Which Firefox extensions would you like to see promoted by Mozilla? - gHacks Tech News

Which Firefox extensions would you like to see promoted by Mozilla?

Mozilla announced the Recommended Extensions program for Firefox on April 9, 2019 designed to promote excellent extensions for Firefox in various ways.

Extensions need to meet the "highest standards of security, utility, and user experience", be in active development, safe, offer exceptional user experience, and be really good at what they do.

The program goes beyond the featured extensions listing that Mozilla uses currently on the official repository for add-ons.

Recommended extensions will be reviewed by human reviewers before they are accepted in the program, and then each time an update is released. Human reviews reduce risks associated with automatic review systems significantly; it would look really bad if Mozilla would recommend and promote an extension that would do something shady.

Mozilla plans to promote the extensions in several ways, e.g. on the official Add-ons repository and through the contextual extension recommendation feature of the Firefox browser.

Mozilla mentioned that it contacted several developers already but did not mention names or specific add-ons that it considers for the program.

Popularity may play a role in the initial selection phase but it is likely that popularity -- user counts and ratings -- are not the only factors. If an extension is well designed and exceptional, it is probably a candidate even if the user count is low in comparison.

Tip: A good starting point is our best of Firefox add-ons listing.

Mozilla and the extension developer both need to be willing to accept an extension in the Recommended Extensions program.

Which extensions will likely be included?

mozilla recommended extensions program firefox

Mozilla's Firefox Add-ons website list 15095 extensions for Firefox. Which of these will be included in the program?

If you look at the most popular extensions, you will find several likely candidates. Content blockers and security extensions like Adblock Plus, uBlock Origin, or NoScript are likely candidates. Productivity tools, Video DownloadHelper, EasyScreenshot, Enhancer for YouTube or LastPass may also be included.

Some top rated extensions, even though some may have less than ten thousand or even less than a thousand users, may be candidates as well. Extensions such as SingleFile, Panorama Tab Groups, or Vimium-FF are potential candidates.

Closing Words

If you ask me, I'd like to see a good mix of popular extensions and lesser known but highly polished extensions added to the recommendation program. It would not make much sense to just look at user numbers and base the decision solely on that as it would reduce the discovery aspect of the recommendations.

Remember the time when barely a week passed by without a new cool Firefox extension release that added something unique to the browser or sites you visited? Some of that magic would certainly be useful.

Now You: Which extensions would you like to see added to the program and why?

Summary
Which Firefox extensions would you like to see promoted by Mozilla?
Article Name
Which Firefox extensions would you like to see promoted by Mozilla?
Description
Mozilla announced the Recommended Extensions program for Firefox on April 9, 2019 designed to promote excellent extensions for Firefox in various ways.
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Ghacks Technology News
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Comments

  1. Shiva said on April 15, 2019 at 3:52 pm
    Reply

    FlashGot! :-)

    1. ipononymous said on April 15, 2019 at 8:18 pm
      Reply

      Agreed.
      A proper Download manager. I like DownThemAll

      1. Shadow_Death said on April 16, 2019 at 4:39 am
        Reply

        Too bad it’s EOL since the addons changed. :/

      2. Iron Heart said on April 16, 2019 at 7:53 am
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        Still works on Waterfox.

      3. Anonymous said on April 16, 2019 at 10:10 am
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        “Still works on Waterfox.”

        Although not perfectly.

        https://www.reddit.com/r/waterfox/comments/8nvoxc/flashgot_is_not_working_with_waterfox_anymore_any/

        https://forums.informaction.com/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=24126&start=15

        I was so bored of having to reinstall Flashgot all the time that I had to switch to another less capable extension…

      4. Shiva said on April 16, 2019 at 5:05 pm
        Reply

        “to another less capable extension…”
        Witch one?

        I use JDownloader as external download manager and FlashGot is still the best companion. I don’t know any web extension that give me the option to “save with JD” when I click on a link: by the way, “Download with JDownloader” is not the same integration. Moreover FlashGot Media still works well (and sometimes better than others). For the few things I need never had to reinstall it
        If I have to do a list about why Firefox is the second browser now, an add-on like FlashGot is It’s right up there. My comment above was sarcastic, I’m not interested in any “Recommended Extensions program”, but I’m waiting API improvements. I remember a recent post when a user wrote that nearly all old add-on now can be replaced now by a similar web extension: “nearly all” sometimes makes a difference. Another examples: Theme Font Size Changer or Tile Tab.

