Mullvad Browser: Privacy friendly browser launched

Martin Brinkmann
Apr 3, 2023
Updated • Apr 3, 2023
Internet
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39

Look, a new web browser that is not Chromium-based. Mullvad has just launched Mullvad Browser, a privacy-first web browser that is using the Firefox web browser as its base.

Mullvad is a Swedish company that is best known for its VPN service. It was founded in 2009 in Sweden and is best known for its strong focus on privacy.

Mullvad Browser

Mullvad Browser has been developed in cooperation with the makers of the Tor web browser. Tor Browser is also based on Firefox ESR code, but it includes advanced security and privacy features. One of the main ideas behind the creation of the browser was the realization that a privacy-focused VPN may not be enough, if the tools used, in this case the web browser, would reveal information to "big tech, authorities, and data brokers". .

mullvad browser

The web browser does lots of things different when compared to the majority of web browsers out there. One of the main differentiating factors is that Mullvad has no intention of making money with the browser. It has created the browser for users of its VPN service. As such, it has been designed with privacy in mind.

Developers have removed all Telemetry from the browser, added strong anti-fingerprinting protections from the Tor project, and made private browsing mode the default browsing mode. This means that cookies, cache and the browsing history are not retained between sessions. There is also a new reset button to reset the current session and start anew.

Mullvad lists all outgoing connections that the browser makes on its own on the FAQ page on the official website:

  • Browser update (Mullvad)
  • Mullvad Browser Extension update (Mullvad)
  • Mullvad DoH (Mullvad)
  • NoScript/Ublock Origin update (Mozilla)
  • Certificates & Domains update (Mozilla)
  • Ublock Origin filter lists update (various lists)

The default security level of the browser is set to standard, to ensure compatibility with the majority of websites. Users may increase security by switching to the safer or safest levels. These disable certain features that may be used for invasive acts, but it may lead to issues on some sites.

Mullvad Browser includes several browser extensions by default, including the popular uBlock Origin content blocker and the company's own Mullvad VPN extension.

Some users may wonder why they should use Mullvad Browser if they could use Tor Browser. The main difference is that Mullvad Browser is designed to be run with Mullvad VPN. It does work with any other VPN or no-VPN connection. Tor Browser on the other hand works best with a Tor connection.

Closing Words

Mullvad Browser follows the same release schedule as Firefox ESR and Tor Browser. It can best be described as Tor Browser without Tor. The decision to make private browsing the default may cause issues for some users, considering that cookies are not stored across sessions. Frequent sign-ins may be necessary because of this.

Other than that, it is an alternative to Tor Browser and also to the Firefox web browser. Used in combination with a VPN, that does not log connections, it is improving privacy even further.

Now You: what is your take on Mullvad Browser?

Summary
Mullvad Browser: Privacy friendly browser launched
Article Name
Mullvad Browser: Privacy friendly browser launched
Description
Mullvad has just launched Mullvad Browser, a privacy-first web browser that is using the Firefox web browser as its base.
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Ghacks Technology News
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Comments

  1. Tom Hawack said on April 3, 2023 at 6:12 pm
    Reply

    “The decision to make private browsing the default may cause issues for some users, considering that cookies are not stored across sessions. Frequent sign-ins may be necessary because of this.”

    Indeed, which is why I never use Firefox’s Private Browsing : I aim to remove cookies (and localStorage) I don’t need when I exit a site, that means before I exit the browser, thanks to the dedicated ‘CookieAutodelete’ extension AND keep — allow — a cookie (and/or sometimes localStorage, choosing either or both thanks again to ‘CookieAutodelete) when I decide to. Basically a natural wish, no?

    If I dislike the rudeness of Chrome and Edge browsers I dislike as well being force-fed to virtuous environments which almost always leads to the best of one world by blocking it from another whilst an pertinent approach IMO is to conciliate freedom and privacy.

    1. Andy Prough said on April 3, 2023 at 7:35 pm
      Reply

      Just uncheck the “Always use private browsing mode” setting and add Cookie Autodelete and you are all set. That’s what I did.

