It appears that the Windows 7 ESU Bypass is indeed working - gHacks Tech News

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It appears that the Windows 7 ESU Bypass is indeed working

Support for Microsoft's Windows 7 operating system ended on January 14, 2020 officially. Home users cannot extend support for the operating system while business and Enterprise customers may extend support by up to three years; this is done by joining the ESU program which is available per machine (business) or per user (Enterprise).

A bypass to use ESU-only patches on Home machines -- basically any machine that has not joined the program officially -- was discovered and published in December 2019. The bypass worked with the test ESU patch that Microsoft released but it was not clear back then if it would also work with "real" patches.

Now that the first post-Windows 7 support patch has been released, confirmations are coming in that the bypass is indeed working.

bypass security updates checks

Note: we suggest that backups are created of important data, better the entire system, before the bypass or any of the updates that Microsoft released for Windows 7 are installed. If something goes wrong, it is then possible to go back to the previous version without losing any data.

The process of using the bypass with the Windows 7 patches released in February would look like this (note that you should not install the latest SSU KB4537829 as the bypass does not seem to work anymore if it is installed).

  1. Install the bypass. You can grab the latest version from the MDL forum (account needed), or download it from Gitlab. The password is 2020.
  2. Download and install the ESU Test update KB4528069. It should install fine.
  3. Restart the System.
  4. Install the following updates: KB4538483, KB4537820, KB4537767, and KB4537813.
  5. Restart the system.

Our colleagues over at Deskmodder found another option that supports the installation of the latest SSU:

  1. Install the bypass.
  2. Install the ESU Test update.
  3. Remove the bypass.
  4. Install the SSU KB4537829.
  5. Install the KB4537820 update.

Closing Words

It remains to be seen if the bypass will continue to work in the coming months or years.For now, it may be an option in some situations provided that backups are created.

Now You: Are you still running Windows 7? Have you tried the bypass?

Summary
It appears that the Windows 7 ESU Bypass is indeed working
Article Name
It appears that the Windows 7 ESU Bypass is indeed working
Description
The Windows 7 ESU bypass to install ESU-only updates for the operating system appears to be working just fine.
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Ghacks Technology News
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Comments

  1. EP said on February 13, 2020 at 8:13 am
    Reply

    it appears that KB4528069 has been pulled from the ms update catalog (at least searching for KB4528069 now yields no results)

  2. Anonymous said on February 13, 2020 at 8:21 am
    Reply

    Published on websites Microsoft probably monitor. I think I’ll Pass, thanks.

  3. Addy T. said on February 13, 2020 at 8:44 am
    Reply

    Yes, I do run Windows 7. I have also never installed any security updates, not even the Wanna Cry one. No problem. MSE finds nothing (yes, full scan).

    P.S. I learned that WIndows 10’s WordPad is now getting ads, too.
    https://winaero.com/blog/wordpad-is-gettings-ads-in-windows-10/

    1. Anonymous said on February 19, 2020 at 8:25 pm
      Reply

      If no one has ever broken into your house then it’s also a good idea to continue to leave your doors open 24/7.

      Also, please can you reply with your bank account details.

      You’ll be fine, nothing ever happens to idiots.

  4. Anorknee Merce said on February 13, 2020 at 8:51 am
    Reply

    For Win 7 home-users, Windows Update is malware since the release of Win 10 in July 2015, eg GWX KB3035583 and processor-blocking updates(= Win 7 cannot be updated if running on Intel Kabylake or newer).

    For Win 7 enterprise-users, the above bypass should be useful since they are high-value targets to hackers and ransomwarers = no need to pay M$ to upgrade to Win 10 Ent.
    .

  5. Anon said on February 13, 2020 at 8:56 am
    Reply

    Of course it was MDL. Damn, I love those guys.

  6. anon2 said on February 13, 2020 at 9:06 am
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    flip side of the coin is, by advertising this illegal bypass, could be classed as an accessory to commit computer fraud by broadcasting it.

    1. Iggie said on February 13, 2020 at 11:23 am
      Reply

      Yeah, because that’s going to happen…. don’t be such a drama queen. At very most they’ll tell them to take the script down but they know it’s everywhere now.

      The second way to install looks like the one to use. They could change something to break the script but once installed looks like that method allows you to keep SSU up to date without the bypass so not sure they can do anything about it.

