Microsoft testing new update targeting framework

Microsoft announced this week that it is testing a new update targeting framework for the upcoming Windows 10 Fall Creators Update release.

When Microsoft releases feature updates to Windows 10, these are delivered as staged roll outs and not pushed instantly to the whole Windows machine population.

There are several reasons for doing so, including bandwidth and control. While Microsoft has a powerful infrastructure in place to ship updates to users, it is not designed to distribute a Gigabyte sized update to hundreds of millions of machines on a single day.

This goes along well with the extra bit of control that a staged roll out offers. Microsoft may monitor the initial deployment on machines to catch any issues before it affects the whole Windows population.

Windows Update Targeting Framework

windows update staged rollouts

While Microsoft revealed that it is testing a new update targeting framework, it made no mention as to what is new or changed.

While we don't know anything about what has changed, we know at least where the test will take place.

Microsoft plans to test the new framework on the Windows 10 Insider Slow Ring, and there when it releases the forth Windows 10 Fall Creators Update build.

With the forth coming release of a new Windows 10 Fall Creators Update build to the Slow ring, we are testing a new update targeting framework and will be delivering the build in staggered phases. This will simulate the rollout process we use when we release major Windows 10 feature updates to retail customers.

The underlying system remains the same from a user perspective. The feature update will be rolled out to the machine population gradually.

Read also:  Windows 10: Cumulative updates KB3213522 and KB3206309

Users have options to wait until it is their machine's turn to receive the update, or may hit the "check for updates" button in the Settings app under Updates & Security > Windows Updates to bypass the queue and get the update immediately. This method works for release versions of Windows 10 as well.

There is also a third possibility, but it is only an option if Microsoft released an ISO image of the new version of Windows.

The change replicates the updating system that Microsoft used on stable versions of Windows. Microsoft made no mention as to whether it will use the system in other Insider build channels as well. It seems likely that it will keep the system in place on the Slow Ring only for the time being.

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Microsoft testing new update targeting framework
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Microsoft announced this week that it is testing a new update targeting framework for the upcoming Windows 10 Fall Creators Update release.
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Ghacks Technology News
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Responses to Microsoft testing new update targeting framework

  1. Elias Fotinis June 30, 2017 at 5:59 pm #

    Last year, my adequately-running Vista laptop started having update issues, including (but not limited to) constant excessive CPU usage from the Update service and inability to install security updates.

    This year, my smoothly-running Win7 desktop started having update issues, including (but not limited to) occasional stuttering/locking caused by the Windows Module Installer and the Windows\Logs\CBS folder getting full with multi-GB junk install logs.

    Next year, I foresee my lightning-fast Win10 ultrabook to be on its knees, laughing maniacally and probably having update issues as well.

    • TianlanSha June 30, 2017 at 7:57 pm #

      As blatant as it may sound, my take on this is that MS designed Windows to be working fine for about 10 months and after that it starts failing with things that previously weren't a problem. All of this just so you can eventually be so frustrated that you develop the need to buy a better hardware and probably a new licence for Windows.

      If they built Windows rock solid and flexible, the majority would still be using XP now, with about 60% of world population and Windows 7 and 10 would have less than 10% combined.

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