      1. Tom Hawack said on April 3, 2023 at 9:11 pm
        Reply

        That’s what I do, that’s what I meant when mentioning that I never use Private Browsing but instead the ‘Cookie Autodelete’ approach, extension : removing cookies (and more) when exiting a site rather than when exiting Firefox itself. The great thing also with ‘Cookie Autodelete’ is that you can even fine tune cookies/localStorage/IndexedDB, Plugin Data, Service Workers, you can i.e. keep what is necessary for a site login and remove the extra non-necessary craps/tracking cookie(s). This extension in my experience is maybe #2 just after uBO of course.

      2. Andy Prough said on April 3, 2023 at 10:13 pm
        Reply

        >”The great thing also with ‘Cookie Autodelete’ is that you can even fine tune cookies/localStorage/IndexedDB, Plugin Data, Service Workers, you can i.e. keep what is necessary for a site login and remove the extra non-necessary craps/tracking cookie(s).”

        That’s interesting, and you can do it site-by-site. I was not aware of this, very cool, thanks Tom.

    2. TelV said on April 4, 2023 at 3:33 pm
      Reply

      @ Tom Hawack,

      You don’t need Cookie Autodelete to do the things you describe. All you need to do is to right click a site you don’t wish to retain data for and click “Forget about this site”. I use that option all the time myself and it’s never failed me yet.

      1. Tom Hawack said on April 4, 2023 at 6:08 pm
        Reply

        @TelV, the ‘Cookie Autodelete’ does automatically what ‘Forget about this site’ does on user demand. I won’t “forget about a site’ manually every time I’m about to quit a site.

        The idea is that either you keep a site’s cookie(s) either you don’t. If you don’t there’s no reason to have it (them) hang along through you whole surfing session (should they even be deleted at Firefox exit).

        Most sites install either cookies or localStorage or both in the visitor’s profile WHICH IS ABSOLUUTELY NOT FOR THE USERS’S BENEFIT, so having that non asked-for trash be removed systematically when exiting a site is what ‘Cookie Autodelete’ is meant for. Personally I can’t stand having a sticker pasted to my back on practically all sites. Rather than blocking cookies we let those clowns stick all their trash as they like it and then get their s**t removed as soon as we exit their place.

    3. owl said on April 5, 2023 at 2:25 am
      Reply

      > “The decision to make private browsing the default may cause issues for some users, Frequent sign-ins may be necessary because of this.”

      From the official FAQ:
      How do I stay logged into specific websites between sessions? #
      https://mullvad.net/en/help/tag/mullvad-browser/#105
      It’s not possible. It’s an action to combat tracking.

      Because the browser developer’s “intentions and specifications are clear,” users can even use (tweak and customize) them at their own discretion, having first understood them.
      The Mullvad Browser is developed – in collaboration between Mullvad VPN and the Tor Project – to minimize tracking and fingerprinting. But if you are looking for a quick summary, this is the place.
      https://mullvad.net/en/download/browser/windows
      You can read the full story and get the bigger picture here.
      https://mullvad.net/en/browser
      The Mullvad Browser hard facts: list of settings and modifications.
      https://mullvad.net/en/browser/hard-facts
      FAQ
      https://mullvad.net/en/help/tag/mullvad-browser/

      1. Tom Hawack said on April 5, 2023 at 6:25 pm
        Reply

        @owl, thanks for the links and for your commitment here to describe the Multivad Browser.

        From those links, from other Multivad’s Browser FAQ [https://mullvad.net/en/help/tag/mullvad-browser/], two points :

        1- Remains a bother for me :
        “How do I stay logged into specific websites between sessions? #
        It’s not possible. It’s an action to combat tracking.”

        — I don’t agree. Well configured “accepted cookies” (trans-session) are in no way a tracking issue.

        2- A plus for me, given I feared that Mullvad’s VPN was tied to Mullvad’s browser :
        “Do I have to be a Mullvad VPN user to run the Mullvad Browser?
        No, you don’t have to be a Mullvad VPN user to run the Mullvad Browser. But we highly recommend that you use a trustworthy VPN in combination with the browser.”

        “Can I use the Mullvad Browser without a VPN?
        Yes, but if you don’t use a trustworthy VPN in combination with the Mullvad Browser your IP address won’t be masked. To avoid data collectors and mass monitors to identify you thanks to your IP address (and hide your traffic from your ISP) – use a trustworthy VPN together with the Mullvad Browser.”

