Google adds temporary flag to Chrome to allow FTP protocol - gHacks Tech News

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Google adds temporary flag to Chrome to allow FTP protocol

Google revealed plans in 2015 to remove support for the FTP protocol from the company's Google Chrome web browser; several other browser makers, Mozilla in particular, announced plans to remove FTP support from their browsers, Firefox in the case of Mozilla, as well.

Mozilla introduced a preference in Firefox 60 that allowed users to disable FTP support and started to block FTP subresources in Firefox 61.

Google plans to disable support for FTP in Chrome 82 which the company plans to release in the second quarter of 2020. FTP support will be removed gradually from the Chrome web browser; here is the current schedule for the removal of FTP support:

  • Chrome 79 -- Support for FTP will be disabled in development versions of Chrome. Flag is added to Chrome to enable FTP support temporarily, and Enterprise policies are made available for controlling FTP support.
  • Chrome 80 -- FTP support is disabled gradually in stable versions of Chrome.
  • Chrome 82 -- FTP support is removed from the browser. There is no option to re-enable support for FTP in Chrome as FTP code is removed from the browser.

Chrome will defer the handling of FTP urls to the default application on the system it is run on; if a FTP client is installed and associated with the FTP protocol, it will be used to open the resource once support is removed from the web browser.

chrome enable ftp

Chrome users who require FTP support in the browser may enable an experimental (and temporary) flag to restore support for the protocol until Chrome 82 is released.

  1. Load chrome://flags in the browser's address bar.
  2. Search for Enable FTP.
  3. Set the status of the flag Enable support for FTP URLs to Enabled.
  4. Restart Chrome.

Please note that the flag will be removed from Chrome 82. It states:

Enable support for FTP URLs

When enabled, the browser will handle navigations to ftp:// URLs by either showing a directory listing or downloading the resource over FTP. When disabled, the browser has no special handling for ftp:// URLs and by default defer handling of the URL to the underlying platform. – Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS, Android

Chrome users (as well as users of other browsers that won't support FTP for much longer) may want to install a FTP client on their systems if they have not already to continue accessing FTP resources. Check out programs like FTP Rush, WinSCP, or FileZilla.

Now You: Do you require FTP access in your browser of choice? (via Techdows)

Summary
Google adds temporary flag to Chrome to allow FTP protocol
Article Name
Google adds temporary flag to Chrome to allow FTP protocol
Description
Find out how to re-enable FTP support temporarily in the Google Chrome web browser to access FTP resources in the browser.
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Ghacks Technology News
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Comments

  1. Paul(us) said on November 3, 2019 at 7:29 pm
    Reply

    Not really this because its much sensible to not hug -/slow down main browser and therefore I use a dedicated FTP program, like O&O FileDirect 1.0.0 (64 file transfer protocol).
    I personally use the much more ( In main option ?) sophisticated (And easy to handle) FileZilla 64 Bit (file-service & file transfer protocol) v. 3.45.1 (’19-09-25).

  2. Gert Finkelhoffer said on November 3, 2019 at 10:28 pm
    Reply

    I am not a computer ‘geek’. I can navigate around without much trouble, but could someone tell me how this will affect the ‘general’ user?

    1. Paul B said on November 4, 2019 at 9:44 am
      Reply

      It won’t affect the ‘general’ user in any way. It is an old style of transferring files that general users don’t use.

  3. jkl said on November 3, 2019 at 11:56 pm
    Reply

    >>> Chrome users (as well as users of other browsers that won’t support FTP for much longer) may want to install a FTP client on their systems if they have not already to continue accessing FTP resources.

    That does not sound like a problem to me, at all.

  4. Thad said on November 4, 2019 at 12:03 am
    Reply

    or File Transfer Protocol Protocol.

  5. frank said on November 4, 2019 at 4:04 am
    Reply

    Why is Google stopping ftp support anyway? I never use it but I may have need for it in the future. Does it slow down the browser or compromise security?

    1. John Fenderson said on November 4, 2019 at 5:33 pm
      Reply

      @frank:

      I can’t comment on why the browser manufacturers are removing ftp support, as I have no insight into any of that beyond public statements.

      I can comment about ftp in general, though. ftp is a protocol that has been increasingly deprecated for use over the open internet because it has some large security problems. These aren’t necessarily issues for the user, but have to do with the ability to attack the ftp servers to gain privileged access to the servers themselves. Since there are widely available alternatives that are more secure, it makes sense to stop using ftp.

      ftp is not entirely gone ftom the open internet, of course, but it’s on its way out for really solid reasons. You still find lots of ftp servers that aren’t accessible from the open internet, and this will likely be the case for a long time to come.

  6. Sajadi said on November 10, 2019 at 5:22 pm
    Reply

    A reason not to use Chromium/Chromium forks or Firefox.

    Old protocols like IRC or FTP are no danger, the are still useful and should be supported.

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