How to update the Microsoft Edge web browser - gHacks Tech News

How to update the Microsoft Edge web browser

Microsoft launched the web browser Microsoft Edge as the default system browser of the Windows 10 operating system. The company made Edge the default browser but distributes Microsoft Internet Explorer 11 as well with the operating system.

Microsoft Edge is integrated in Windows 10; it is not available for any other version of Windows and it appears that Microsoft has no intention to change that. The company did release Microsoft Edge for Google's Android and Apple's iOS operating systems, however.

The following guide is about updating the desktop version of Microsoft Edge. If you want to update the Android version of Edge or the iOS version, check out the official Stores to do so.

How to update Edge

windows microsoft february 2018 updates

Microsoft Edge is not available as a separate download. Windows users can't download a web installer or the most recent version of Microsoft Edge to install it on a device running Windows 10.

Microsoft Edge is updated through Windows Update primarily. Administrators and users need to distinguish between two types of updates:

  • Cumulative updates for Windows 10 that update Microsoft Edge to a new minor version.
  • Feature updates for Windows 10 that update Edge to a new major version.

Cumulative updates increase Edge's version slightly and feature updates in a major way. If you check the version of Microsoft Edge on a Windows 10 Fall Creators Update system, you will notice that it returns version 41.x. The same check on a Spring Creators Update system returns the version as 42.x right now.

In other words: Microsoft Edge's version is directly related to the feature update version of Windows 10 installed on the PC.

It is impossible to update Edge to a new version of the browser that Microsoft introduced in a newer feature update.

If you run a system with the Anniversary Update of Windows 10, you cannot update Edge to the version introduced in the Fall Creators Update or Spring Creators update.

The only option you have is to upgrade the Windows 10 machine to a newer feature update version to update Edge at the same time.

Microsoft releases security updates for earlier versions of Microsoft Edge provided that the feature update version of Windows 10 is still supported by the company. New features, however, do get introduced in versions of Edge released in more recent feature updates.

How to update Microsoft Edge

download microsoft edge update

  1. Use the keyboard shortcut Windows-I to open the Settings app
  2. Select Update & Security.
  3. Make sure Windows Update is selected.
  4. Click on "check for updates" to run a manual check for updates.
  5. Download any new cumulative update that is offered to you.
  6. Tip: You may also want to download the most recent Adobe Flash Player version to make sure it is up to date.

Microsoft Edge versions

Microsoft maintains different versions of the Edge browser:

  • Windows 10 Insider Builds -- The most recent version of Edge.
  • Windows 10 Feature Update, current -- The most recent stable version of Edge.
  • Windows 10 Feature Updates, previous -- Older versions of Microsoft Edge that lack features.

Check the version of Microsoft Edge

microsoft edge version

You can check the installed version of Microsoft Edge in the following way:

  1. Open the Microsoft Edge web browser.
  2. Select the menu icon (...) and then Settings from the menu that opens.
  3. Scroll all the way down to the "about this app" section.

Edge lists its version and the version of EdgeHTML.

Note: Websites and download portals that claim that they offer Microsoft Edge downloads, don't. They either redirect you to Microsoft's Edge homepage (where you can't download the browser), or to the mobile app stores where you can download the mobile version of Microsoft Edge for Android or iOS.

Now you: Have you tried Edge? What is your take?

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Summary
How to update the Microsoft Edge web browser
Article Name
How to update the Microsoft Edge web browser
Description
Find out about the nuances of updating the default Windows 10 web browser Microsoft Edge to make sure you run the latest version of the browser.
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Ghacks Technology News
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Comments

  1. Anonymous said on March 18, 2018 at 4:44 pm
    Reply

    This is not ‘how to update’. You can’t even choose which update you want. This is unlike Windows 7 where you can update Internet Explorer and Net Framework separately.

    Home users cannot even disable the updates, so the updates will be installed whether you like it or not.
    There’s no ‘how to update’ at all in Windows 10.

    1. Mola Ram, CEO Microsoft said on March 19, 2018 at 2:13 am
      Reply

      Windows Enterprise LTSB is the only borderline usable version of Windows, so naturally Microsoft makes it nearly impossible to get. Unless you’re Chinese, because there is a Chinese version without telemetry and updates. Still waiting for an answer why the Chinese Communist government gets a spyware-free version but US consumers are subjected to Microsoft’s espionage and update extortion.

      How to update Edge: install firefox.exe.

      1. LOL said on March 22, 2018 at 2:39 pm
        Reply

        install firefox? HAHAHAHAHA

  2. Dave said on March 18, 2018 at 6:30 pm
    Reply

    I use Edge when I’m going to actually login to a site.

    Other then the facts that it’s ugly and it seems purposely designed to hide controls (you must click “import favorites from another browser” before you can even find the “export favorites” button) I like it.

    When used in conjunction with cortana (only the search function, I use a local account, I’m not ‘signed in’ to the cortana app, and I have every other cortana toggle off) it’s a very slick browser.

    I didn’t start using it until the TamperMonkey extension for it came out. Now I can easily apply my favorite styles where ever I want.