        — That’s a good point. Not that I’d be suspicious about their VPN but rather that I’m not fond of VPNs in general. Also, the price is affordable : 5$/month

        From there on I might give Mullvad browser a try. But I ignore if it handles two Mozilla features I use extensively :
        1- AutoConfig [https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/customizing-firefox-using-autoconfig]
        2- Group Policy (Windows) [https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/customizing-firefox-using-group-policy-windows]

        — Both are invaluable in my use of Firefox.

      2. Tom Hawack said on April 5, 2023 at 6:47 pm
        Reply

        I just discovered at [https://mullvad.net/en/download/browser/windows]

        Mullvad Browser for Windows
        Latest version: 12.0.4
        Works on Windows 10 or later (64 bit only)

        Windows 7 here. Testing Mullvad Browser will be for another day.

      3. owl said on April 10, 2023 at 10:50 am
        Reply

        @Tom Hawack,
        > Windows 7 here. Testing Mullvad Browser will be for another day.

        The official system requirements for the Windows version are,
        It is explicitly stated as Windows 10 or later (64 bit only), though,,
        Even though it stateds so, I will do not think any problem with Windows 7 or later (32-bit and 64-bit).

        Perhaps,
        In order to use “Win 7 x86” etc., which Microsoft has declared to be no longer supported, in a development and test environment, In order to use “Win 7 x86”, for example, which Microsoft has declared to be no longer supported, in a development and test environment, a (costly) support contract with Microsoft is required, Therefore, it is thought that probably because the developer side can only check the operation of “Win 10 x64” or later.

        The rationale:
        #1. Mullvad Browser is, Mozilla Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR) latest version as its platform and follows its browser “System Requirements for Firefox ESR”.
        https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/102.9.0/system-requirements/
        The current “esr102.x” is
        Windows
        Operating Systems (32-bit and 64-bit)
        Windows 7 or later

        The next milestone version “esr115.x”, is similar to the current version and appears to be no change in system requirements.

        #2. Even if you use “Mullvad VPN” on the network you use to access the Internet, the protocol is using “WireGuard and OpenVPN”.
        @TelV?
        https://www.ghacks.net/2023/04/03/mullvad-browser-privacy-friendly-browser-launched/#comment-4563194
        @Keith?
        https://www.ghacks.net/2023/04/03/the-mullvad-browser-a-privacy-focused-browser-designed-to-reduce-your-fingerprint/#comment-4563361
        The comments “Windows 7 or later” seems to indicate that there is no problem with “Windows 7 or later”.

        Notes:
        Source from official FAQ
        https://mullvad.net/en/help/tag/mullvad-browser/
        Mullvad Browser is designed with the highest priority on “browser fingerprinting” prevention, so IP addresses are not masked.
        To avoid data collectors and mass monitors to identify you thanks to your IP address (and hide your traffic from your ISP) – use a trustworthy VPN together with the Mullvad Browser.

        Below are some impressions from my trial. I hope it will be helpful to you:
        I am followed by the “official” Mullvad Browser information, leave everything in Settings (Settings) as “default”, including themes, fonts, screen size, etc, no extensions have been added, and no customizations have been made.
        ? The browser is immediately (re)activated!
        ? All data is instantly erased (by restarting the browser). Pressing the New Identity button on the toolbar will instantly restart the browser, which is extremely easy to use.
        ? The bookmark and search functions were inconvenient by as default, therefore bookmark (icon) and search (icon) were placed on the toolbar.

        For many years, I always used a customized browser.
        By default, I will have to put up with “personal preference”, and I also thought that browser extensions (Tree style tabs, ClearURLs, Cookie AutoDelete, Dark Background and Light Text, Feedbro, etc.) were absolutely necessary … .

        Well, whatever it was, I just kept on using it, and after a week or so, the discomfort was gone.

        I will continue to use “Mullvad Browser” as my default.

        For VPN, I use AdGuardVPN (build a personal VPN and connect to AdGuard VPN IPSec on demand).

        As a comprehensive measure, “simplewall, AdGuard, AdGuardVPN, WPD, and KeePass Password Safe 2” are applied at the system level to complement the browser.

        AdGuard initially used the “free” version. I was satisfied and liked it so much that I got a permanent license during a special 80% off sale (twice a year, on Black Friday and Easter). I was also able to protect my iPad, which I use regularly.