    2. lorty said on February 25, 2020 at 8:46 am
      Reply

      @anon2

      This isn’t 1998. Corps don’t go after such anymore, otherwise they get slammed with bad PR in social.

  7. Bobo said on February 13, 2020 at 9:25 am
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    I can just imagine how everyone in Redmond is now assigned to battle this. Someone poked the anthill with a biiiig stick and the ants are losing their s**t =) Wow, imagine that, a few billion fully functional computers could be patched for free for a long time.. Now imagine if Windows 10 was actually a GOOD product and none of this would be an issue anywhere, ever.. Imagine that..
    I think the first Windows 10 meeting went like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5auEs8o32w

    1. pop said on February 13, 2020 at 11:31 am
      Reply

      What are you talking about? They aren’t going to spend much if any resources to “battle” or be losing their **** this as a few billion people aren’t going to be patching, a relatively few are. The vast, vast majority won’t ever know about it. It’s not even that long a time, 3 years.

    2. imagine said on February 25, 2020 at 8:50 am
      Reply

      @Bobo

      The low limit of your imagination is limited by your low level of understanding.

      Imagine that and understand.

  8. Jeff said on February 13, 2020 at 9:29 am
    Reply

    Note that the more you patch Windows 7, the slower it gets on older CPUs due to CPU vulnerabilities. If you are smart about avoiding malware, you can easily survive without patching. And you can’t run Windows 7 on newer CPUs anyway. There was a significant slowdown after patches: https://msfn.org/board/topic/177526-windows-81-patch-performance-findings-not-surpisingly-the-latest-patches-are-costly Storage I/O especially takes a hit.

    1. popcorn said on February 13, 2020 at 5:12 pm
      Reply

      Spectre and Meltdown mitigations can be disabled with a click using InSpectre by GRC.

      1. Jeff said on February 13, 2020 at 8:15 pm
        Reply

        What about the other CPU vulnerabilities – Foreshadow, Speculative Store Bypass, Lazy FP state restore, Microarchitectural Data Sampling etc?

      2. BrianG said on February 17, 2020 at 9:45 pm
        Reply

        Windows 7 doesn’t get those mitigations anyway, unless you add them yourself, perhaps via a BIOS update.

    2. jern said on February 13, 2020 at 5:19 pm
      Reply

      When Win10 came out I took my Win7 machine completely offline. I did a clean install and shut down all security – antivirus, firewall, everything. My computer has an old Pentium CPU but with all the bloat turned off it runs my CAD program without effort and disk access is speedy. Computers really are powerful instruments if we don’t bog them down.

  9. Jaolin said on February 13, 2020 at 10:30 am
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    Hell will freeze over before I look sideways at Windows telemetry edition.

    1. ZeN said on February 13, 2020 at 1:00 pm
      Reply

      Educate yourself, and relax. Paranoia is self-harm.

      1. Sam said on February 13, 2020 at 2:35 pm
        Reply

        Zen it’s you who should educate yourself, really do it.

      2. ZeN said on February 13, 2020 at 7:05 pm
        Reply

        You have no idea of the vastness of the worlds digital infrastructure, do you Sam? You will be chasing your tail for eternity my friend.

        What have you got (as an Individual) that MS desperately wants? It’s nothing isn’t it!
        As for ‘The Man’ or ‘They’, unless you are a threat to a nations security or a major (not minor) pedaller in the usual drugs, weapons, under-age graphic material, etc, ‘they’ just ain’t interested mate. You are just a speck amongst other specks on a unimaginable scale on the digital landscape, Unless you’ve got something worth stealing, you’re wasting your precious existence on BS.
        -Z-

      3. Giacomo said on February 13, 2020 at 3:24 pm
        Reply

        Caring about privacy is not bad.

      4. ZeN said on February 14, 2020 at 9:35 am
        Reply

        to an extent, I agree, but some of the drivel on here is ludicrous.

      5. DavidJ said on February 14, 2020 at 2:07 pm
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        Agreed! these tinfoilers crack me up! :)

  10. Kwasiarz said on February 13, 2020 at 11:45 am
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    I wonder if the same thing can be done on Vista to be able to keep installing Server 2008 updates on it?

    1. kaskuser said on February 13, 2020 at 10:17 pm
      Reply

      Yes. The bypass are available somewhere.