      5. Anonymous said on April 16, 2019 at 11:03 pm
        Reply

        “Witch one?”

        Video Downloader Prime
        https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/addon/video-downloader-prime/
        for non-Youtube videos and

        YouTube Video and Audio Downloader (WebEx)
        https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/addon/youtube_downloader_webx/
        for Youtube.

      6. Shiva said on April 17, 2019 at 10:59 am
        Reply

        Good extensions, but they do not support external download manager integration. I prefer to continue using FlashGot as long as I can. With the exeption of YouTube, in this case I use ‘Open With’ to quickly send videos to JDownloader or PotPlayer.

  2. user17843 said on April 15, 2019 at 4:26 pm
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    From a user-standpoint it should be a combination of the 100+- most used extensions and the 100+- technically most useful ones, irrespective of popularity.

    The 100 most used extensions because they are already used by basically 90% of extension users, and thus basically the entire user base profits from Mozilla’s monitoring.

    The 100 most technically useful extensions, because those developers deserve the attention and users will come in contact with new features.

    Then Mozillas has around 200 extensions they need to monitor, and can ignore the other 5,000 or so, so that would be doable for a small team of security engineers.

    1. zakius said on April 15, 2019 at 5:02 pm
      Reply

      unfortunately the second group is dead due to WE limitations

  3. pdp11 said on April 15, 2019 at 4:52 pm
    Reply

    SingleFile: It’s very helpful to archive websites. I use it very often!

    1. tom42 said on April 16, 2019 at 4:28 am
      Reply

      So is Save Page WE

      1. Klaas Vaak said on April 16, 2019 at 8:21 am
        Reply

        @tom42: agreed, and I find it better than SingleFile.

      2. Tom Hawack said on April 16, 2019 at 11:40 am
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        There are sites’ pages ‘Save Page WE’ won’t save correctly whilst I’ve encountered none ‘SingleFile’ couldn’t archive. Of course simple pages are easy, the difference between dedicated archive extensions appears when the page is complex in its coding. Try pages of ‘lemonde.fr’ for instance : SingleFile does the job and last time I tried ‘Save page WE’ rendering the archived html was lousy. For archiving a web page into one single html page there is at this time but one extension really valid and it’s called ‘SingleFile’. I’m surprised it is not featured on AMO which proves IMO that the ‘featured’ label is 100% baloney.

      3. Klaas Vaak said on April 16, 2019 at 2:29 pm
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        @Tom Hawack: perhaps so. I have not experienced that sort of problem, though I admit I don’t use the extension that often. What I like about “Save Page WE” is the presentation more metadata about the saved page.

        In fact, I tend to bookmark pages in Zotero because saving web pages as such can end up taking up a lot of space. If I need data from a web page I will cpy and save specific parts, rather than the whole page. Sometimes, though, it is useful to have the whole page.

      4. gazoo said on April 17, 2019 at 7:26 pm
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        @Klaas Vaak:

        I use them both – still in the testing phase but (fyi) one stand-out feature of SingleFile is the ability to save a portion of a page. I can highlight a section of text (and graphics) and it will only save the highlighted portion.

        The right-click menu option simply says “Save Selection” but it’s identifiable as SingleFile via the icon.

        I used to use both MHT (out of habit, better support among various browsers) and MAFF. Today, if I had to choose one, it would probably be MAFF since it was essentially a zip file holding the resources.

    2. SlipTwixt said on April 16, 2019 at 3:56 pm
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      Came here to write the same thing! Best Plugin for Firefox period. I never saw it mentioned anywhere else before this post.

  4. Anonymous said on April 15, 2019 at 4:54 pm
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    I see you’re still recommending Ghostery on your ghacks.net best addons page. From their english privacy policy :

    “Offers, also known as Ghostery Rewards, is turned on by default and allows companies to show relevant marketing offers to users based upon an algorithm we created that anonymously determines intent and therefore particular commercial offers that may be of interest to you. ”

    “we automatically collect non-private URLs, search queries along with search engine results pages, suspicious URLs that could potentially be phishing websites, information related to safe and unsafe trackers, and information related to the prevalence and performance of Trackers.”

    https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/ghostery/privacy/

  5. Anonymous said on April 15, 2019 at 5:18 pm
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    “LastPass”, “uBlock Origin” and “Vimium” are essentials for me in any browser I use regularly.