      4. owl said on April 6, 2023 at 3:33 am
        Reply

        @ Tom Hawack,
        > 1- Remains a bother for me :
        2- A plus for me, given I feared that Mullvad’s VPN was tied to Mullvad’s browser :
        From there on, I might give Mullvad browser a try. But I ignore if it handles two Mozilla features I use extensively :
        1- AutoConfig [https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/customizing-firefox-using-autoconfig]
        2- Group Policy (Windows) [https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/customizing-firefox-using-group-policy-windows]
        — Both are invaluable in my use of Firefox.

        In my opinion, and from what I understand from perusing the official information, the Mullvad Browser project is being developed with the mission of “focusing on the importance of privacy protection, educating people about it, and providing an easy-to-use browser for anyone who wishes to use it”. In short, the browser released by the project will be specialized to “specifications for all”, so expert users should, can tweak it at their own discretion without being attached to “defaults”.

        I will continue to use the “default specification of Mullvad Browser” for testing purposes, but will use other browsers (Floorp, Firefox ESR, Tor Browser, Brave) if necessary. Because I have my own settings for them (Group Policy in Firefox ESR), and am happy with the status quo.

        I also have measures in place at the system level (simplewall, AdGuard, AdGuardVPN, WPD, KeePass Password Safe 2) to complement browsers.
        However, my family is “at home, digital detox lifestyle” so there are few opportunities for practical use of digital devices and the practical device is an iPad…
        https://www.ghacks.net/2023/04/01/ios-privacy-settings-protecting-your-personal-information/#comment-4562999

  2. Andy Prough said on April 3, 2023 at 7:19 pm
    Reply

    >”Look, a new web browser that is not Chromium-based. Mullvad has just launched Mullvad Browser, a privacy-first web browser that is using the Firefox web browser as its base.”

    Of course you would never use chromium-based browsers for any kind of real privacy or security.

    This is great news, for too long Tor Browser has not worked without the Tor network, so you couldn’t use it as a good privacy general-purpose browser. Looks like (hopefully) Mullvad has stepped up to handle that situation.

    I’m writing this from my good looking new Mullvad browser. I’ll be interested to see how it compares to Librewolf.

    I like the Mullvad extension button on the toolbar. It quickly tells you about your current connection, regardless of whether or not you are using the Mullvad vpn.

  3. David said on April 3, 2023 at 7:24 pm
    Reply

    How many 3rd party FF-based browsers do we really need? We already have LibreWolf, Waterfox, and Tor. I’m just not seeing what significantly distinguishes this one from any of the rest.

    1. Claymore said on April 4, 2023 at 9:10 am
      Reply

      How many 3rd party browsers with Chromium backend do we need?
      There was a time, forks of browsers were done for good. Nowaday almost all browsers fork Chromium. It’s good to have a variety of different backends. It’s just the question how good and long a fork is being maintained. The best fork suffers from a lack of updates and fixes.

  4. Anonymous said on April 3, 2023 at 10:39 pm
    Reply

    McAfee Stinger gives a warning against Mullvad.

    PS
    I do not need an explanation that I do not need Stinger !

    1. Anonymous said on April 4, 2023 at 8:06 am
      Reply
  5. Paul(us) said on April 4, 2023 at 12:13 am
    Reply

    Amazon does not want to make money from the browser you write. But Amazon (because Mulvad VPN is also owned by Amazon.) will still have to give all the data to the big six. Not only the VPN data, but Amazon also uses your data from this browser to make money from you. That’s why they lure you with the free browser, which is much less than Tor.

    1. Anonymous said on April 4, 2023 at 2:13 am
      Reply

      >Mulvad VPN is also owned by Amazon

      Any source on this?

    2. Andy Prough said on April 4, 2023 at 3:14 am
      Reply

      Mullvad is owned by Amagicom AB, a company based in Sweden. Which, as far as I can tell, has no connection to Amazon.

      So, it appears you have no clue what you are talking about.