  11. NotSheep said on February 13, 2020 at 2:02 pm
    Reply

    Seems to me, Jaolin, has educated himself/herself by their comment. Also, seems by your comment, you need to further educate yourself on this matter, or not, it’s your loss.

    1. ZeN said on February 13, 2020 at 7:08 pm
      Reply

      What loss? You are deluded, (read the above).

  12. Guilherme said on February 13, 2020 at 2:21 pm
    Reply

    Is this Bypass safe to install?
    Or are there any possible malware on it?

  13. Yuliya said on February 13, 2020 at 3:23 pm
    Reply
  14. sqrly1@hotmail.com said on February 13, 2020 at 3:33 pm
    Reply

    You say “bypass”, I’m sure microsoft says “copyright circumvention”.

    I’m suprised you’d make such a dumb move. I don’t wish to see your site blocked :(

    1. Yuliya said on February 13, 2020 at 5:17 pm
      Reply

      Microsoft bats an eye usually to things common users don’t tend to do. For example activating their Enterprise, LTS and Server Windows builds is quite effort-less. They don’t care, most people have no idea how to get their hands on these editions. Pirating Windows Home?.. yeah, good luck with that. Home is a pain in the.. rear to hacktivate. Especially in a non-instrusive way.

  15. Josh said on February 13, 2020 at 10:31 pm
    Reply

    Installed fine on my Windows 7 machine. No way i’m upgrading to that low-grade Windows 10 trash.

  16. OldNavyGuy said on February 13, 2020 at 11:21 pm
    Reply

    As Lawrence Abrams posted in a BleepingComputer article recently, the bypass is illegal.

    Lost some respect for Ghacks today.

    1. Yuliya said on February 13, 2020 at 11:51 pm
      Reply

      Since when is it illegal to modify the content of your storage device?

      1. OldNavyGuy said on February 14, 2020 at 8:54 am
        Reply

        Since that modification is being used to steal ESU support that has not been paid for.

      2. Yuliya said on February 14, 2020 at 12:48 pm
        Reply

        Well, there’s no way for you to pay for that support, so there is that. It is not available for consumers.

      3. OldNavyGuy said on February 15, 2020 at 1:48 am
        Reply

        It is available to consumers…do the research.

        I know…it’s harder work than ripping off an ESU license.

      4. M. Paquet said on February 15, 2020 at 5:32 pm
        Reply

        @OldNavyGuy

        « It is available to consumers…do the research. »

        Really? Please, enlighten us…

      5. Yuliyas_Wifes_Boyfriend said on February 14, 2020 at 3:27 pm
        Reply

        Do you foresee Microsoft going bankrupt after a dozen nerds patch their operating system?

        Ghacks is gangsta, they have gained my respect today

      6. OldNavyGuy said on February 15, 2020 at 2:21 am
        Reply

        Microsoft going bankrupt is not the point.

        This is a paid licensing program for extended support…it’s not free.

        I’m sure the hack will be shut down sooner or later.

        When that happens, your choices will be backup your Windows 7 shit regularly and pray, upgrade to Windows 10, or move to Linux.

      7. criket said on February 16, 2020 at 5:56 am
        Reply

        “Microsoft going bankrupt is not the point.”

        No! The point is that we have paid or a product that has been made obsolete and they forced us to “upgrade” to a product that steal our privacy. The point is you don’t have the control you were suposed to have over a product you have paid with your hard earned money.
        The fact that what we have or don’t to hide presents no interrest for Microsoft or BigBrother is irelevant. What is relevant is that MY PRIVACY IS MINE and I should do with it as I please.
        I should be the one to decide who can access my data and who can’t (unless they have a Court Order).

      8. Jody Thornton said on February 16, 2020 at 9:19 pm
        Reply

        @cricket:

        You paid for the license to use Windows 7 under the terms of the licensing agreement. Now Microsoft is withdrawing support for Windows 7. And they’re not stealing your privacy. You agree (again) to the terms of the agreement to use Windows 10. Telelmetry is gathered by ALL software products now.

        You guys get this idea that you OWN your copy of Windows 7 and should use it however you like it. That’s not how software licenses work.

  17. vonmir said on February 14, 2020 at 11:23 am
    Reply

    OldNavyGuy said on February 14, 2020 at 8:54 am …

    “Since that modification is being used to steal ESU support that has not been paid for.”

    I understand your point. However, Microsoft makes the *update files* available for free.