    Apart from other extensions mentioned above I always add “Zoom Page WE”, “smartUp Gestures” (adding both dragging and mouse gestures) and “Checker Plus For GMail” to any browser for which they are available.

    I also like an option to suspend tabs, and Discard@Dook is my preference in Firefox…I like it better than other tab suspenders, including The Great Suspender which I use in Vivaldi.

  6. DComedian said on April 15, 2019 at 5:21 pm
    Reply

    LastPass, uBlock Origin and Vimium are essentials for me in any browser I use regularly.

    I always add Zoom Page WE, smartUp Gestures (adding both dragging and mouse gestures) and Checker Plus For GMail to any browser for which they are available.

    I also like an option to suspend tabs, and Discard@Dook is my preference in Firefox…I like it better than other tab suspenders, including The Great Suspender which I use in Vivaldi.

  7. crambie said on April 15, 2019 at 5:54 pm
    Reply

    These days it has to be ad/privacy ones at the top of the recommendations. So for me ublock origin, decentraleyes and privacy possum and something like cookie autodelete and quick js switcher. Anything else other than a password manager of your choice are just nice to have but those are must haves.

  8. ralph said on April 15, 2019 at 5:59 pm
    Reply
  9. Tom Hawack said on April 15, 2019 at 6:41 pm
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    Featured, promoted or whatever label doesn’t interest me at all. I rely only on the extension’s description, the developer (other extensions, homepage) and of course on users’ comments, when comment there is and when the comment is documented, be it good or bad. The ratings, especially those with no associated comment, are IMO insignificant, I even believe the rating concept is basically stupid, an incentive for empty brains to consider a rating star as the expression of their empty brains (logical by the way).

    So: an extension’s description, its developer and users’ feedback are the only points I consider. Remaining “product of the week/year” and of the sort remind me too much of the ads business to give these flags a whatever merit.

    I’d wish that human reviews be a general practice for all extensions proposed on an extensions’ store. If we have to consider an extension as eminent on that ground we’re likely to bring a ‘promoted’ label as the guarantee of a good extension. Just have Mozilla guarantee that extensions on AMO are clean and let the users exercise their interest independently of labels and number of users of that extension, the latter an absurdity of modern times when we all know that masses don’t express truth.

    1. Klaas Vaak said on April 16, 2019 at 8:30 am
      Reply

      @Tom Hawack: why is the rating concept “an incentive for empty brains to consider a rating star as the expression of their empty brains”?

      If someone is happy or unhappy with an extension and expresses that sentiment with 1-5 stars, what is “stupid” about that? To me, rejecting others’ opinions, even if those opinions are from non-tech users, is rather narrow-minded.

      And if you look at it, a good extension will overwhelmingly receive a high number of stars, with the odd low star rating representing a numbskull or someone who did something wrong and is probably too lazy to do something about it. The opposite applies to a bad extension.

      1. Tom Hawack said on April 16, 2019 at 9:56 am
        Reply

        @Klaas Vaak,

        > why is the rating concept “an incentive for empty brains to consider a rating star as the expression of their empty brains”?

        > To me, rejecting others’ opinions, even if those opinions are from non-tech users, is rather narrow-minded.

        My point is to emphasize on the value of opinions, which is why I pointed out the importance I attach to users’ feedback. But an opinion expressed with only a scoring is not an opinion. Whatever the user’s skills, he/she has to explain the reasons of the rating, otherwise it’s meaningless, IMO of course. “I like it, a bit, a lot, not at all” is an emotion, not a description. Why do I like it, a bit, a lot, not at all is the invitation to a constructive comment, dialog and only then authorizes a scoring meant to express the comment, as I see it of course. It’s too easy just to score without explaining why and again, IMO, an incentive to call upon users’ emotions rather than reasoning. This said, we also notice once in a while extension developers who give no, or quasi no description of their add-on. So it’s less a matter of technical skills than of respect for others.

      2. Klaas Vaak said on April 16, 2019 at 2:17 pm
        Reply

        @Tom Hawack: you are contradicting yourself a bit. You state rating is for empty brains, but you go on to state that a rating with a explanation is useful. In other words, rating per se is NOT stupid or for empty brains, but it is reduced to a meaningless exercise when not accompanied by an explanation.

