Block Microsoft Edge from running in the background on Windows 10 - gHacks Tech News

Block Microsoft Edge from running in the background on Windows 10

If you run a device that is powered by Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system, you may have noticed Microsoft Edge processes in the Task Manager or another program even if you don't run the program.

These processes, MicrosoftEdge.exe, MicrosoftEdgeCP.exe, and MicrosoftEdgeSH.exe, show up as suspended in the task manager.

The processes use no CPU or memory in suspended state; some users may prefer to block Microsoft Edge from running in the background even in suspended state. If you never use Edge, there is virtually no reason why it should launch in the background.

Note that the process works fine on recent versions of Windows 10. It may not work with the not-yet-released Chromium-based version of Microsoft Edge; we will see.

The process requires editing of the Windows Registry and a Settings change. Note that you can still run Microsoft Edge on the device.

Here we go:

Settings app

microsoft edge background

The very first thing you want to do is prevent Edge from running in the background:

  1. Use the shortcut Windows-I to open the Settings application on the Windows 10 device.
  2. Go to Privacy > Background Apps.
  3. Toggle Microsoft Edge on the page so that its status reads off.

Windows Registry

microsoft edge background stop

You need elevated privileges to edit the Registry. I recommend that you create a backup of the Windows Registry before you make the changes.

You can download Registry files from Majorgeeks to make the changes without editing the Registry manually. It is usually better if you make the changes manually to better understand what is being changed.

  1. Tap on the Windows-key, type regedit, and hit the Enter-key on the keyboard to launch the Registry Editor.
  2. Confirm the UAC prompt that is displayed.
  3. Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\MicrosoftEdge\Main
    • If Main does not exist, right-click on MicrosoftEdge and select New > Key, and name it Main.
    • Tip: if you make a mistake naming something, right-click on it and select rename to change the name.
  4. Right-click on Main and select New > Dword (32-bit) Value.
  5. Name it SyncFavoritesBetweenIEAndMicrosoftEdge
  6. Double-click on it and set its value to 1.
  7. Right-click on Main and select New > Dword (32-bit) Value.
  8. Name it PreventLiveTileDataCollection.
  9. Double-click on it and set its value to 1.
  10. Right-click on Main and select New > Dword (32-bit) Value.
  11. Name it AllowPrelaunch.
  12. Make sure the value is set to 0 (it is the default).
  13. Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\MicrosoftEdge\TabPreloader
    1. If TabPreloader does not exist, right-click on MicrosoftEdge and select New > Key, and name it TabPreloader.
  14. Right-click on TabPreloader and select New > Dword (32-bit) Value.
  15. Name it PreventTabPreloading.
  16. Double-click on the new value and set it to 1.
  17. Right-click on TabPreloader and select New > Dword (32-bit) Value.
  18. Name it AllowTabPreloading.
  19. Make sure its value is set to 0.
  20. Restart the computer.

Closing Words

The Microsoft Edge processes should be gone after the restart. You can undo the change by deleting the mentioned keys and values in the Registry, and allowing Edge to run in the background.

Now You: Which is your preferred browser right now?

Summary
Block Microsoft Edge from running in the background on Windows 10
Article Name
Block Microsoft Edge from running in the background on Windows 10
Description
Find out how to prevent the Microsoft Edge web browser from running in the background on Windows 10 devices.
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Ghacks Technology News
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Comments

  1. Jojo said on February 11, 2019 at 9:31 am
    Reply

    Excellent.

    Now how do I identify and get rid of the 75 “Host Process for windows Services” tasks I see?

    75 freaking tasks with the same exact name! Thanks Microsoft.

    1. Martin Brinkmann said on February 11, 2019 at 9:34 am
      Reply

      You can click on the little arrow next to Service Host: under Processes in the Task Manager to see which service or services are linked to the process.

      1. ADW said on February 11, 2019 at 11:42 am
        Reply

        Example: Service host: Group policy client
        Click on arrow, now you get:
        Service host: Group policy client > Group policy client

        Redundant and retarded task manager view.