    I readily confess that I’m not a lawyer. Furthermore, I haven’t gone through the Microsoft website exhaustively to ascertain their legal position regarding the use of the update files.

    I’ve tried to read through this page: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/legal/intellectualproperty/copyright/default.aspx

    I found this sentence relevant: “An end user will be unable to install any Software that is accompanied by or includes a License Agreement, unless he or she first agrees to the License Agreement terms.”

    Maybe I’m splitting hairs here, but using the bypass seems to get around the phrase “… will be unable …” Indeed, the bypass users have apparently been able to “to install … Software that is accompanied by or includes a License Agreement, unless he or she first agrees to the License Agreement terms.”

    Just out of interest, could you please provide some background to your contention that installing update files downloaded from the Windows Update Catalog is “stealing” in the legal sense?

    In closing, I’m not trying to justify anything here. I think, though, that before someone is accused of stealing, the legal details have to be considered comprehensively.

    Thank you.

    1. OldNavyGuy said on February 15, 2020 at 1:52 am
      Reply

      ESU licenses, and the updates that come with that license, are purchased…they are not free.

      Hacks to “fake” an ESU license, to get the updates for free, is theft.

      1. vonmir said on February 16, 2020 at 2:59 pm
        Reply

        OldNavyGuy wrote, “ESU licenses, and the updates that come with that license, are purchased…they are not free.”

        Excuse me, but I can’t follow your logic and argument that the updates “come with” the license. To me, though admittedly perhaps wrongly, your contention is inaccurate and linguistically imprecise.

        The updates are available for free to the world via the Windows update catalog. One’s “entitlement” to install them appears to come with the original LEGAL acquisition of a Windows 7 license. I do not question for a moment the fact that anyone using a cracked version of Windows is “stealing”.

        As for the ESU license, my understanding is that it enables license holders to install these updates. I confess I’m not sure whether this is an entitlement that’s exclusive to these license holders; I have not read the ESU license agreement.

        Anyway, in my understanding of the process, the bypass does not “fake” anything. Like the license, it enables one to install the updates. Whether it entitles them to do so is another matter; whether it enjoins them from doing so is the question at hand.

        Your argument reflects your opinion, which – I don’t deny – might yet prove to be correct. I, however, would like some type of “evidence” that unequivocally proves that installing the updates that Microsoft provides for free on its website is illegal.

        At least here in Europe, legal decisions are based upon statute and contractual terms, not personal opinion.

        I guess what I’m looking for is a statement from Microsoft that says that the end of support for Windows 7 also terminates the right of holders of a legally acquired version of the program to install updates that occur beyond the end of the support.

        Thank you for your ongoing interest in this discussion. I apologize for my long-winded post. :-(

  18. nab said on February 14, 2020 at 5:59 pm
    Reply

    if i left my win7 unpatched for 3 years now, do you think it’d be worth updating with WSUS or simplix now ?
    feeling kinda lazy, and i don’t like to fix something which ain’t broken if you know what i mean…

    1. Peterc said on February 15, 2020 at 5:43 am
      Reply

      @nab: Tough call. As someone mentioned earlier, some CPUs take a performance hit from Meltdown and Spectre patches, ranging from minor to significant. On one computer I kept up to date (with security-only updates using WSUS Offline Update), the hit was minor. On another computer (using the same updating method, but with a patched BIOS), the hit was *really significant*.

      If you’re worried about performance, you could blacklist all of the Meltdown- and Spectre-related updates in WSUS Offline Update and install all of the other missing security-only updates. (You’ll have to read how to do it. From memory, it involves creating a specially named text file in a specific subfolder and typing or pasting KB numbers into it.) If you run Belarc Advisor, that should give you a list of most of the security updates you’re missing and I *think* you should be able to pick out the Meltdown-and Spectre related ones from Microsoft’s own documentation, which Belarc’s list links to. (If not, you’ll have to search for a comprehensive listing on the Web.)

      I’d be cautious about installing non-security-only (“Security and Quality”) updates unless you identify a specific need for them. In short, If you use WSUS Offline Update, I’d recommend enabling the “security-only updates” option. (I don’t know whether Simplix has a security-only switch; I didn’t see one on Simplix’s Russian-language webpage.) And maybe just turn off Internet Explorer as a Windows feature.

