Virtual Driver Turns Any Directory Into A Drive - gHacks Tech News

Virtual Driver Turns Any Directory Into A Drive

Turning a directory into a drive letter can have several benefits, with the most obvious one being accessibility.

Drives are placed prominently in save and load dialog windows, and while it is possible to add folders to a sidebar or the favorites for a similar effect, accessing a drive letter instead is often the faster choice.

Windows actually comes with the tools to create a virtual drive from any folder on one of the hard drives connected to the computer. We have explained that in detail in assign drive letters to folders. While that is great, it means command line work which some users may not feel comfortable with.

Still, some users may prefer to use a graphical user interface for this operation, and that is what Virtual Driver provides.

virtual driver
virtual driver

The program adds a new context menu entry to the folder right-click menu, allowing users to create a virtual drive out of the selected folder. The directory selected will remain in its position which means it stays accessible as before, but will furthermore become available as a drive letter.

The interface offers settings to select the drive letter, drive label and icon. There is furthermore an option to make the change temporary, which means just for the current session, or permanent.

Permanent folders can be unmapped at any time by right-clicking again, which will display the unmap virtual drive option.

Experienced computer users may prefer to use the command line tool subst instead, as it does not require additional software to be installed. Windows 64-bit users need to rely on subst, as Virtual Driver is only compatible with 32-bit editions of Windows.

The software program is available for download at the developer's website. A similar program is Visual Subst which we have reviewed earlier as well.

Update: The Virtual Driver application is no longer available, the homepage returns a not found error when yout ry to open it. We have removed the link as a consequence and suggest you use Visual Subst instead.





  • We need your help

    Advertising revenue is falling fast across the Internet, and independently-run sites like Ghacks are hit hardest by it. The advertising model in its current form is coming to an end, and we have to find other ways to continue operating this site.

    We are committed to keeping our content free and independent, which means no paywalls, no sponsored posts, no annoying ad formats (video ads) or subscription fees.

    If you like our content, and would like to help, please consider making a contribution:

    Comments

    1. Gulo said on August 12, 2010 at 11:35 pm
      Reply

      C:\Windows\System32>subst /?
      Associates a path with a drive letter.

      SUBST [drive1: [drive2:]path]
      SUBST drive1: /D

      drive1: Specifies a virtual drive to which you want to assign a path.
      [drive2:]path Specifies a physical drive and path you want to assign to
      a virtual drive.
      /D Deletes a substituted (virtual) drive.

      Type SUBST with no parameters to display a list of current virtual drives.

      C:\Windows\System32>

    2. Gulo said on August 12, 2010 at 11:36 pm
      Reply

      I suppose the mention of ‘visual subst’ probably means most are aware of subst already. Delete away if you like.

    3. diggfreeware said on August 14, 2010 at 12:49 pm
      Reply

      The subst command will not take effect when reboot.

      1. Martin said on August 14, 2010 at 1:32 pm
        Reply

        Well you can theoretically write a small batch and add it to autostart

    Leave a Reply