give four HUNDRED grand per case and it wouldn’t even sting in the their bankaccount one bit. Cheapskates. They probably pay their own developers and programmers 40 grand per month, and those people are the ones causing all these bugs and loopholes with their extreme incompetence. But hey, at least they are all black yellow red bi gay trans muslim and vegan so we’re all good!

  5. Anonymous said on May 22, 2022 at 3:43 am
    Reply

    I guess DOD wont be migrating to W11 anytime soon.

  6. ncsufan said on May 22, 2022 at 4:40 pm
    Reply

    Anonymous said on May 21, 2022 at 9:30 pm
    REPLY
    Glad I use Windows 7 still. The last usable OS from Microsoft.

    Actually its not the last usable OS from microsoft – I use winxp and according to some sites there are still a few win3.1 users. Granted there are errors and problems with the earlier stuff but they are usable.

  7. computer said no said on May 22, 2022 at 11:11 pm
    Reply

    I find it curious that we rely simply on one organisation’s hack attempts and we all take it as god’s given gospel.

    What conditions and criteria were used.?
    We the simple users do not know such things and rely on blind trust and the utterances of a centralised hack attempt.

    I take these tests like most of them with a large grain of salt.

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