      Tip for WSUS Offline Update: At each Windows 7 post-reboot Welcome Screen throughout the updating process, give the computer ample time to finish handling background tasks before logging in, and after each log-in give the computer yet more time to finish handling *other* background tasks before actually doing anything. And when the entire updating process is completed, do at least one *extra* reboot. Otherwise, you risk running into weird glitches from certain “autostart” services and tasks not loading.

      Definitely clone or image your system drive BEFORE doing such a massive update, in case something goes badly wrong. Macrium Reflect Free is pretty good.

      1. OldNavyGuy said on February 15, 2020 at 7:43 am
        Reply

        “Tip for WSUS Offline Update: At each Windows 7 post-reboot Welcome Screen throughout the updating process, give the computer ample time to finish handling background tasks before logging in, and after each log-in give the computer yet more time to finish handling *other* background tasks before actually doing anything.

        And when the entire updating process is completed, do at least one *extra* reboot. Otherwise, you risk running into weird glitches from certain “autostart” services and tasks not loading.”

        Check the box “Automatically reboot if needed” to eliminate the manual reboots that Windows Updates requires.

        WSUS OU will reboot and login automatically, as needed, to complete the updates.

      2. Peterc said on February 15, 2020 at 9:11 pm
        Reply

        @OldNavyGuy:

        I didn’t want to make my post too long and detailed, but I’m aware of the “Automatic reboot and recall” option in WOU’s installer GUI. I stopped using it at least six/nine months ago because it *routinely* led to the kind of glitches I wrote about. True, these always seemed to get fully resolved by doing a couple of “extra” reboots, but I’m cautious (possibly overly so) about letting background tasks complete at the time they’re “supposed to.” On the other hand, I always updated once a month, so I rarely had more than two manual reboots to attend to, and frequently only one (plus the “extra,” in any event). If I had a three-year backlog of updates that might potentially require *numerous* manual reboots, like @nab, I might be *tempted* to use the “Automatic reboot and recall” feature” again … but I probably still wouldn’t!

        Additional Background: My Windows 7 computer is a ten-year-old middle-of-the-road laptop with mechanical hard drives and is not exactly a speed demon. “Autostart” items failing to load after updating might not be an issue (or as much of an issue) on a fast, powerful computer. The issue could conceivably be due, at least in part, to my antivirus analyzing new system files after each update install in order to whitelist them, and not permitting some tasks to run until it had finished doing so. That would *certainly* take much less time on a fast/powerful computer.

      3. nab said on February 15, 2020 at 1:31 pm
        Reply

        Thanks a lot for that very detailed answer ! That was very informative.

  19. wkeller said on February 15, 2020 at 2:16 am
    Reply

    If you have original Windows 7 ISO DVD, I recommend You to use my fully automated and open source script:
    https://forums.mydigitallife.net/threads/integrate7-script-%E2%80%93-automatically-download-and-slipstream-all-updates-up-to-01-2020.78722/page-15#post-1578165

    So you will have updated Windows 7 with no telemetry!

    1. OldNavyGuy said on February 15, 2020 at 7:51 am
      Reply

      You can also use NTLite to create a slipstream Windows 7 disk, and not have to create an account on MyDigitalLife to get a script.

      1. wkeller said on February 15, 2020 at 11:03 pm
        Reply

        NTLite is closed source. I don’t like the software that I don’t know what it does.

        Anyway, I recommend:
        1. Get (from somewhere) original Windows 7 ISO DVD.

        2. Use open source Integrate7 script, which automatically downloads (directly from Microsoft) all updates and integrates them to the above DVD.
        https://forums.mydigitallife.net/threads/integrate7-script-%E2%80%93-automatically-download-and-slipstream-all-updates-up-to-01-2020.78722/

        3. Use Rufus to create bootable stick.

        4. Install the Windows 7.

        5. Use BypassESU on live Windows 7 OS
        https://forums.mydigitallife.net/threads/bypass-windows-7-extended-security-updates-eligibility.80606/

        6. Install the February 2020 Rollup Update on live Windows 7 OS
        https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4537820/windows-7-update-kb4537820

        7. You are fully updated with zero telemetry!

      2. Martin P. said on February 16, 2020 at 11:18 pm
        Reply

        @wkeller

        Beautifully done! Many thanks for your script and instructions.

