Google Sign-In page gets new, unified design

Google plans to roll out a new unified design for its sign-in page soon that will have the same look and feel on all devices you use.

Google changed the sign-in page several times throughout the years. The last change of the sign-in page dates back to 2015 which Google announced in pretty much the same way.

Google changed the design of the page back then, and switched from a single sign-on page to a two-page sign in form. The company has asked for the username on the first page, and for the password on the second page ever since.

google new sign in

Google notes that the new design won't change the functionality of the sign in page at all. The steps remain the same to sign in to a Google account, and users will enter the same information to do so.

The company mentions three benefits of the new page.

  • Have a cleaner, simpler look.
  • Make the sign-in process faster.
  • Be consistent across computers, phones, and tablets.

Here is a screenshot of the new sign-in page:

google new sign-in page

 

Google wants to provide anyone, regardless of device that is used to access the page, to see the same sign-in page. The new page will look the same regardless of whether you are using a PC or Mac, an iPhone or iPad, or an Android device.

There are exceptions however. The company notes that users may continue to see the old sign-in page if they use an older version of a browser, or have JavaScript turned off. Google does not define "older version of a browser" on the page. It is unclear whether this means that you will have to run the latest version of Chrome or Firefox for instance, or if older refers to certain technologies that are required to render the new sign-in page correctly.

Google users on Android or iOS may have noticed the new sign-in page already on their devices. Android users when they add a new account to their device through Settings > Accounts, iOS users when they use the Google application on the system.

Tip: Make sure you have set up 2-factor authentication for your Google Account as it improves the security of the account significantly.

The new sign-in page will certainly surprise some users. One reason why Google is making the announcement early is to reduce the impact on the bulk of users.

Now You: what is your take on the change?

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Google Sign-In page gets new, unified design
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Google plans to roll out a new unified design for its sign-in page soon that will have the same look and feel on all devices you use.
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Responses to Google Sign-In page gets new, unified design

  1. Chris April 1, 2017 at 12:30 pm #

    Friends don't let friends use Google. ;)

    I never understood why Google switched to that forced 2-page design just for people to sign in. People hated it and raised hell on Google's own forums. But Google chose to force the new design on users, despite the protests and outrage.

    Now, instead of doing what their customers want, Google continues to force their customers to go through two separate pages just to login. Well, "customers" is the wrong word to describe Google users. "Merchandise" is much more accurate.

    Google does what Google wants. And if you use their services, YOU are the merchandise. And as merchandise, your voice really doesn't matter.

    • Rick A. April 1, 2017 at 1:33 pm #

      i've never understood why they do that. And to make it worse, Yahoo does that with their e-mail and Microsoft does that with outlook . com.

      Does anybody know why? is their a benefit to doing that ?

    • Anonymous April 1, 2017 at 1:56 pm #

      "RAWR I don't understand why they did something so it must be bad! RAWR!"

      • IowaMan April 1, 2017 at 4:03 pm #

        ^^^ haha - made my morning

      • Derpy April 1, 2017 at 8:32 pm #

        "Lol I like change for changes sake as I'm a 3rd rate graphic designer and need a job."

    • kainr2 April 1, 2017 at 5:50 pm #

      One word, third party IDP. Okay, that is actually three words.

  2. beemeup4 April 2, 2017 at 3:38 am #

    Two page login acts as a security measure against phishing sites that make fake Google login pages that look like the real one. With a real Google login, your display name is shown on the 2nd page where you enter your password, whereas a fake site would not know your display name.

    The Bank of America login page used to have something similar where they had you choose a custom image and image name, which they would display before you enter your password, with the logic that a fake BofA login page would not have this data. Sadly BofA removed this security function and offered no replacement to help users defend against potential fake sites aside from opting to use the SafePass 2FA.

    • Ben April 2, 2017 at 3:24 pm #

      > Two page login acts as a security measure against phishing sites that
      Bullshit. The phising site can just retrieve the display name via javascript like your browser would and that's it.
      It's absolutely no additional security there, just more user annoyance.

      • beemeup4 April 2, 2017 at 9:18 pm #

        So you're saying the phishing site could just copy what a user enters as a login name and paste it into a real Google login to get the display name, then copy that display name back to the phishing site, all using javascript? Not only would that introduce a noticeable delay in the login process it would also undoubtedly alert Google to the presence of suspicious activity which is something a scammer would want to avoid.

      • Ben April 2, 2017 at 9:52 pm #

        > So you're saying the phishing site could just copy what a user enters as a login name and paste it into a real Google login to get the display name, then copy that display name back to the phishing site, all using javascript?

        Correct.
        First of all the delay is negligible. Nobody will realize that. Google cannot detect it anyway, because JS runs on your local machine, there are not like thousands of requests from some foreign website.
        You make the fake login, load the real one non-displayed along, copy paste what the user put in the fake form, send the real form, read the display name after it's loaded, display it, get the password, done.

      • Saam April 4, 2017 at 4:59 pm #

        "Google cannot detect it anyway, because JS runs on your local machine, there are not like thousands of requests from some foreign website."

        Whether JavaScript is client-side or not makes no difference. The JavaScript would still need to make a HTTP request, which Google will be able to detect and prevent, especially if the origin of the script is not internally sent from another Google script/page or authorised third party app/site.

        beemeup4 is probably right in their saying that it's a security measure against phishing sites, although most people gullible enough to fall for most phishing sites probably won't notice if the personal name associated with their login email is shown or not.

      • hfn April 6, 2017 at 5:23 pm #

        Not only that, if you're educated about phishing, you would just check the address bar and the indicator that
        the site is secure. There should be an option for people who want to turn this on or not, since the reasoning is flimsy, but for the most careless surfers.

  3. George April 2, 2017 at 8:47 pm #

    Google says: "the sign-in process will be faster". Can someone please explain how that is going to happen?

    • jahu April 23, 2017 at 1:14 pm #

      Seems like google removed the option to not save your account name. So that's probably what they mean by faster...

  4. Katherine April 3, 2017 at 5:56 pm #

    I hate the new way.. it's so terrible. To me, it takes up more space!

  5. sak April 4, 2017 at 7:43 am #

    Google not yet released the new sign in page. So cool down and wait. May be it will easier than now.

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