Fedora 32 Linux Distribution is now available - gHacks Tech News

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Fedora 32 Linux Distribution is now available

Fedora 32 has been released on April 28, 2020. The new version of the Linux distribution is already available as a direct download or upgrade.

Fedora Workstation administrators may consult the official upgrading Fedora 31 to 32 guide if they need assistance when upgrading to the new version of the Linux distribution. In short, the following commands need to be run from Terminal:

  1. sudo dnf upgrade --refresh
  2. sudo dnf install dnf-plugin-system-upgrade
  3. sudo dnf system-upgrade download --releasever=32
  4. sudo dnf system-upgrade reboot

Users on Windows and Mac devices may download the Fedora Media Writer application to create installation media using it. ISO files are also provided for users who prefer these.

Fedora 32

fedora 32

Fedora may not be as popular as Ubuntu Linux or Linux Mint, but it has a loyal following. The workstation version of Fedora 32 comes with a number of new features, changes and improvements.

Here is a short overview of important changes in Fedora 32:

  • Desktop environment GNOME 3.36 (default environment) -- featuring a redesigned lock screen, new Extensions application to manage GNOME extensions, Settings redesign, redesigned Notifications and Calendar popover, and redesigned Clocks application.
  • EarlyOOM is enabled by default to better cope with low-memory situations; this reduces heavy swap usage and should recover the system more quickly in low-memory situations (which previously could result in slow-downs or the system becoming unresponsive altogether).
  • firewalld uses nftables as default backend.
  • Weekly file system TRIM is enabled by default. TRIM informs storage devices about unused blocks; this can make wear leveling more efficient among other things.
  • Fedora apt package switched from apt-rpm to regular apt.
  • Python 2 has been removed (because of end of support). A legacy Python 2.7 package is still provided for developers who require it.

Administrators who plan to upgrade to Fedora 32 or install the Linux distribution anew may want to consult the list of known bugs first to make sure no stopper bugs affect the installation or use of the operating system after installation.

Manjaro 20.0 and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS have been released in April 2020 as well.

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Fedora 32 Linux Distribution is now available
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Fedora 32 Linux Distribution is now available
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Fedora 32 has been released on April 28, 2020. The new version of the Linux distribution is already available as a direct download or upgrade.
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Comments

  1. thebrowser said on April 29, 2020 at 12:19 pm
    Reply

    Maybe it’s just a coincidence that many popular distros are being updated around the same time, but I’m really happy reading about it here in Ghacks. Nice and refreshing, looking forward to see similar content.

    1. motang said on April 30, 2020 at 12:00 am
      Reply

      Both Ubuntu and Fedora shoot for spring and fall releases. So they come out almost around the same time every year. :-)

  2. Matti said on April 29, 2020 at 2:22 pm
    Reply

    Fedora user here. Will stick to 31 for a couple more weeks to allow 32’s initial bugs to be squashed, and also for my usual gnome-extensions and rpm-fusion/copr repos to catch up.

  3. Linus Trovalts said on April 29, 2020 at 7:41 pm
    Reply

    Fedora- Hundreds of thousands of real Linux users.
    Ubuntu- Millions of dumb-f**ks (Windows user).

    1. ShintoPlasm said on April 30, 2020 at 8:57 am
      Reply

      @Linus: way to generalise, [Editor: please remain polite].

  4. Peterc said on April 29, 2020 at 10:26 pm
    Reply

    I recently bought a new laptop (a 2020 LG Gram 17), and although I’m running the bundled Windows 10 Home on it for now, I would *really* prefer to use Linux as my primary OS, for stability (knock on wood), predictability (knock on wood?), and privacy (no wood-knocking required, with possible caveats for Ubuntu).

    I’m still very much a beginner at Linux, and my previous favorite distro was Linux Mint Cinnamon, simply because it was so easy for Windows refugees, with a familiar interface and remarkably few bugs, problems, and annoyances. Now I’m limited to distros with much more recent “known-stable” kernels that can (theoretically) support my new hardware. The candidates are:

    * Kubuntu 20.04 LTS Focal Fossa (fixed, three-year life, kernel 5.4)

    * PCLinuxOS 2020.03 KDE (rolling, kernel 5.5.10 on ISO, currently updated to kernel 5.5.19)

    * Fedora 32 KDE (fixed, short life, kernel 5.6.6)

    * Manjaro 20.0 KDE (rolling, kernel 5.6.7 on ISO, currently updatable to kernel 5.7 release candidates)

    Very cool, by the way, that gHacks announced the release of *three* of my four candidate distros! (Ubuntu, Kubuntu, tomato, tomahto…) I feel catered to! ;-)

    Fedora is my least preferred option because of its short lifespan and mixed reports on the reliability of in-place upgrades over the years, but Fedora has a good reputation for broad hardware support generally, and people had good luck with Fedora on last year’s model of my laptop specifically, so it’s there as a fallback in case I can’t get the other candidate distros to work. And if I can’t get *any* of them to work acceptably well, I’ll just have to be patient and wait for Linux to catch up, continuing to play Microsoft-cat and user-mouse with respect to privacy and borkage in the meantime.