        Another point is emotions. Being a rational person myself (most of the time) I prefer a rationally argued case too. But it is alo possible to give a purely emotional feeling that can be of value. For example, most people will agree, me included, that a BMW is a high quality car, but there are those, me included, who just don’t like them. Is my opinion less valuable than yours with a well argued explanation? Ça se discute.

      3. Tom Hawack said on April 16, 2019 at 4:09 pm
        Reply

        @Klaas Vaak, I never wrote that rating is for empty brains but that “the rating concept is basically stupid, an incentive for empty brains to consider a rating star as the expression of their empty brains (logical by the way).”, in other words that it is stupid in its incentive to allow empty brains to use it in place of a comment. It’s not the same thing, which is why I developed my argument in my second comment. I neither said as well that rating was useful. I implicitly stated that rating’s only pertinence was when it sort of summarized a documented comment, and I nuanced this for the sake of intellectual honesty because frankly, between you and I, I remain convinced ratings, with or without comments, remain a basic stupidity which bring nothing to readers.

        I don’t believe, as you write it, that “it is also possible a purely emotional feeling that can be of value”. Not that its not possible : it’s feasible and not forbidden! but that an extension is not a piece of art, you don’t install it for the pleasure of your soul but to use it, emotion is irrelevant here. Sensitivity and sentimentality are two different things and the latter is concerned when a user rates with no rational reason, at least expressed. But this is the big stuff nowadays : “vote, even if you don’t know why, just let your heart speak”. Your heart or your guts because if you list ratings free of comments they are mainly 1, 2 start ratings. If one must say why he dislikes and rates 1 start accordingly same applies to why he likes : in the former case there may be irelevant hatred, in the latter fake ratings (friends of the developer who were in a hurry). I repeat that, IMHO, ratings are stupid and that what is beneficial for all, the speaker as well as the audience is less an approximate rating than words, words, sentences, the meaning. Simple, no?

      4. Klaas Vaak said on April 16, 2019 at 5:54 pm
        Reply

        @Tom Hawack: “I never wrote that rating is for empty brains but that “the rating concept is basically stupid, an incentive for empty brains….”
        If the rating concept is stupid, then, logically, the rating that flows from it is stupid and for empty brains too. In fact, you even confirm it, stating: “I repeat that, IMHO, ratings are stupid …”
        So, you are trying to prove that I misread/misunderstood your words, and yet you confirm my reading of them. Duh …

        No, an extension is not a piece of art, although some people may not agree on that, but neither is a BMW. Yet, both an extension and a BMW generate emotions, feelings, which are subjective by definition. Yes, a rating with an explanation is a lot more valuable than one without, there is no doubt about it. Those without you can ignore, those with you can take on board in your considerations. In my modest opinion, if an extension has a lot of likes, even if there are many unexplained ones, there is a good possibility that there is something good about the extension, or in any case it warrants further investigation rather than outright rejection. Simple, no?

      5. Tom Hawack said on April 16, 2019 at 4:21 pm
        Reply

        @Klaas,

        > “For example, most people will agree, me included, that a BMW is a high quality car, but there are those, me included, who just don’t like them. Is my opinion less valuable than yours with a well argued explanation? Ça se discute”

        That’s a reason to emphasize on commenting rather than on rating : what do you rate, the quality of a BMW or your personal interest for the car? How is a reader to know what your rating applies to? But if you write, i.e. “BMW is high quality but personally I don’t like it”, if, better even if you say why you dislike it and end your comment by stating, i.e. “5 for the quality, 1 for my interest, hence an average 3 stars” … then everyone understans your position, ex-pli-cit-ly!

    2. Shiva said on April 16, 2019 at 12:14 pm
      Reply

      It might be interesting to see statistical distribution of empty comments and number of stars.

    3. owl said on April 17, 2019 at 11:38 am
      Reply

      >Tom Hawack said on April 15, 2019 at 6:41 pm

      I agree with your values.
      Values and preferences are diverse. Of course, use of PC purpose, even how to use the Browser is the variety.

      I am not interested in digital contents such as SNS (Facebook, Twitter), GAME, You Tube.
      With internet connection, the most important thing is privacy protection (fingerprinting measures). Its management must be controllable by the end user.
      For this reason, I need the ability to control the connection with the vendor (For-profit companies such as Google and Facebook etc) that I want to ignore.

      The Internet connection uses “Nord VPN”, and the connection management uses “simplewall” and “WPD”.
      Browser’s favorites are Tor Browser, Firefox Developer Edition, Brave Dev and Pale Moon. Of course, config is also customized (fingerprinting measures).