    Edge is not a stand alone program like FF. It’s the part of the OS you see web pages with.

    1. dark said on March 18, 2018 at 7:08 pm
      Reply

      “Edge is not a stand alone program like FF. It’s the part of the OS you see web pages with.”

      And that’s why Edge is bad because it’s part of the OS. FF and any other browser would be much safer because it not part of the OS.

      1. Heimen Stoffels said on March 19, 2018 at 8:28 pm
        Reply

        So you mean that Firefox on FirefoxOS is also unsafe as it’s part of the OS there? And Chrome on Android is also unsafe because it’s also part of the OS (you can disable it, but not remove it unless you root the device and will still receive updates either way)?

      2. batman said on June 15, 2018 at 12:30 am
        Reply

        you hack Edge you have access to the entire computer O/S, you hack FF or Chrome or other browser you access to only that specific app custom O/S, you don’t have access to the computer

  3. MikeK said on March 18, 2018 at 6:33 pm
    Reply

    I have to say, Edge has been ok but I just can’t stand the bookmark manager. I use Bookmark OS

  4. Tom Hawack said on March 18, 2018 at 6:40 pm
    Reply

    The best is yet to come…

    “Microsoft announces opening Windows 10 Mail app links in Edge despite default browser, Internet loses its mind”

    Read on [https://tinyurl.com/ybxfhbdk] and on many other pages, it’s an announement only at this time, guess the company is testing the reactions and given what they are (words, big bad ones) should the company carry on that we’d cry on such foolishness. They can’t get their damn browser to be adopted so they use the Windows 10 tactic : enforcement.

  5. jason said on March 18, 2018 at 8:04 pm
    Reply

    any way to emove edge uninstall it from pc?

    I like edge but because you wont let me open a new tab to my default home page or page of MY choice and because its now obvioius your never gona do that, I wont use it and would happily remove it from windows 10.

    I know microsoft doesn’t really like customers, the insider is all about pretence.

    1. dark said on March 18, 2018 at 10:21 pm
      Reply

      Probably with powershell you can remove edge.

      1. p_johnson said on March 19, 2018 at 9:54 am
        Reply

        @dark is there any guide for this? i am not tech savvy at all. i am afraid i may do something that will break windows. i want to get rid of it. if you find any guide please let us know.

      2. dark said on March 20, 2018 at 3:35 am
        Reply

        I wouldn’t recommend removing Edge though cuz it will likely break Windows 10 to some extent cuz Edge is deeply woven into Windows system which is bad from security standpoint.

      3. Declan said on March 20, 2018 at 3:23 pm
        Reply

        Correct. Remember back in the early 2000’s when Microsoft proudly said that Internet Explorer couldn’t be uninstalled because it was embedded as part of Windows? And part of that problem was because most all default Internet links were directed through IE, even if you had a different browser installed?

        Well then lawsuits started flying all around the world and Microsoft was forced to split IE from the main Windows OS. If Microsoft continues to force users toward Edge the way they did with the Win-10 upgrade, then I would imagine a replay of what happened almost 20 years ago.

  6. Paul(us) said on March 18, 2018 at 8:11 pm
    Reply

    I am personly never using on main windows 10 pro. version 16299.309 the Microsoft Edge 41.16299.248.0 (Microsoft EdgeHTML 16.16299).
    This because there are not only enough (web) extension for it, its slow in speed but also not well maintained.

    The only thing I am wondering about it is or the version that I have installed on the main version is the latest version?
    This because I see here above on the last picture in your article an outer lower number?
    Is this because you wrought this article some time ago?

  7. p_johnson said on March 18, 2018 at 9:12 pm
    Reply

    thank you martin for the update guide, but i would like to uninstall it, not to update it. how can i remove this malware from my pc? i read above that it is going to hijack the mail app???? is there any way to uninstall it?

  8. Stefan said on March 19, 2018 at 10:33 am
    Reply

    Edge – a web browser ? Hahahahahahaha ! Todays laugh……

  9. Sophie said on March 19, 2018 at 11:51 am
    Reply

    Gosh….Microsoft have so lost their way. Nothing much left but nostalgia.

  10. Sophie said on March 19, 2018 at 2:09 pm
    Reply

    The real story here…..dear Ghacks readers, is one that I think Martin has yet to publish. It is that soon, or shortly, will force Edge onto people…as far as email links are concerned:

    I quote:

    Microsoft is looking to force users into using its Edge browser, by making it default for opening links from email.
    Having struggled to entice users to ditch market-leader Chrome, or even its older, now decommissioned Internet Explorer, Microsoft is going to try and force it on people.

    This is now becoming more than poor. Hang your heads in shame Microsoft. Do it now.

    1. Tom Hawack said on March 19, 2018 at 2:32 pm
      Reply

      So true, Sophie. Gary Speare, an American author I just discovered while searching for quotes about force and counter force, has called my attention with perhaps an erroneous assertion:

      “For every force, there is a counter force. For every negative there is a positive. For every action there is a reaction. For every cause there is an effect.”

      If I agree with action to reaction and cause to effect, obviously there is no counter force to Microsoft, at this time anyway.

