FreeBSD 9.0 Has Been Released - gHacks Tech News

FreeBSD 9.0 Has Been Released

The operating system FreeBSD 9.0 has been released yesterday. The new version introduces several new technologies, feature additions and updates, including USB 3.0 support, the TRIM command for the Fast File System which improves interaction with Solid State Drives (SSDs), an update to Storage Pool Allocator version 28 which adds support for data deduplication and triple parity RAIDZ, and support for the Highly Available Storage (HAST) framework which offers network based Raid 1 functionality for additional data redundancy.

Additional features include updates to Gnome version 2.32.1 and KDE version 4.7.3, support for high performance SSH, an update to the NFS subsystem which now supports NFSv4 in addition to version 3 and 2, and kernel support for Capsicum Capability Mode, "an experimental set of features for sandboxing support".

Support for USB 3.0 and Fast File System TRIM support are without doubt two of the most important feature additions in FreeBSD 9.0. The USB subsystem furthermore supports USB packet filtering now, which can be used to capture packets which go through the USB host controller.

freebsd

FreeBSD 9.0 is the first update of the operating system after the February 2011 FreeBSD 8.2 release, and the first major version update in two years.

Users interested in all of the changes can access the highlights here or detailed change log here. Please note that both release logs are highly technical.

Users who never came into contact with FreeBSD or another BSD variant before should start at the Resources for Newbies that offers help in selecting the right FreeBSD version, installation instructions and tutorials that should get most people started after installation.

FreeBSD 9.0 can be downloaded from the official website. The operating system can be downloaded as an ISO image which needs to be burned to DVD first, before the computer can be booted from it to start the installation of the operating system.

Additional information are available at the official website.

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Comments

  1. JohnMWhite said on January 14, 2012 at 5:36 am
    Reply

    You know, something I’ve noticed a lot here recently is that you don’t seem to link to the actual software you are discussing (or its official website) until somewhere near the bottom of the article or, as in this case, you don’t actually link at all. Release notes and resources are handy, and I probably shouldn’t be too lazy to type freebsd.org into the address bar, but I am curious what the deal is. It just seems standard procedure everywhere else to link to the site in the first mention of the product you’re trying to highlight, and I’m sure it used to be here too. Was there a concerted effort to change for some reason?

    Editor Note: I have added the link to the main FreeBSD page to the first sentence of the article

    1. Martin Brinkmann said on January 15, 2012 at 9:46 am
      Reply

      I almost exclusively link to the site in the last paragraph. For me, it has something to do with the flow of the article. You read the article and then at the end, you go to the new site to read, download or interact with it.

      1. JohnMWhite said on January 15, 2012 at 5:07 pm
        Reply

        I’ve been coming here since Download Squad shut down and it’s only been in the past few weeks that I’ve noticed you and others doing that. And I guess in this article you just forgot by the time you got to the last paragraph. Thanks for putting the link in the opening now, though you might want to have mentioned that you edited the article, otherwise Chris and I look a bit silly wondering where the link is when it’s the fourth word.

      2. Martin Brinkmann said on January 15, 2012 at 5:24 pm
        Reply

        John,

        when they read the comments they are probably not stopping at the first one, but read all of them. I would not worry to much about it.

      3. JohnMWhite said on January 15, 2012 at 7:06 pm
        Reply

        I’m not hugely worried, my point was just that before I posted that last comment, someone might read all of them and think Chris and I were just oblivious to the link that’s right there on the first line. That’s because you didn’t, and still haven’t, indicated that you made an addition or edit to the original article. Reading your comment wouldn’t have changed anything, so what good would that do? I am obviously aware that people might read more than the first comment, which is why I did mention the comment that is currently at the bottom of the list as well.

        Really, this is getting a bit weird already. I was only offering a suggestion about clarity and you seem to be determined to wriggle out of addressing what is not at all a big deal. Perhaps we just aren’t understanding each other here.

      4. Martin Brinkmann said on January 15, 2012 at 7:24 pm
        Reply

        I have added an editor note to your first comment.

      5. JohnMWhite said on January 15, 2012 at 7:07 pm
        Reply

        Also what’s with my comments always requiring moderating these days? Is that now also standard procedure or am I special or somehow tripping over keywords?

      6. Martin Brinkmann said on January 15, 2012 at 7:16 pm
        Reply

        The WordPress plugin Akismet is handling that, I cannot really tell you why yours are always moved to moderation while others are not. I’m checking multiple times a day.

    2. JohnMWhite said on January 16, 2012 at 5:34 am
      Reply

      Thanks for that. Just seems odd that I’m seeing the links left out or hidden somewhere near the bottom quite often lately. Maybe it’s just random synchronicity making me paranoid.

  2. Chris said on January 15, 2012 at 4:33 am
    Reply

    I have noticed this also JohnMWhite.
    However it appears to be in a large number of tech related websites including PCWorld, Gizmodo and Lifehacker. It might be something to do with encouraging one to read the full article first? Not too sure, but I look forward to Martin’s response.

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