How to disable the "Your Windows 7 PC is out of support" full screen popup - gHacks Tech News

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How to disable the "Your Windows 7 PC is out of support" full screen popup

Microsoft plans to inform users of the company's Windows 7 operating system on January 15, 2020 that support for the system ended. The company wants to display a full screen popup on Windows 7 PCs from January 15, 2020 onward.

Note: Support for Microsoft Security Essentials ends on January 14, 2020 as well.

Microsoft integrated a new version of the End of Service notifier executable in the December  2019 Monthly Rollup for Windows 7.  EOSnotify.exe, which is located under ,%windir%\system32\,  is used to display the full screen popup on Windows 7 devices when support ends.

The executable file is run via the scheduled tasks EOSNotify and EOSNotify2 which administrators find under Microsoft > Winodws > Setup in the operating system's Task Scheduler. The first task launches the full screen message when a user logs into the operating system, the second daily at 12 PM.

your windows 7 pc is out of support

It displays the following message:

Your Windows 7 PC is out of support.

As of January 14, 2020, support for Windows 7 has come to an end. Your PC is more vulnerable to viruses and malware due to:

  • No security updates
  • No software updates
  • No tech support

Microsoft strongly recommends using Windows 10 on a new PC for the latest security features and protection against malicious software.

Microsoft's suggestion is puzzling as it recommends getting a new PC and running Windows 10 on that PC. No word about the current PC and upgrading that PC to Windows 10.

The popup has three links that users may activate:

  • Learn More
  • Remind me Later
  • Don't remind me again

Users may select "don't remind me again" to block future popups on the system. It is furthermore possible to modify the Windows Registry to disable the message as well.

Disable the Windows 7 end of support popup

  1. Use Windows-R to open the Run box. Type regedit to start the Registry Editor.
  2. If an UAC prompt is displayed, confirm it.
  3. Navigate to the following path: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\EOSNotify
  4. If the Dword value DiscontinueEOS is listed under EOSNotify, double-click it and set its value to 1.
  5. If it is not yet, create the value (right-click on EOSNotify, select New >Dword  (32-bit) Value).

Selecting "don't remind me again" will set the DiscontinueEOS value to 1.

Closing Words

It is likely that many users will continue to run Windows 7 even after support end. Some may upgrade to Windows 10 (which is still free if a genuine key is available), others may switch to Linux.

Microsoft will support Enterprises and small businesses who sign up for Extended Security Updates until January 2023 with security updates. A method was discovered recently to install these patches on Home devices running Windows 7 but it is too early to tell whether it will remain an option after support ends officially. Third-party 0Patch plans to release some patches for Windows 7 for free as well.

Now You: do you run Windows 7 devices? What will you do after January 14, 2020? (via Bleeping Computer)

Summary
How to disable the "Your Windows 7 PC is out of support" full screen popup
Article Name
How to disable the "Your Windows 7 PC is out of support" full screen popup
Description
Microsoft plans to inform users of the company's Windows 7 operating system on January 15, 2020 that support for the system ended.
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Ghacks Technology News
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Comments

  1. Jimmy said on December 12, 2019 at 10:32 am
    Reply

    Wouldn’t disabling the scheduled tasks also work?

    1. Martin Brinkmann said on December 12, 2019 at 2:48 pm
      Reply

      Yes, probably if that is allowed.

  2. Karim Abdul Asim Achmed Kumarli said on December 12, 2019 at 10:54 am
    Reply

    “popop”

    Sadly this word is not present in the English vocabulary. (Unless you dabble in chemistry.)

    Try again, Martin.

    1. VioletMoon said on December 12, 2019 at 4:51 pm
      Reply

      I think he meant “popo” as in the police [NSA] compromised the site and is eavesdropping on comments.

      “Users may select “don’t remind me again” to block future popups on the system. It is furthermore possible to modify the Windows Registry to disable the message as well.”

      I guess I don’t get the idea here; the simplest solution is always the best, so why not click “Don’t remind me again” and be done with it?

    2. John Siman said on December 12, 2019 at 5:23 pm
      Reply

      Why not you can just go teach english to someone if you considered yourself so smart? Your comment in not only revelant but stuoid. Mistakes happen. No please F33K off.

    3. ULBoom said on December 12, 2019 at 6:24 pm
      Reply

      poop

      don’t remind me again.

  3. Tom Hawack said on December 12, 2019 at 11:17 am
    Reply

    I was wondering how to translate “Ils nous auront fait chier jusqu’au bout, ceux-là”

    DeepL Translator : “They’ll have pissed us off to the end, those guys.”
    Google Translate : “They will have pissed us off to the end, those”

    Whatever, guess you get the idea.

  4. Bobo said on December 12, 2019 at 12:02 pm
    Reply

    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

    [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\EOSNotify]
    “DiscontinueEOS”=dword:00000001

  5. Yuliya said on December 12, 2019 at 12:09 pm
    Reply

    >support for Windows 7 has come to an end
    uhm, no it did not, you’re literally keeping 7601 alive for as long as Windows 10 home users have support, i.e 2025

    >vulnerable to viruses and malware
    yeah, they made sure to include both buzzwords so anyone gets their message

    >no security updates
    except for the monthly security updates, i.e nothing changes

    >no software support
    any developer out there willingly to shoot themselves into their own legs?