        This is on v1803.

      2. Jojo said on February 11, 2019 at 8:32 pm
        Reply

        My bad. I was using an old task manager substitue.

        Under Win10 Task Manager, I see that these tasks are ID’d as “Service Host: name”, which at least helps identify them.

        There should be an option to exclude Microsoft processes from the display since there isn’t much that a user can do about most Microsoft processes. Seeing them is only useful when there is some sort of problem.

    2. 420 said on February 11, 2019 at 12:43 pm
      Reply

      use ltsb, I have mine cut down to 39 processes.

    3. Tom Hawack said on February 11, 2019 at 2:30 pm
      Reply

      There’s the excellent Black Viper’s Service Configurations pages, those I’ve used for Windows XP then for Windows 7, which includes all Windows versions.

      For Windows 10 : Black Viper’s Windows 10 Service Configurations
      http://www.blackviper.com/service-configurations/black-vipers-windows-10-service-configurations/

      1. Jojo said on February 11, 2019 at 8:26 pm
        Reply

        Last time I messed with Black Viper, I wound up hosing my system and had to restore it from image backup.

    4. dark said on February 11, 2019 at 3:36 pm
      Reply

      You are better off demoting Windows inside a VirtualBox or Gnome Boxes on Linux for whatever windows software’s you need to use.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1c5wiQhgZU

      For windows games, you can use Lutris or Steam + Proton.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4U93SBuK68

  2. user123 said on February 11, 2019 at 10:02 am
    Reply

    Doesn’t exist a setting for that as GPO? I guess I found something in the past

  3. Pedro said on February 11, 2019 at 10:38 am
    Reply

    Uh, I don’t have the MicrosoftEdge key in the registry.

  4. Weilan said on February 11, 2019 at 10:44 am
    Reply

    That’s the part I hate the most about Shitdows 10 – you’re so out of control and even if you change a certain setting, you still aren’t sure if that will work or not. Like these tools about disabling telemetry – when I had Shitdows 10, I would disable the telemetry, turn off the PC, turn it on the next day and open the telemetry program just out of curiosity and see that some items have enabled themselves again on their own…

    That’s why I stick to Windows 7 until the bitter end. At least you have control over your OS and it’s not flat and ugly like some early Alpha build.

  5. Anonymous said on February 11, 2019 at 12:44 pm
    Reply

    yeah gotta remember to check that setting page whenever windows updates. mine has gamebar enabled for some reason even though I had turned off everything but windows defender before. shady as always.

  6. Joe said on February 11, 2019 at 12:59 pm
    Reply

    In the third paragraph, “the not-yet-released Chromium-based version of Windows 10” should read “the not-yet-released Chromium-based version of Edge”.

    I’m embarrassed to say I was actually really confused and somewhat astounded for a second, as I read it as a Chromebook-based version of Windows 10.

  7. AnorKnee Merce said on February 11, 2019 at 1:16 pm
    Reply

    Why do Windows users have to suffer such nonsense from M$.? Why can’t Edge be removed/uninstalled from Win 10.?.

    It is not fair-trade for a non-free OS like M$-Windows to integrate her browser(= IE and Edge) or Search engine(= Bing) or Digital Assistant(= Cortana) or One Drive or Skype or Store into the OS. Such stand-alone apps/programs can be preinstalled by M$ but they should also be removable/uninstallable from the OS. M$ has been abusing her market-monopoly power.

    OTOH, it is fair-trade for a free OS like Google-Android or ChromeOS to integrate her stand-alone apps/programs into the OS = the business model of offering free OS to users in exchange for the ability to derive ad revenue or other revenue stream = similar to free-to-air TV companies like ABC, CBS, NBC and FOX.

    In effect, M$ has been double-dipping or triple-dipping = super-greedy..

