Fing for Android displays devices that are connected to a wireless network - gHacks Tech News

Fing for Android displays devices that are connected to a wireless network

Do you know which devices are connected to a wireless network that your computer or mobile device is connected to? Knowing this can be very useful in several situations.

It can be helpful to troubleshoot connectivity issues for example, check the IP addresses and network names of devices quickly, or to make sure that no neighbor or third-party managed to crack the password to use your wireless network without authorization.

Fing - Network Tools for Android is a great application for all Android devices version 2.1 and up that lists the connected devices in a matter of seconds after start.

The app displays the wireless network the Android device is connected to and the IP address (IPv4) and Mac address of other devices as well as their network name and manufacturer.

wireless network devices

A tap on any of the devices displays detailed information about it. This includes IP and MAC address, hostname, vendor, and first time it was recognized on the network.

A set of tools are provided that you can run right from there as well. Supported are ping and traceroute for example, and a scan of supported services on the device.

This displays the open ports and their functionality again with options such as testing the connection or opening a browser to connect to the device.

Another interesting option is that you can add a name and notes to devices. It may for instance be useful to add descriptive names to cryptic devices so that you know what their purpose is (print server instead of Wintermute for instance). Doing so replaces the actual name of the device.

The preferences of the application display quite a few options as well. Preferences are divided into tools that you can run from there right away, host tools to run traceroute or wake on lane commands on any network address, general configuration preferences and backup and restoration options.

You can use the network discovery part to scan the wireless network you are connected to, check your networks that have already been discovered, and discover an IP network by entering an IP address or hostname and ports.

General preferences include options to set the maximum network size and to add or remove TCP services (ports). This can be useful if you need to check custom ports or don't require the scanning of supported ports.

Closing Words

Fing - Network Tools is a useful application for Android that comes in handy on several occasions. From checking the wireless network quickly to make sure it is free of intruders to using it to troubleshoot connection problems in the local network.

Summary
software image
Author Rating
1star1star1star1star1star
no rating based on 0 votes
Software Name
Fing - Network Tools
Operating System
Android
Landing Page
Advertisement

We need your help

Advertising revenue is falling fast across the Internet, and independently-run sites like Ghacks are hit hardest by it. The advertising model in its current form is coming to an end, and we have to find other ways to continue operating this site.

We are committed to keeping our content free and independent, which means no paywalls, no sponsored posts, no annoying ad formats or subscription fees.

If you like our content, and would like to help, please consider making a contribution:


Previous Post: «
Next Post: »

Comments

  1. no said on November 1, 2014 at 10:16 pm
    Reply

    thanx for publicizing this gem.

    I think you should change the title to Fing instead of Find..

    It’s also available on ios

    1. Martin Brinkmann said on November 1, 2014 at 11:25 pm
      Reply

      Thanks, corrected.

  2. Karl Gephart said on November 1, 2014 at 10:55 pm
    Reply

    Very nice, Martin! Thanks!

  3. CHEF-KOCH said on November 2, 2014 at 4:21 am
    Reply

    Or without tools, I guess every pro have connectbot or android terminal installed, just use:
    cat wifi_device_log.log | grep wlan

  4. TQT said on November 2, 2014 at 6:30 pm
    Reply

    Do they collect information of the network?

  5. Uhtred said on November 2, 2014 at 6:38 pm
    Reply

    popped it on my iphone and for a moment thought eek! then realised that the extra item was the router!
    its not so easy to understand for the not so technical, the list of connected networks is ok, but it doesnt seem to offer explanation for some things, like max network size/nodes etc

Leave a Reply

Check the box to consent to your data being stored in line with the guidelines set out in our privacy policy

Please note that your comment may not appear immediately after you post it.