Windows 11 Requirements Check Tool offers details on why a PC is not compatible with Windows 11

Windows 11 Requirements Check Tool is a new portable program for computer systems running Windows 8.1 or Windows 10. It compares the computers hardware with Microsoft's requirements for the company's Windows 11 operating system.

It offers a quick option to check if a PC is compatible with Windows 11. If that is all that is required, it is as good a tool as any for the job as it displays whether the device is compatible with Windows at the top of the window when it is run.

What sets it apart from other tools of its kind, including Microsoft's own PC Health Check tool and third-party solutions such as Win11SysCheck or WhyNotWin11, is that it reveals information about incompatibilities that the other programs don't provide.

Most tools check the model and make of the processor to find out if it is on Microsoft's compatibility lists for AMD, Intel and ARM processors.

Windows 11 Requirements Check Tool

Windows 11 Requirements Check Tool does not do that.  The tool checks the actual processor requirements and returns the result to the user.

windows 11 requirements check tool

The program checks for the following processor features and instructions next to the number of cores and processing speed:

  • PAE (Physical Address Extension)
  • NX (No-eXecute)
  • SSE4.1 (Streaming SIMD Extensions 4.1)
  • CMPXCHG16B
  • LAHF (Load AH from Flags)
  • SAHF (Store AH into Flags)
  • PrefetchW
  • Virtualization-Based Security (VBS)

Similarly, the program checks whether the system has a security processor and supports secure boot. For Secure Boot, it will highlight if the device supports it and whether it is enabled or disabled. For TPM, it will check for a TPM 2.0 security processor.

The application runs two feature checks at the time of writing. The first checks if connected displays support High Dynamic Range (HDR) content. AutoHDR is a new feature that Microsoft introduces in Windows 11 to improve the graphics quality of games.

The second tests if the storage controller of the system disk and the shader model of the graphics card meet DirectStorage requirements. DirectStorage is another new feature aimed at gamers that promises improved game loading times.

A click on an entry opens a help page on the developer's website with additional information about the feature.

Closing Words

Windows 11 Requirements Check Tool may provide Windows users with additional information in regards to Windows 11 compatibility of their systems. It may provide actionable information when a feature is supported but not enabled. For most users, it may be enough to know if a system is compatible or not.

Still, it is a well designed tool that is very promising.

Now You: are your devices compatible with Windows 11? (via Deskmodder)

Summary
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Windows 11 Requirements Check Tool
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Comments

  1. ilev said on September 7, 2021 at 8:13 pm
    Reply

    The Intel i7-6700K isn’t compatible with Windows 11 yet is is mark in green (compatible).

    1. ByteJammer said on September 8, 2021 at 11:04 am
      Reply

      The processor is split into two items:
      Processor – Shows GREEN when it has 2 cores and supports at least 1GHz
      Virtualization-Based Security – Shows in your case RED as your processor lacks the Intel MBEC feature.

  2. Andy said on September 7, 2021 at 8:19 pm
    Reply

    Not very accurate. says my display adapter is directx 11 but the directx diagnostic tool says i have 12?

    1. Jeff M.S. said on September 8, 2021 at 5:17 pm
      Reply

      D3D 11 GPU can have D3D 12 drivers. Does not mean it has D3D12 shaders in the hardware. DxDiag reports device driver interface (DDI) version. Try GPU-Z for more detailed info on whether the hardware supports DX12.

  3. Gex said on September 7, 2021 at 10:02 pm
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    I have a 6700K as well, and the only thing I fail is HVCI/MBEC.
    Reading through the Windows 11 documentation, it’s entirely optional, but enabled by default. So, I think we’re gonna be fine.

    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/design/device-experiences/oem-hvci-enablement#default-enablement

  4. Anonymous said on September 7, 2021 at 10:26 pm
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    Why would anyone rush out to use Windows 11? Its complete downgrade from any of the previous versions of Windows.

  5. Anonymous said on September 7, 2021 at 11:27 pm
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    I bought a non-games machine because I don’t need a games machine so the ‘in addition’ ‘fails’ don’t make any difference (until Microsoft does a specifications change for updating Windows 11 a couple of years after release as they did with my old touch device).

    Incidentally, my incredibly inexpensive old touch device that no longer updates casts movies smoothly. The expensive new Dell does not. Its not a deal breaker but was a disappointment.

  6. chesscanoe said on September 7, 2021 at 11:37 pm
    Reply

    WIN11RTC passed my new current WIN10 laptop but gave an orange bar for AutoHDR, correctly saying Display does not support HDR. Microsoft Store “Display HDRTEST” correctly shows some but not all HDR tests work OK.
    DirectStorage also got an orange bar, saying DiretStorage requires “Standard NVM Express Controller” which I believe is a driver for hardware I do not have.

  7. Dumbledalf said on September 8, 2021 at 2:37 am
    Reply

    Seems like I’m all good:

    https://i.imgur.com/2tDfoOl.png

    xD

  8. Anonymous said on September 8, 2021 at 4:44 am
    Reply

    There is no way anyone is using Windows 11 until they add back everything they removed. Windows 10 will be another XP. Once people install it and notice all the features removed they will upgrade to Windows 10.

    It makes me wonder if the Windows team even uses Windows themselves. Turning the taskbar into a half-as-useful “artistic statement” where you can’t un group icons or have labels will keep many on 10, and I think a lot of businesses are staying on 10 because they have actual work to do.

  9. Anonymous said on September 8, 2021 at 7:48 am
    Reply

    Not like I’m leaving Win10 any time soon but this tool seems pretty inaccurate.

    1. ByteJammer said on September 8, 2021 at 11:01 am
      Reply

      This tool shows a webpage with helpful instructions (or even a video) when you click on a red or orange item. So if for example Secure Boot or TPM shows red you get this webpage that helps you to turn it green: https://bytejams.com/help/tpm.html

      1. ilev said on September 8, 2021 at 6:42 pm
        Reply

        The example report is misleading. In this case even if you enable Intel PTT and Secure Boot the PC will fail due to the 6700K CPU (currently is in green).

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