    1. Tom Hawack said on February 11, 2019 at 2:44 pm
      Reply

      > Why do Windows users have to suffer such nonsense from M$.?

      Because Microsoft has become a dirty company.

      Never say never, which is why I don’t say that I’ll never switch to Windows 10, mainly because maybe naively I still wonder if Win10 will emerge from hell to be one day acceptable. But I discover but flaws, one after another. I’m losing hope, Linux is becoming more and more tomorrow’s OS alternative. For the time being I just cannot imagine moving to Window 10.

      1. John Fenderson said on February 11, 2019 at 5:04 pm
        Reply

        @Tom Hawack: “Because Microsoft has become a dirty company.”

        True. They became a dirty company in the late ’80s.

      2. Anonymous said on February 12, 2019 at 3:19 am
        Reply

        They started as a dirty company, ripping off IBM (look up the story of OS/2 and little Billy Gates and his gang of crooks) and have been criminals ever since. You can legally call them criminals because they have been convicted several times now of corporate crime.

  8. clake said on February 11, 2019 at 2:23 pm
    Reply

    With win10 pro, use gpedit to look at edge tweeks.
    Local Computer Policy > Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Microsoft Edge

  9. chesscanoe said on February 11, 2019 at 2:27 pm
    Reply

    Using Windows Home x64 [Version 10.0.17763.292], I use Chrome beta x64 and rarely IE11. I never need to use Edge.

    1. seeprime said on February 11, 2019 at 4:11 pm
      Reply

      chesscanoe: That’s not the point. Windows is still starting Edge whether you use it or not. Martin explains hot to stop that from happening.

  10. Dave said on February 11, 2019 at 4:08 pm
    Reply

    Would this make Edge slower to open?

    What affect would this have on windows search?

    (I mean the search box on the start bar using a local account with cortana disabled through it’s own settings. I like the little flyout)

  11. Jeff said on February 11, 2019 at 4:13 pm
    Reply

    Uhm don’t use any edition of 10 except LTSB/LTSC. KMS activation is easy.

  12. Tom said on February 11, 2019 at 5:51 pm
    Reply

    “Switch to our browser, it starts up faster. That’s because we run it in the background whether you’re using it or not!”

    This is a disturbing trend, and I hope not every software company starts adopting it. Otherwise my 32GB of memory will start going pretty fast.

  13. Anonee said on February 11, 2019 at 10:08 pm
    Reply

    Thank god it was already disabled for me, but good tip anyway!
    I went ahead and turned off some other background apps that I never use.

  14. Netmammal said on February 12, 2019 at 7:48 pm
    Reply

    Uhhh wait a minute, why do I have to set SyncFavoritesBetweenIEAndMicrosoftEdge to 1 get Edge to stop running? That sounds like we are going in the wrong direction. Don’t we want Edge to be doing less?

    BTW, other than running Linux (and I “should” but don’t, I don’t have the time, I spend enough time trying to get Tech working that has teams of people testing it) you are back to using an abucus. Every time I wander in to look at the processes in OS X and figure out what it is that is the latest thing trying to sending bits over the internet through the Little Snitch firewall, I get more depressed.

  15. Rick said on February 12, 2019 at 9:18 pm
    Reply

    It’s unclear if you mean the Registry (policy) change to be an alternative method or something meant to be used in addition to the UI toggle, but I only did the UI toggle (for Edge), rebooted, and no longer see the usual two Edge processes in memory, so the Registry/policy change seems unnecessary and may in fact just be an alternative method.

  16. John L. Galt said on February 12, 2019 at 11:13 pm
    Reply

    Windows 10 x64 Pro Insider Preview build 18334 does not have a MicrosoftEdge Key under HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\ at all.

  17. Adam S said on February 13, 2019 at 5:49 am
    Reply

    I’ve also tried to follow the above steps, but like John L. Galt, I don’t have a ‘MicrosoftEdge’ key under ‘HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies\Microsoft’ either.

    I’m on build 1809.

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