      In short,
      My choice is not “one and only”, but rather a “favorite” as a result of personal preference.

      Based on them,
      Firefox-extensions that I have implemented at the moment are as follows.
      However, no extensions have been added to Tor Browser.

      Auto Tab Discard:Use native tab discard method to automatically reduce memory usage of inactive tabs
      http://add0n.com/tab-discard.html

      Buster: Captcha Solver for Humans:Save time by asking Buster to solve captchas for you.
      https://github.com/dessant/buster

      Chameleon:Spoof your browser profile. Includes a few privacy enhancing options.
      https://github.com/sereneblue/chameleon

      ClearURLs
      Remove tracking elements form URLs.
      https://gitlab.com/KevinRoebert/ClearUrls

      CopyTabTitleUrl
      Copy the tab title and URL to the clipboard.
      https://www.bugbugnow.net/

      CSS Exfil Protection
      Guard against CSS data exfiltration attacks.
      https://www.mike-gualtieri.com/css-exfil-vulnerability-tester

      Dark Background and Light Text
      Makes every page to have light text on dark background (exact colors are customizable)
      https://github.com/m-khvoinitsky/dark-background-light-text-extension

      Decentraleyes
      Protects you against tracking through “free”, centralized, content delivery.
      https://decentraleyes.org/

      Feedbro
      Advanced Feed Reader – Read news & blogs or any RSS/Atom/RDF source.
      https://nodetics.com/feedbro

      Forecastfox (fix version)
      Get international weather forecasts with this highly customizable extension
      http://www.s3blog.org/forecastfox.html

      Google Analytics Opt-out Add-on (by Google)
      Tells the Google Analytics JavaScript not to send information to Google Analytics.

      hide-scrollbars
      Hides page scrollbars!
      https://github.com/quinton-ashley/firefox-hide-scrollbars/blob/master/README.md

      HTTPS Everywhere
      Encrypt the Web! Automatically use HTTPS security on many sites.
      https://www.eff.org/https-everywhere

      Nano Defender
      An anti-adblock defuser for Nano Adblocker and uBlock Origin
      https://jspenguin2017.github.io/uBlockProtector/

      Neat URL
      Remove garbage from URLs.
      http://hugsmile.eu

      Netcraft Extension
      Comprehensive site information and phishing protection when browsing the web
      https://toolbar.netcraft.com/

      Privacy Possum
      Privacy Possum monkey wrenches common commercial tracking methods by reducing and falsifying the data gathered by tracking companies.
      https://github.com/cowlicks/privacypossum

      S3.Translator
      Translation of selected text, introduced by a phrase or a fully web-site from any language to any language
      http://www.s3blog.org/s3translator.html

      SingleFile
      Save a complete page into a single HTML file
      https://github.com/gildas-lormeau/SingleFile

      Skip Redirect
      Skip intermediary pages that some pages use before redirecting to a final page.
      https://github.com/sblask/webextension-skip-redirect

      Speed Dial
      Easy access to your favorite websites via an stylish speed dial!
      http://mybrowseraddon.com/speed-dial.html

      Startpage.com — Private Search Engine
      Take back your online privacy by using Startpage.com as your search engine. Startpage.com offers high-quality search results without any trackers or ads that follow you. This privacy add-on changes your current search engine to Startpage.com.
      https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/startpage-privacy-search-engin/

      Temporary Containers
      Open tabs, websites, and links in automatically managed disposable containers. Containers isolate the data websites store (cookies, cache, and more) from each other, further enhancing your privacy while you browse.
      https://github.com/stoically/temporary-containers

      TitleURL
      Add the current URL to the windows title bar
      https://github.com/cloutierjo/titleUrl

      Trace – Online Tracking Protection
      Browse online without leaving a Trace, because who wants to be tracked?
      https://absolutedouble.co.uk/trace/

      Tree Style Tab
      Show tabs like a tree.
      https://piro.sakura.ne.jp/xul/_treestyletab.html.en

      uBlock Origin
      Finally, an efficient blocker. Easy on CPU and memory.
      https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock#ublock-origin

      uMatrix
      Point & click to forbid/allow any class of requests made by your browser. Use it to block scripts, iframes, ads, facebook, etc.
      https://github.com/gorhill/uMatrix

      VTZilla
      VirusTotal Firefox Extension.
      https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/vtzilla/

  10. Firefox User said on April 15, 2019 at 7:35 pm
    Reply

    Dissenter meets all the criteria.