    2. bawldiggle said on February 15, 2020 at 12:58 pm
      Reply

      @wkeller
      Thank you, :)

  20. anon said on February 15, 2020 at 2:20 pm
    Reply

    Hi
    I was able to use the bypass last month (following instructions on that MyDigitalLife page before it went private), but from step 2 alone I’m getting “the update is not applicable to your computer” error…

    1. anon said on February 15, 2020 at 3:37 pm
      Reply

      forgot to add my details: Windows 7 Home Basic 64-bit

    2. anon said on February 16, 2020 at 12:39 am
      Reply

      To clarify, I was actually able to use the bypass (followed MDL’s instructions) for last month’s ESU updates, but since it’s time for ESU updates and after reading the articles regarding KB4538483 and happened by this article, I followed the instructions by am currently stuck with step 2…

      After re-installing the bypass, do I need to re-install KB4528069 again, or do I proceed to the 4 updates (KB4538483 etc.)?
      (note: the MDL site said that leaving the bypass installed makes WU run slow, so they suggested to remove the bypass after the initial KB4528069 installment and re-install it on the next ESU updates)

    3. Wolf Rüdiger von Falkenstein said on February 16, 2020 at 12:46 am
      Reply

      I also tried to do it with MyDigitalLife, did not work well.
      Now, with this file and instructions it worked, I am happy !

      1. anon said on February 17, 2020 at 3:48 am
        Reply

        how did you do it?

        this was what I did
        1. downloaded BypassESU-v4.7 (replaced v3) – check
        2. installed the bypass via the bat file – check
        3. tried downloading KB4528069 – stuck
        4. tried downloading the 4 updates (KB4538483, KB4537820, KB4537767, KB4537813) – still stuck

        where am I doing wrong???

        note: my last installed updates were KB4539601 & KB890830

  21. Ficho said on February 15, 2020 at 3:21 pm
    Reply

    I used Deskmodder instructions on Windows 7 Ultimate x64.
    Everything went fine.
    Additional reboot happened during KB4537820 installation.

    1. Ficho said on February 16, 2020 at 12:34 pm
      Reply

      I had to disable Windows Updates because today I was offered a bunch of old updates (6) like:
      KB3185319
      KB2676562
      KB3123479
      etc.
      …and they are keep coming.

    2. Ficho said on February 16, 2020 at 3:52 pm
      Reply

      It looks like Deskmodder instructions are incomplete.
      KB4538483 is also needed, otherwise you’ll be offered a bunch of old updates in WU.
      Maybe I am wrong. We’ll see.

  22. EP said on February 17, 2020 at 8:58 am
    Reply
  23. Wolf Rüdiger von Falkenstein said on February 19, 2020 at 11:44 pm
    Reply

    After installing the new updates, it seems that if you are looking after new windows updates, a lot of old updates are coming again. What to do? Igonore the new “old” updates (e.g. from 2014, 2016) or install them.
    I installed them on one of my T500 Lenovo Notebooks and it seems that the wifi connection don’t work any more with one of my T500, but working fine without that “old” updates. Strange….

  24. Wolf Rüdiger von Falkenstein said on February 20, 2020 at 3:40 pm
    Reply

    I tried again, installed all updates without “KB4537767”. The KB4537767-update (Internet Explorer update) let break down my wifi. Without that update (I use firefox since years) everything works well. One of my 2 T500 machines has that particular problem with the wifi card after installing KB4537767. Just to mention here.

    1. Ficho said on February 20, 2020 at 8:40 pm
      Reply

      You don’t need KB4537767 if you installed KB4537820.

  25. Pipo said on February 23, 2020 at 6:05 pm
    Reply

    I’ve tried this on Windows 7 “Home Premium” as well. Works great!
    I did receive all the updates for february.

  26. BillandMelinda said on February 24, 2020 at 11:58 am
    Reply

    ** BypassESU v5 AIO ** is now available on the MDL forum.
    https://forums.mydigitallife.net/threads/bypass-windows-7-extended-security-updates-eligibility.80606/

    Only MDL members can access the thread.