    >no tech support
    this is a joke, this one cannot be serious, no..

    >Microsoft strongly recommends using Windows 10
    ofcourse

    >on a new PC
    I’ll throw my workstation with a 6950x in it, and replace it with that meme Surface X or whatever they call it, in no time!!11 lmao

    Yeah, but no. Just use Simplix Update Pack on 7/2008R2.
    http://forum.oszone.net/thread-257198.html
    No telemetry, no GWX, no M$ b/s.

    1. Yuliya said on December 12, 2019 at 2:08 pm
      Reply

      “popup” in title, not “popop” :)

      1. Anonymous said on December 12, 2019 at 3:18 pm
        Reply

        Grow up will ya !
        Read and learn rather than picking on spelling errors.

      2. Yuliya said on December 12, 2019 at 3:31 pm
        Reply

        wow o.O somebody woke up on the wrong side of the bed

  6. Malte said on December 12, 2019 at 12:25 pm
    Reply

    Well Microsoft, guess what operating system doesn’t have MY support? ;)

  7. John said on December 12, 2019 at 12:42 pm
    Reply

    What happens if one reinstalls Windows 7 after January 14, 2020? Will the Windows Update server install all of the old updates up to January 2020? Or, will no updates, even old ones be available?

    1. Anonymous said on December 12, 2019 at 9:32 pm
      Reply

      It should continue to serve old updates I believe, they just won’t make any new ones available unless you pay them or get them another way.

  8. John C. said on December 12, 2019 at 1:14 pm
    Reply

    The day before yesterday, with nagging suspicion I installed that update on my Windows 7 computer. Along with that, I installed a couple more updates. When I rebooted like they said, my computer locked upon “Configuring updates, don’t turn off your computer”. After 20 minutes of that nonsense, I pressed the power button and killed the computer. Cursing profoundly and with deep hatred for Microsoft, I turned the computer back on and started Windows normally. Turns out that everything was okay and all the updates installed correctly somehow. Also turns out that I was correct about not trusting the updates because despite already having disable this warning which, IIRC, MS already attempted to fool me into putting on my computer, they have snuck it in again.

    I plan to air-gap my Windows 7 computer and set up another computer running some Linux distro for accessing the internet. I will not give up my legacy applications, buy into forced Windows updates or allow hidden telemetry via hardened IP addresses at a sub-kernal level, all of which a move to Windows 10 would mandate.

    Thanks for the article, Martin. Well done.

    1. ULBoom said on December 16, 2019 at 9:32 pm
      Reply

      Used to happen to me regularly, wait forever, hold power button, restart and all is well.

      Disabled updates eventually, download when desired from Catalog now.

      Letting MS do things automatically is a crap shoot.

  9. Martin P. said on December 12, 2019 at 2:08 pm
    Reply

    « How to disable the “Your Windows 7 PC is out of support” full screen popop »

    Shouldn’t it be « popup » instead of « popop »?

    1. Martin Brinkmann said on December 12, 2019 at 2:48 pm
      Reply

      Yes, thanks!

      1. Curtis Howell said on December 12, 2019 at 5:15 pm
        Reply

        Hello mac screw Microsoft

    2. Declan said on December 12, 2019 at 3:19 pm
      Reply

      picky, picky, picky

    3. Lina Freeman said on December 12, 2019 at 5:24 pm
      Reply

      Wow, you guys are literally grammer ****!

    4. J said on December 12, 2019 at 9:33 pm
      Reply

      Yeah what a grammer star star star star, he casually pointed out a mistake he saw and wasn’t rude about it or anything, real scum of the earth

  10. Kurt said on December 12, 2019 at 2:26 pm
    Reply

    All giants have and will find an end; the dinos have and Mircrosoft (you know who i mean) may get there

    Maybe the message should have read :
    “Your Windows 7 PC is out of support” full screen poopup”.
    Finally MS should have had the idea to let users have the option to convert to a Linux with a W10 Screen.

    Written on a W10 PC.

  11. Dave said on December 12, 2019 at 3:27 pm
    Reply

    “Now You: do you run Windows 7 devices? What will you do after January 14, 2020? (via Bleeping Computer)”

    I’ll configure the router to allow only local traffic on the one laptop that can’t be upgraded past windows 7. No loss, it’s only use these days is as a portable video player.

  12. b said on December 12, 2019 at 6:22 pm
    Reply

    “Microsoft’s suggestion is puzzling as it recommends getting a new PC and running Windows 10 on that PC. No word about the current PC and upgrading that PC to Windows 10.”

    Not puzzling:

    “For most Windows 7 users, moving to a new device with Windows 10 will be the recommended path forward. Today’s PCs are faster, lightweight yet powerful, and more secure, with an average price that’s considerably less than that of the average PC eight years ago.”
    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4057281/windows-7-support-will-end-on-january-14-2020

    1. John Fenderson said on December 13, 2019 at 11:38 pm
      Reply

      @b:

      Indeed. Microsoft not only sees nothing wrong in trying to strong-arm people into using an OS they don’t want to use, but also nothing wrong in telling those same people that they need to replace their perfectly good computer in order to do so.