    3. David said on April 4, 2023 at 1:46 pm
      Reply

      Mullvad VPN AB is owned by parent company Amagicom AB. The name Amagicom is derived from the Sumerian word ama-gi – the oldest word for “freedom” or, literally, “back to mother” in the context of slavery – and the abbreviation for communication. Amagicom stands for “free communication”. Mullvad VPN AB and its parent company Amagicom AB are 100% owned by founders Fredrik Strömberg and Daniel Berntsson who are actively involved in the company.
      https://mullvad.net/en/about

    4. Karl said on April 6, 2023 at 11:17 pm
      Reply

      “But Amazon (because Mulvad VPN is also owned by Amazon.)”

      I do not use Mullvad but I do know that they have never been owned by Amazon. Why even write such foolish comment?

  6. Tony said on April 4, 2023 at 1:00 am
    Reply

    @Paul(us) Mulvad owned by Amazon? Please provide citation. I was able to come up with the following:

    “Mullvad AB is the company that owns Mullvad, which is a subsidiary of Amagicom AB. Both companies are owned by the same people, Fredrik Strömberg and Daniel Berntsson”

  7. Gerard said on April 4, 2023 at 12:51 pm
    Reply

    “It can best be described as Tor Browser without Tor. ”
    “NoScript/Ublock Origin update (Mozilla)”

    So Mullvad Browser is essentialy a tweaked Firefox + NoScript + Ublock Origin?
    In that case, why not simply use a tweaked Firefox + NoScript + Ublock Origin instead?
    Just wondering.

    1. owl said on April 5, 2023 at 1:35 am
      Reply

      What’s the difference between the Tor Browser and the Mullvad Browser?
      https://mullvad.net/en/help/tag/mullvad-browser/#94
      The difference is the network used to access the internet.
      Tor Browser connects to the internet through the Tor Network.
      The Mullvad Browser is instead designed to be used with a VPN.

      1. owl said on April 5, 2023 at 1:47 am
        Reply

        Differences with Tor Browser
        https://mullvad.net/en/browser/hard-facts
        No Tor Network patches
        No multilanguage support
        No onboarding patches
        Different branding/installer metadata
        WebRTC is enabled
        Web Audio API is enabled (needed for WebRTC)
        uBlock Origin / Mullvad Browser Extension
        NoScript Cross-tab Identity Leak Protection is disabled by default
        Mullvad DoH
        A Tor Browser specific cryptocurrency targeted protection is removed
        No drag and drop protections (it’s a specific proxy-bypass measure)
        No download warning popup (the one that says that you should use Tails to open downloads)

  8. owl said on April 4, 2023 at 2:11 pm
    Reply

    In my case, my regular browser on Windows is “Floorp”, but I will try Mullvad Browser.
    I used Mullvad Browser for this post.

    If you want to add a new extension (addons.mozilla.org) to Mullvad Browser, the browser’s add-on manager (about:addons) does not provide the ability to add add-ons, so add can add it using the official “Extensions” page below.
    https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/extensions/
    For extensions not listed on that page, you can add the xpi file manually.
    How to do it: In the browser’s Add-ons Manager (about:addons), click Install Add-on From File… in the browser’s Add-ons Manager (about:addons).

    About Floorp
    Floorp (made in Japan, but multilingual versions are available) is based on the latest version of Firefox ESR as its platform.
    GitHub – Floorp-Projects/Floorp: The source code of version 10 or later of Floorp Browser, the most Advanced and Fastest Firefox derivative
    https://github.com/Floorp-Projects/Floorp

    1. john said on April 4, 2023 at 5:25 pm
      Reply

      Hello,
      I’ve installed floccus from the xpi, but the icon in the toolbar is not visible, so I cannot use it.

      1. owl said on April 4, 2023 at 11:31 pm
        Reply

        @john,
        > I’ve installed floccus from the xpi, but the icon in the toolbar is not visible, so I cannot use it.

        Click on >> on the right side of the toolbar to pull down the “Overflow Menu”.
        Click “Customize Toolbar” at the bottom of the Overflow Menu, and you will find an icon that is not displayed.
        Drag and paste it to the desired location, and finally click [Done] at the bottom right of the screen.
        That will get you the results you were hoping for.

        Alternative Methods:
        You can also access the “Customize Toolbar” by right-clicking in the free space (area without tabs or buttons) at the top of the screen.
        Also, if the “Menu bar” is set to On, go to “View” > “Customize Toolbar”.

      2. john said on April 5, 2023 at 11:39 am
        Reply

        @owl

        thank for answering but customizing the toolbar didn’t work.