    1. anon said on February 25, 2020 at 9:49 am
      Reply

      Regarding BypassESU v5 AIO

      even after following the instructions (specifically the prerequisite updates) I’m still unable to install KB4537820

      also, does anyone here know any one from MDL?
      please tell them I have a BIG issue regarding KB4539602

      background: so far I haven’t experienced the supposed desktop problem (KB4534314), but whenever I install KB4539602 (and a week ago its probable elder sibling KB4539601) these are the problems I always encounter:
      1. Avast always has trouble starting up (despite being in the Startup folder)
      2. Audio Service cannot be found
      3. a “Please wait” status during the loading screen, then after Desktop is loaded a “Failed to connect to a windows service” notification saying that “Windows could not connect to the System Event Notification Service service” pops up
      4. my Desktop always reverts to Windows Classic theme, and at Control Panel’s “Appearance and Personalization” the “Personalization” option doesn’t exist; as if Windows Aero got wiped out

      any sort of help is greatly appreciated

  27. Wolf Rüdiger von Falkenstein said on February 24, 2020 at 6:25 pm
    Reply

    Few days ago, I have written, that I think that “KB4537767” breaks down my WIFI connection. Now, after testing more, I am pretty sure, that already : KB4538483 OR KB4537820 breaks down my WIFI conncetion. Saying there is no way to activate the wireless card anymore.
    Conclusion: For me everything is fine working on my T500 Notebook with plugged-in LAN cable, but if I want to use my Notebook with WIFI connction, there is no way any more.
    After installing my backup (before installing Bypass etc.) again, the WIFI connection on my Notebooks is working fine again, but – of course – without Win7 updates > Feb/2020.

  28. Anonymous said on March 10, 2020 at 9:39 pm
    Reply

    Hey! I tried to install the March 2020 monthly rollup for Windows 7 and it won’t work anymore. Anyone having the same problem? Any workaround?

  29. Hugh said on March 11, 2020 at 12:26 am
    Reply

    This hack is not working for me anymore. I tried to install the monthly rollup for March 2020 and it doesn’t install it.

    Any workaround?

    1. Martin P. said on March 11, 2020 at 9:27 pm
      Reply

      @Anonymous & @Hugh

      A new version of the bypass (V5) is available at:

      (must be subscribed to forum)

      https://forums.mydigitallife.net/threads/bypass-windows-7-extended-security-updates-eligibility.80606/

      Direct patch V5 download:

      https://gitlab.com/stdout12/adns/uploads/520dcb7467a84cb12b26b0038715ece1/BypassESU-v5-AIO.7z

      March updates will work with that.

      HTH.

  30. Tron said on March 11, 2020 at 10:17 am
    Reply

    I have installed march 2020 updates on win 7 home 32 bit with this patch!

    (Had already win7 February updates..)

    March update did install only after first installing KB4537829 .

    1. Alkor said on March 12, 2020 at 1:40 pm
      Reply

      Thank you Tron, it worked also in my sistem. I have Win7 Pro x64 and march updates didnt install, and after installed KB4537829, the march update worked !!

      Thank you very much Tron :)

  31. Pipo said on March 14, 2020 at 2:46 am
    Reply

    Working great again for the march updates. Thanks!

  32. Frank said on March 14, 2020 at 11:36 pm
    Reply

    I did a clean install of Windows 7 Pro SP1 64-bit and then got it completely up-to-date to its January 2020 EOL.

    I then ran BypassESU v5 and selected option #1.

    I then installed the IE11 and SMQR updates for February 2020.

    I then installed the SSU update for February 2020.

    I then installed the IE11 and SMGR updates for March 2020.

    Everything went fine.

    The SSU update for March 2020 has been saved for now until the IE11 and SMQR updates for April 2020 are released.

  33. Jorge said on March 20, 2020 at 9:11 pm
    Reply

    Hello

    You must update your article

    Please Help the community * not working for * Windows 7 ESU March Updates * * tried everything * any bypass updates?????

    Thanks

    Mr Jorge

  34. Frank said on March 21, 2020 at 5:29 pm
    Reply

    Assuming your Windows 7 is completely up-to-date to January 2020(including servicing stack update KB4536952):
    If you make use of the GitHub download link that “Martin P.” provided so you can obtain the v5 bypass tool.
    If you make use of the steps that I provided.
    You should be able to install the listed February and March updates.

    Note:
    Make sure to stop the “Windows Update” service from running before doing each step.
    Make sure to restart the computer after completing each step.

  35. Frank said on March 21, 2020 at 8:15 pm
    Reply

    Jorge:
    There are several people who have posted here.
    Which one of them are you directing your complaint towards?
    Frank

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