    Anyway, I just set up a fresh YUMI-UEFI thumb drive with all of the above distros on it (plus Clonezilla), and will give each of them a “live” spin. (Hopefully, my laptop won’t stumble over YUMI-UEFI. I can always use Rufus and do one distro per drive, but I’m not made of thumb drives. ;-)

    PS: I don’t know enough about Linux (and probably never will) to take a position on systemd, but for those who do (and who care), PCLinuxOS uses SysV — as do MX Linux and Devuan, whose kernels aren’t even in the ballpark. Kubuntu, Manjaro, and Fedora use systemd.

    1. Peterc said on April 30, 2020 at 4:10 am
      Reply

      QUICK UPDATE: I’m going to have to do the Rufus one-distro-per-thumb-drive thing. Kubuntu booted and loaded fine — and it seems promising, at first blush — but the others didn’t make it all the way, and I have a hunch it’s due to YUMI-UEFI (which, to be fair, is really an ongoing beta).

    2. Robin A. Meade said on May 5, 2020 at 12:37 am
      Reply

      > Fedora is my least preferred option because of its short lifespan and mixed reports on the reliability of in-place upgrades over the years

      I have the LG Gram 17 2019 edition running Fedora 32. It’s been a great combination. Everything works except the fingerprint sensor.

      I upgraded from Fedora 31 using the graphical method:

      “Choose the Updates tab in GNOME Software and you should see a screen informing you that Fedora 32 is Now Available.”

      https://fedoramagazine.org/upgrading-fedora-31-to-fedora-32/

      Each release of Fedora is supported for 13 months. And the upgrade process is getting smoother with every release. I don’t consider the “short lifespan” to be a problem.

      1. Peterc said on May 5, 2020 at 12:39 pm
        Reply

        @Robin A. Meade:

        I really appreciate this encouraging feedback. I’m absolutely LOVING the Gram 17’s big, “taller” screen, and I would *hate* to have to give it up in order to run Linux. I was favorably impressed by my experience with a Fedora 24 derivative (Chapeau) in VirtualBox, and it was Red Hat coders who fixed the most important LibreOffice bugs I’ve reported, so Fedora is not off the table … even for an Ubuntu-derivative dummy like me.

  5. Yoda force chokes Luke.. THE END said on April 30, 2020 at 8:10 am
    Reply

    > I’ll just have to be patient and wait for Linux to catch up, continuing to play Microsoft-cat and user-mouse with respect to privacy and borkage in the meantime.

    Linux doesn’t have to catch up at all.

    Place the blame where it generally belongs: Proprietary hardware and/or software/firmware.

    Maybe stop buying proprietary shit?

    1. Peterc said on May 1, 2020 at 12:30 am
      Reply

      @Yoda force chokes Luke.. THE END:

      “Maybe stop buying proprietary shit?”

      Depending on what you’re willing to compromise on, this is sometimes more easily said than done where laptops are concerned. My eyesight is going downhill, and I strongly appreciate extra vertical real estate, so the Gram’s 17″ 16:10 display was an important selection criterion for me. Point me to a fairly priced open-source laptop that features one and I’ll consider returning the Gram. The Gram also weighs under three pounds and its battery lasts maybe 8-9 hours without taking special measures to minimize power usage. It would be nice if the open-source alternative were in the general ballpark of those specs, too.

      “Place the blame where it generally belongs: Proprietary hardware and/or software/firmware.”

      I agree 100%, but I’d go one step further and add: “and a complete abdication of public antitrust-enforcement responsibility.” The tying conspiracy Microsoft and many OEMs are participating in is indefensible. (Well … from a legal and public-policy standpoint, at least. From a captured public official’s personal financial and career standpoint, apparently not.)

  6. Kubrick said on May 1, 2020 at 12:32 pm
    Reply

    My disro hopping stopped when i installed puppy linux.Has everything i could possibly need without all the bloat and it can be installed anywhere with ease.I have used it for a couple of years with zero issues.

  7. Neil said on May 1, 2020 at 3:44 pm
    Reply

    wanted to try manjaro as currently use mint cinnamon and doesn’t know my tp-link wireless card out the box, so i need my usb2nic and run long long cable to router to make it work – kinda off putting

    OR,
    does anyone know and very good and reliable wireless dongle that will work out the box no messing about effort required

    its these little annoyances that stop some windows people from migrating

  8. Marko said on May 1, 2020 at 11:00 pm
    Reply

    Please join forces with excelent YouTube channel “LinuxScoop”, whitch do reviews of new distros.

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