      1. Anonymous said on April 16, 2019 at 11:59 am
        Reply

        Yep. Gave up on Firefox and went to Brave. Things got on a downward spiral the moment they fired Brendan Eich. Now they try to mimic Google in everything they do without people complaining too much about cloning their Chrome browser.

        What is hate speech anyway? It’s just a concept used to illustrate speech some people don’t like and is in opposition to the freedom of speech, an ideal which Mozilla has now in name only. They and hypocrites and no longer fight for an open internet.

  11. JSB said on April 15, 2019 at 7:45 pm
    Reply

    The ones that finally convince you to abandon Firefox and switch to Palemoon.

  12. 12bytes said on April 15, 2019 at 9:22 pm
    Reply
    1. Anonymous said on April 15, 2019 at 10:02 pm
      Reply

      Thanks.
      I think that CanvasBlocker now includes a window.opener protection that makes the Don’t touch my tabs! extension redundant now.

    2. Darren said on April 17, 2019 at 9:28 am
      Reply

      Grabbed ClearURLs. Thanks for the suggestions.

      1. 12bytes said on April 17, 2019 at 2:47 pm
        Reply

        yeah, ClearURLs is a really good link cleaner IMO – i have yet to see anything break while using it – at first it bothered me that there’s no whitelist functionality in it, but it seems it just isn’t necessary – i like stuff that works well enough that i can install it and forget about it

  13. Stan said on April 15, 2019 at 10:19 pm
    Reply

    Is that a browser or a lunatic asylum ?

    https://forum.palemoon.org/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=21794

    1. Iron Heart said on April 16, 2019 at 7:52 am
      Reply

      The latter, clearly. They like their forum to be toxic, the link you posted is proof.

    2. Pants said on April 16, 2019 at 9:02 am
      Reply

      As one commentator there called it … “Tobexit” .. maybe they’ll extend his “leaving the union” until October 31st

      1. Tom Hawack said on April 16, 2019 at 12:03 pm
        Reply

        @Pants wrote “[…]“maybe they’ll extend his “leaving the union” until October 31st”

        Halloween’s “trick or treat”. But what deserves a trick, remaining or leaving?!
        I’d love to have the UK returning to the union. That’s the UK, only. Turns out UK will leave and UK only. Should be the other way around.

  14. Croatoan said on April 15, 2019 at 10:20 pm
    Reply

    Imagus – original size images on preview,
    uBlock Origin – block ads,
    LastPass – password manager

  15. asd said on April 15, 2019 at 10:22 pm
    Reply

    Swift Selection Search
    Temporary Containers
    Don’t Track Me Google

    (I would have nominated X-Notifier, but after Web Extension killed it and removed most of the old functionality I stopped using it)

  16. ULBoom said on April 15, 2019 at 11:47 pm
    Reply

    I look in categories or for something mentioned here or elsewhere. I’m willing to look at promoted extensions if they have some special merit and don’t pop up unexpectedly interrupting browsing. Oherwise the term “promoted” is a turn off; I’ve tried recommended extensions and have never found any I keep for long.

  17. DragoCubed said on April 16, 2019 at 12:21 am
    Reply

    You know what I actually want Mozilla to do with extensions? Make them more capable. Firefox 60 ruined EditThisCookie. Evidence: https://www.ghacks.net/2018/02/26/mozilla-removes-individual-cookie-management-in-firefox-60/

  18. Robert Ab said on April 16, 2019 at 12:31 am
    Reply

    uBlock Origin, Session Manager

  19. clake said on April 16, 2019 at 1:39 am
    Reply

    My vote is for ublock origin because of its efficiency and versatility – and it is the only extension installed ;-)

  20. PJ said on April 16, 2019 at 4:36 am
    Reply

    Dissenter:
    https://dissenter.com

    Surely Mozilla is big on free speech support. Oh wait, they removed it the same day (and probably hour) Google did.

  21. tom42 said on April 16, 2019 at 4:39 am
    Reply
  22. Dave said on April 16, 2019 at 6:57 am
    Reply

    An advertisment, by any other name, is just as offensive!