      It really speaks volumes about Microsoft’s attitude towards people.

  13. ULBoom said on December 12, 2019 at 6:34 pm
    Reply

    Probably a bit startling the first time that thing blows up in your face.

    I moved from 7 seven years ago to 8, which sucked for a year until 8.1 came out, which was OK except for the checker board interface which still sucks on 10.

  14. John said on December 12, 2019 at 7:01 pm
    Reply

    I can understand why people would not want this pop-up (I see it’s value for all the folks who are not aware that Windows 7 is no longer being supported soon, but obviously everyone who has read this article *is* aware and thus does not need a pop-up to tell them).

    However, wouldn’t it be easier to just click “Don’t remind me again” than to start messing around with the registry to avoid a single one-time pop-up that can be dismissed in a second without any such measures?

  15. David Satz said on December 12, 2019 at 7:40 pm
    Reply

    My laptop came with Windows 8, which I immediately upgraded to Windows 7.

    If Microsoft had offered an in-place update to Windows 10, I would have installed it already. I suspect that the same is true for many other Windows 7 users. If Microsoft is unhappy with the number of people still using Windows 7, they can look in the mirror for the cause.

    As things stand, I’m in no hurry to buy a new laptop and get it completely set up with all the applications and settings that I need, so I will take my chances until I feel ready for that.

    1. David Satz said on December 13, 2019 at 8:17 pm
      Reply

      … and _the day after I posted the above message_, my laptop started to display continual warnings that it was overheating and needed service.

      Since that service is likely to cost at least half as much as a new laptop, and since I definitely need a working laptop for a project this coming week, I acceded to the inevitable and bought a refurbished Windows 10 machine. Another one bites the dust!

  16. Jess Louis said on December 12, 2019 at 10:21 pm
    Reply

    Thank you for this article, hope to read it again before Jan 15 or exit WinOs for TrueOS.

  17. Mothy said on December 12, 2019 at 11:04 pm
    Reply

    Still have one system running Win 7 but at this point I’ve decided to stop installing any further updates. I just don’t want this kind of crap on the system even though it appears to be easy to disable. But more importantly because I don’t trust Microsoft to not screw up the system some how especially the last patch cycle in January!

  18. zaphod said on December 13, 2019 at 3:56 pm
    Reply

    Already migrated my family to lubuntu. Life is good. Goodbye Microsoft, and I didn’t even need to become an Apple (owned in large part by Bill Gates/Microsoft ) fanboi.

  19. John said on December 14, 2019 at 5:42 am
    Reply

    My three Win7 machines haven’t talked to MicroGarbage for two years now. They work just fine. I will continue to us commercial protection software. I don’t let my Win8.1 or Win10 machine talk to M$ either. The Win10 machine still runs fine on the first OS it came with. I’ve been using Windows since MSDos 1.1 and I’m too old to change to Linux (or too lazy). As long as the intelligent software developers keep creating those great utilties that shut off M$ telemetry attempts we’ll be fine.
    My thanks to all of you who contribute to this site. It is a very enjoyable read.

  20. Peter Newton said on January 14, 2020 at 1:06 am
    Reply

    Hi all

    The following comment is a little off topic, but is related to the end of life for Win 7, this article seemed to be the most appropriate and recent place to post this.

    Yes its me again, Microshit’s worst nightmare lol, well the end of Winblows 7 is only days away now, and I see countless Youtube videos popping up, about what it should be replaced with ?

    On one particular YT channel [which shall remain nameless], the presenter seems to be suffering from a satanic obsession with Chrome Books as a suitable replacement, to give you an idea of what this sounds like, repeat the following in a voice as closely approximating a parrot as you can.

    “bawk” …… “Chromebooks” .. “Chromebooks” .. “Chromebooks” .. “Chromebooks” .. “bawk” .. “$200” …… “bawk”………………

    By now you cannot fail to have noticed, that this kind of content gets very tedious, very quickly ! and if you are a fan of tech reviews, you may have come across an item of news, which was covered by “Switched to Linux”, in which he reported that Google, the maker of Chrome Books, had accidentally issued a remote code instruction, to disable the Chrome Books owned by 10,000 users. The intention of this remote switch, is to inform the user that their current model needs to be replaced due to security and vulnerability issues, in essence, Google remotely switches off your CB, which is their way of telling you to buy a new one. The cycle of obsolescence is set to five or six years, and to my mind this is outrageous !

    So in conclusion, Chrome Books, in my opinion, are not a viable replacement for Win 7, and I wish someone would inform our nameless presenter on Youtube of the facts, and stop this incessant parroting of the same tired statements we’ve heard him make since the beginning of time.

    For those whom already have a Chrome Book, this may be bad news, but, as they say, every cloud has a silver lining, with a little research and some ingenuity, a Chrome Book can be used to install and run Linux :) so all is not lost, come that fateful day, when your CB suddenly dies, for no apparent reason.

    Thank you for reading, my best wishes to all,

    Peter Newton [London UK]

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