        I was told to go into about:addons and configure the extension to run in private windows. this fixed the issue.

    2. owl said on April 5, 2023 at 1:50 am
      Reply

      From the official FAQ:
      Why don’t you have more features within the Mullvad Browser?
      https://mullvad.net/en/help/tag/mullvad-browser/#96
      We focus on privacy first. Too many features could make it possible to identify you through fingerprinting.

      Can I install other extensions?
      https://mullvad.net/en/help/tag/mullvad-browser/#97
      Yes, but that is something we don’t recommend. Extensions could make it possible to identify you through fingerprinting.

    3. owl said on April 5, 2023 at 4:25 am
      Reply

      Here is a summary and citation based on first impressions and official FAQs:
      Mullvad Browser (made in Sweden) is,
      through a collaboration between Mullvad VPN and Tor Project, to minimize tracking and fingerprinting, The latest version of Mozilla Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR) was developed as the platform.
      *Intentionally, only the English (en-US) version is release.
      //mullvad.net/en/help/tag/mullvad-browser
      And to achieve the best “privacy protection”,
      “IP address” and “Cookies” is not the only measure,
      Fingerprinting resistance is also an important issue,
      Therefore, It is recommended that to use the default settings (including screen size) without “adding extensions” or “customization”.

      What’s the difference between the Tor Browser and the Mullvad Browser?
      https://mullvad.net/en/help/tag/mullvad-browser/#94
      The difference is the network used to access the internet.
      Tor Browser connects to the internet through the Tor Network.
      The Mullvad Browser is instead designed to be used with a VPN.

      Differences with Tor Browser
      https://mullvad.net/en/browser/hard-facts
      No Tor Network patches
      No multilanguage support
      No onboarding patches
      Different branding/installer metadata
      WebRTC is enabled
      Web Audio API is enabled (needed for WebRTC)
      uBlock Origin / Mullvad Browser Extension
      NoScript Cross-tab Identity Leak Protection is disabled by default
      Mullvad DoH
      A Tor Browser specific cryptocurrency targeted protection is removed
      No drag and drop protections (it’s a specific proxy-bypass measure)
      No download warning popup (the one that says that you should use Tails to open downloads)

      What to look for when choosing a browser
      https://mullvad.net/en/browser/things-to-look-for-when-choosing-a-browser
      Quoting the main points:
      Let’s start with the obvious: don’t pick a browser whose core purpose is to collect data from you. Aka: big tech browsers.
      some browsers are entirely designed to collect your data.
      “Chrome collects your IP address, the words you search for, the videos you watch, the pages you visit, the ads you click, your purchase activity, the network of people you’re in touch with, and much more. All facets of your life are scrupulously collected, analyzed and assembled into an intimate profile: a data text that aims to describe what makes you you.”

      And there are several other browsers today that limit things like third-party-based tracking. However, as a result of this, advertisers and others interested in capitalizing on your behavioral data have invested in other tactics for tracking users around the web. In other words: it’s become more important for them to use browser fingerprinting.

      Especially now, with browsers blocking third-party resources and cookies are under legal attack, advertisers and other data gatherers are looking for other solutions.

      But the irony is that your attempts to block trackers could be the one thing to make you uniquely identifiable. The more protection you use, the higher the risk that you will be exposed with a unique browser fingerprint.

      That’s why the Mullvad Browser only uses uBlock Origin to block third-party trackers, for instance.

      Browser fingerprinting – tracking behind the curtain
      https://mullvad.net/en/browser/browser-fingerprinting
      Its preface:
      When it comes to mass surveillance, browser fingerprinting as a means for tracking people, isn’t as straightforward as tracking via IP addresses and cookies. Your IP address has a direct link to you as a person, cookies are locally saved on your specific device; there’s no doubt whatsoever that those techniques are used to gathering information about you and to follow you all over the internet over time. This is not the case for browser fingerprinting – which creates a very different challenge.

      All together as one: This is how the Mullvad Browser works
      https://mullvad.net/en/browser/mullvad-browser
      Its preface:
      What’s important when you develop a privacy-focused browser? In our world there’s only one method to strive for, and it’s a classic: hide in the crowd. Just like the Tor Browser, the Mullvad Browser has been developed with the purpose and ambition for all its users to appear as one (if you have the same ambition: use a trustworthy VPN together with the browser). When you have that aspiration and goal, it’s critical to choose carefully. With an internet infrastructure loaded with different tracking techniques, it could be tempting to offer as many cool features as possible to stop and block them. But the irony is: your attempt to block trackers could be the one thing to reveal you.