  23. Allwynd said on April 16, 2019 at 8:05 am
    Reply

    uBlock Origin, Privacy Badger and Popup Blocker Strict should be the three that show up on the home page from now until the end of time. In fact they should come pre-installed with the browser.

  24. Radical Dreamer said on April 16, 2019 at 9:54 am
    Reply

    DownThemAll was awesome :(

  25. Torin Doyle said on April 16, 2019 at 1:11 pm
    Reply

    au-revoir-utm
    HTTPS Everywhere
    NoScript
    Single File

  26. Antonio said on April 16, 2019 at 2:23 pm
    Reply

    Some of mines:
    * Dark Reader
    * Breadcrumbs (Locationbar2 is dead thanks to WE)
    * New Tab Besides
    * Qlearly
    * Tab Center Redux
    * Tab Counter Icon
    * Tampermonkey
    * Temporary Containers
    * Zoom Page WE

  27. Addemibuga said on April 16, 2019 at 3:41 pm
    Reply

    A great pick would be Dissenter. Or did Mozilla remove it already?

    1. DragoCubed said on April 17, 2019 at 6:00 am
      Reply

      Mozilla removed Dissenter :(

    2. DragoCubed said on April 17, 2019 at 6:02 am
      Reply

      I don’t know anything about Dissenter but hate speech isn’t okay.

      1. Addemibuga said on April 17, 2019 at 2:03 pm
        Reply

        What does Dissenter have to do with hate speech?

        Beside that, either you support or oppose free speech, there is no in-between.

      2. Torin Doyle said on April 17, 2019 at 6:12 pm
        Reply

        +1

      3. Anonymous said on April 18, 2019 at 11:37 am
        Reply

        Dissenter is a commenting addon launched by the far-right extremist social network Gab:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gab_(social_network)

        “On February 24, 2019,[29] Gab launched a browser extension and website called Dissenter, which allows users of Gab to make comments”
        “Gab is an English-language social media website that is known for its mainly far-right user base.[8] The site has been described as “extremist friendly”[9] or a “safe haven”[10] for neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and the alt-right.[9]”
        “It has stated that conservative, libertarian, nationalist and populist internet users were its target markets.”

        The funny thing about them pretending to support free speech is that, ideologically, the far right is the first supporter of

        * arbitrary censorship of anyone by private companies (for example they are against net neutrality because it would prevent private ISP from censoring whatever they want), that’s their “libertarian” face
        * censorship of anything left-wing by everyone, of course, that’s their fascist face

      4. owl said on April 18, 2019 at 12:03 pm
        Reply

        +1 vote

      5. Gerald Brennan said on April 21, 2019 at 1:05 pm
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        YOU’RE not OK, DragoCubed. The First Amendment exists to protect speech that is offensive. When you grant an authority to ban “hate speech” they will unfailingly use it to censor any views that interfere with their power and agenda.

        And the bravely-named Anonymous is just as deluded. Censorship is wrong, found most common in main street media and on college campuses, and it is ALL from the left.

  28. Stan said on April 16, 2019 at 4:17 pm
    Reply

    The Chrome Store.

    Do I recall ??? way back, that Mozilla claimed Quantum would be compatible with Chrome Extensions….???

    1. DragoCubed said on April 17, 2019 at 6:00 am
      Reply

      Stan. Quantum is “compatible” with Chrome extensions. You pretty much have to replace “Chrome” with “Browser” (in the code). Pre-Quantum Firefox could use the Chrome Web Store, Chrome extensions, WebExtensions AND more because it had a very capable add-on system. Of course that wasn’t possible by default and I doubt they would allow Chrome Web Store support by default.

  29. Stan said on April 17, 2019 at 4:50 pm
    Reply

    ^Thanks :)

  30. archie said on April 17, 2019 at 9:28 pm
    Reply

    Youtube classic. Google behaves as the Microsoft of the late 90’s. This extension minimizes the damage on youtube, somewhat

  31. thatoneguy said on April 19, 2019 at 1:25 am
    Reply

    firesomething and ipf*ck

    Then blacksheep.

  32. Gerald Brennan said on April 21, 2019 at 12:57 pm
    Reply

    Dissenter, which they have blocked. Mozilla is becoming part of the problem.

  33. Gerald Brennan said on April 21, 2019 at 1:08 pm
    Reply

    It’s still possible to get Dissenter for Firefox but you’ll have to download it manually from the Dissenter.com download page.
    And to hell with the totalitarian respondents who seek to stifle speech.

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