Try this if Google Chrome closes automatically on start - gHacks Tech News

Try this if Google Chrome closes automatically on start

I run multiple web browsers on my system and even different versions of the same browser. When it comes to Google Chrome, I run Chrome Stable, Canary and Chromium on my system to make sure I don't miss any major change in any of those.

Recently, when I tried to start Google Chrome Canary on the system, I noticed that the browser would close automatically after a second or two. Any attempt to get the browser to start normally did not work at the time.

I restarted the PC and tried to run the browser again but it would just quit. I tried to run it with elevated privileges and compatibility mode settings, but that did not work out as well.

While this could have been an issue introduced in a recent Chrome or Windows update, I decided to run the Windows troubleshooter to see what it had to say -- if anything -- about the issue.

chrome is incompatible

I ran the troubleshooter and, surprise, it could not fix the issue. The Program Compatibility Troubleshooter assessed Chrome and concluded that the program was incompatible.

Note: this message has nothing to do with Chrome's own incompatible applications warning.

I was able to run Chrome Canary the other day on the same system, however, and no update happened since that time.

With Windows' troubleshooter being no help at all, I decided to try a couple of troubleshooting options. First thing I did was disable hardware acceleration as it caused quite a few issues in the past; turned out, it was not hardware acceleration that time.

Next, I decided to run Chrome with a parameter that would disable all extensions. Chrome started normally and would not quit automatically again.

I found the cause for the issue but not the extension responsible. One issue with the outlined option is that you don't get access to the extensions interface in Chrome when you run it with the parameter.

Anyway, here is how you can run Chrome without any extension to fix the issue if you experience it as well:

  1. Right-click on Chrome in the taskbar.
  2. Right-click on Chrome again in the menu, and select Properties.
  3. Switch to the Shortcut tab of the properties window.
  4. Add --disable-extensions to the end of the Target field and make sure that there is a space between the last character of the path and the parameter, e.g.  "C:\Users\Martin\AppData\Local\Google\Chrome SxS\Application\chrome.exe" --disable-extensions
  5. Click ok to save the change.

Start Google Chrome afterward and you will notice that all extensions are disabled. You could then reset Google Chrome, or continue to troubleshoot the issue, e.g, by testing extensions one by one to find out which is responsible for the issue that you experience.

Now You: Did you ever run into issues with Chrome quitting on start?

Summary
Try this if Google Chrome closes automatically on start
Article Name
Try this if Google Chrome closes automatically on start
Description
Recently, when I tried to start Google Chrome Canary on the system, I noticed that the browser would close automatically after a second or two.
Author
Publisher
Ghacks Technology News
Logo
Advertisement

We need your help

Advertising revenue is falling fast across the Internet, and independently-run sites like Ghacks are hit hardest by it. The advertising model in its current form is coming to an end, and we have to find other ways to continue operating this site.

We are committed to keeping our content free and independent, which means no paywalls, no sponsored posts, no annoying ad formats or subscription fees.

If you like our content, and would like to help, please consider making a contribution:


Previous Post: «
Next Post: »

Comments

  1. chesscanoe said on November 19, 2018 at 12:13 pm
    Reply

    I have never had the Chrome problem you describe using its x64 beta version under Windows 10. However when I want to disable all extensions to troubleshoot some other problem not causing Chrome to shut down, I simply open a new Incognito window.

  2. Sebas said on November 19, 2018 at 2:00 pm
    Reply

    No I did not, although ‘Use hardware acceleration when available’ does slow down the browser at startup.

    Now that you mention it, it happens every now and then with Brave beta Version 0.57.6.

  3. Richard Allen said on November 20, 2018 at 7:05 am
    Reply

    I’ve never had a problem with Chrome Stable crashing when started. Chrome Dev is a different story, the last time it was crashing at startup was just this summer. Fact is my experience with Chrome Dev is that it very often has bugs and those bugs can often be attributed to a flag being enabled, but then that same flag in Chrome Stable will be working just fine. This year, graphics related flags like zero copy rasterizer and out of process rasterization have been recurring problems for me on Win7 using a Nvidia graphics card. From what I’ve seen, on my hardware, disabling the GPU seems to me to be a more common solution than disabling extensions.

    Even though the performance is generally very good I can’t imagine using Chrome Dev or even Chromium that is always being updated to the latest version as my ‘primary’ browser. With Chrome Dev I’ve seldom bothered using command line switches to disable extensions or hardware acceleration. I’m not going to use a browser without at least uBO working. And disabling hardware acceleration for a browser is not something I want to do, that’s just incentive for me to use a different browser. At least with any of the dev browsers an update will fix the problem usually within a day or two. I imagine anyone using the dev build of a browser would have more than one browser installed, right? ;)

    If a flag is suspected to be causing a problem and you can’t open your chromium browser you can delete the “Local State” file in the “User Data” folder which will reset all of the flags. You can for example enter: %localappdata%\Google\Chrome Dev\User Data into the Windows Explorer address bar to get to that folder. You can also just use %localappdata% to open the AppData\Local folder and find whatever is needed inside there.

    Speaking of command line switches, I rarely ever see any mention of how to disable weak cipher suites for chromium browsers. What’s up with that? You can use this link to see what is being used:
    “https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/viewMyClient.html”

    I put together a command line switch quite some time ago to disable those ciphers:
    –cipher-suite-blacklist=0x009C,0x009d,0x002f,0x0035,0x000a
    I haven’t experienced any broken websites and none of my browser installs are using those ciphers. The command line switch also works in Vivaldi.

    1. Richard Allen said on November 20, 2018 at 7:14 am
      Reply

      Looks like the double dash in front of command line switches, when posted in the comments, is still being converted into a single En Dash. :(

Leave a Reply

Check the box to consent to your data being stored in line with the guidelines set out in our privacy policy

Please note that your comment may not appear immediately after you post it.