      Sometimes having no specific defense is better than having one. By wanting to increase online privacy, you install extensions that in the end make you even more visible than before.

      The Mullvad Browser hard facts: list of settings and modifications
      https://mullvad.net/en/browser/hard-facts

      FAQ
      https://mullvad.net/en/help/tag/mullvad-browser/

      For more information, please see below:
      https://mullvad.net/en/browser

  9. TelV said on April 4, 2023 at 3:56 pm
    Reply

    According to the download link Martin posted you need Windows 10 minimum to use the Mullvad browser so it wouldn’t be any good to me since I’m using Win 8.1

    However, I’ve been using their VPN for the past 6 years or so in combination with the independent Wireguard app and the two work perfectly together.

    But like owl, I’m also using the Floorp browser which I’m quite content with. For the very rare occasions that Floorp won’t load a site, I switch to Firefox.

    1. Anonymous said on April 4, 2023 at 4:04 pm
      Reply

      it works just fine on windows 7/8.1 – ESR102 (and ESR115 to come) are still supported on these platforms

    2. owl said on April 10, 2023 at 11:09 am
      Reply

      @TelV, it’s been six months.
      I have been away from the web for a long time, forced to recuperate from a serious injury in addition to my digital detox lifestyle.
      Glad to see that you are loving the Floorp browser.

      @TelV,
      > need Windows 10 minimum to use the Mullvad browser so it wouldn’t be any good to me since I’m using Win 8.1
      > However, I’ve been using their VPN for the past 6 years or so in combination with the independent Wireguard app and the two work perfectly together.

      By the way, Mullvad Browser is great too.
      Please see below.
      https://www.ghacks.net/2023/04/03/mullvad-browser-privacy-friendly-browser-launched/#comment-4563581

      Well, I can’t get too involved web, since I live a digital detox lifestyle. And now that the “iPad” is my regular machine…
      Best regards.

  10. Tachy said on April 21, 2023 at 1:44 am
    Reply

    How do I “force” Mulvad Broswer to start maximized?

    PLEASE! I do not want nor need a speech on fingerprinting.

    I’ve already disabled the letterboxing, and the warning about disabling letterboxing, now I just need to figure out how to make it start maximized.

    And why is the Comic-Sans font not available? It’s my favorite font.

  11. Tachy said on April 21, 2023 at 2:09 am
    Reply

    Ok, HUGE problem.

    Noscript is set to not block anything at all and any settings I change are not saved.

    UBO is fine, I imported my settings from FFESR and they stick

    NoScript keeps defaulting to allowing everything.

    I did install the browser to my user folder to avoid write permissions issues.

    1. Tachy said on April 21, 2023 at 2:19 am
      Reply

      Oh ehll!

      It’s been so long I forgot I had this same issue with TOR.

      You have to open the NoScript options and check “Override Mullvad Browser’s Security Level Preset”

      Then NoScript will retain all your settings.

      This is important because the blah blah security preset is set to allow everything.

  12. Tachy said on April 21, 2023 at 2:25 am
    Reply

    Ok, new problem.

    Mulvad browser is forcing my DNS requests through thier own DNS bypassing the DNS I want to use.

    How can I fix this?

    IP Address details
    IP: 193.138.218.118
    ISP: 31173 Services AB
    AirVPN Exit Node: No No
    ASN: 39351
    Country: Sweden Sweden (SE)
    Region: Skåne County (M)
    City: Malmo
    Time Zone: Europe/Stockholm
    Latitude & Longitude: 55.6078 , 12.9982
    Geolocation map (Google Map) based on IP Address
    Activate
    Accuracy Radius: 20 KM
    Last data update: Fri, 21 Apr 2023 00:24:49 +0000

    1. Tachy said on April 21, 2023 at 2:32 am
      Reply

      Maybe I should look harder before I ask questions? LOL

      Had to disable “Enable DNS over HTTPS”. I don’t want this on when using a VPN because it bypasses the VPN.

      Still trying to get it to start maximized…..

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