      That’ll be my introduction to Martin’s book :=)

      1. Sophie said on March 19, 2018 at 2:42 pm
        Reply

        Nice to read you Tom. A further digestion of this development, just for the sake of clarity, is that this [may?] only to be “tested” as an idea, and that feedback is being sought…

        I am unfortunately a little cautious where Microsoft is concerned, about the idea of “feedback being sought”, because I do not have the impression that Microsoft usually listen a great deal.

        Also for the sake of clarity, it would only be email links coming from their own “Windows Mail app”, and therefore should not affect all that many people.

        Still, that is not really the issue. The issue is that a company can see fit to override our own settings, and make software behave as they think is in our best interests. This pattern of behaviour is replicated over and over again with MS these days, and they are something now….of a runaway train…

      2. Tom Hawack said on March 19, 2018 at 3:09 pm
        Reply

        I had chosen in my first post to mention one of the softest articles about this Microsoft announcement concerning an Edge enforcement for reading emails. It seems you are right when you clarify with “[…]it would only be email links coming from their own “Windows Mail app”, and therefore should not affect all that many people.”. Indeed. I also read a journalist mentioning — half-hilarious, half-sarcastic, that in his opinion users of “Windows Mail app” most likely already use Edge … lol. Nevertheless the announcement denotes for the least a policy’s nerve to wipe what many consider as essentials (freedom) on the ground of… of what exactly? The superiority of Edge in the land of browsers, known by the developer but aiming a population which still hasn’t understood the exceptional quality of Windows and of all of its components, which should therefor be pushed in the right direction, that of their very advantages, for their good? That reminds me a country’s leader, on the East side.

        Let’s be diplomatic: I’m skeptical.

        But all this is known, widely known and accepted, because there’s nothing which can be done in the face of monopoly. Unless to choose another department, Linux and/or Mac (opposite in their policies, aligned in their opposition to Microsoft). Meanwhile many postpone the worst by taking care of their now OS, be it 7 or 8. After? My bet is that 90%+ of those who now insult an OS and its leading browser will tomorrow adopt it. That’s Microsoft’s bet as well, its the bet of all companies which have got to such a level of power that they know that whatever people say, words will vanish and behaviors will turn. I hope to remain in the 10%.

      3. dark said on March 20, 2018 at 3:28 am
        Reply

        There is counter force to Microsoft, it’s called Linux.

  11. Sophie said on March 19, 2018 at 4:46 pm
    Reply

    @Tom – the problem is that many of us no longer think the actions of Microsoft are honorable. The liberties they have taken over the months/years have chipped away at us all. You only need to look at the many [many] threads, commentaries, articles of people desperate to stop updates and gain control. In a sense, all these subjects return to one main issue….that being the loss of control.

    The problem with this loss of control, is that our Operating Systems (yes, I know they’re not supposed to be ours and more, and we are the product), but our Operating Systems are not – for example – like a digital video recorder, where we accept a simple interface, we hope our television programmes have recorded and we can later watch them. No! The problems is that they hold our lives, sometimes our secrets, our work, as professionals or students….our projects, our music, our photography.

    When an overreaching, overbearing company tries to impose itself, only looking for market share and monetization, they forget that they might impact on a great deal. And trust lost is incredibly hard to regain. There is a pattern in Microsofts’ behaviour that has been there for a long time now….I recall when I first set up Windows 10, how hard I had to fight with it (I mean REALLY fight), in order to retain settings I had chosen. Over and over again, Microsoft reset things, took my settings away, and put them back how they wanted them. In the end, I resolved this by virtually completely removing the Action Center, not just turning it off, and suppressing everything I could, including the virtual removal of Cortana (not just disabled, but gone from Task Manager too).

    It should not be like this. We must have choice………and look how our choices are being removed in the relentless data gathering exercises undertaken by many companies, and in Microsoft’s case, the telemetry that supposedly can’t be turned off.

    Ultimately, choice is removed, and I fully understand why you wish to retain an “un” updated Windows 7 for as long as you can.

    I wanted to clarify that it was being ‘tested’ and only from the Mail App, to be fair to Microsoft…because it may well never make it into released software, via Updates.

    But for me, I am only a silent (and frustrated) observer. None of these things affect me, because as you know, I have clamped down heavily on Windows, and am lucky to have taken enough mitigating actions by now, to have complete and utter “silence” from my operating system. Nothing ever changes, unless I change it…….despite what some commentators might say in reply to this, I truly have not had a single peep out of my machine for a year, and I don’t expect to. I have tamed it well! My choices are mine, and can’t be overruled!!

    The price to pay of course, is security updates……….but when you reason that the malevolence out there is really the maker of the operating system, and not the perceived “threats”, many of which are not even in the wild, then I can live with that. I back up and clone all the time. My PC is mine, and I will not suffer this action on the part of Edge, now or any time soon.

    So I too, as you, hope to remain under the radar……..your 10% / my silence.

    But you are right…..things are being dumbed down, and the many that complain will ultimately surrender. Not because they want to, but because they either don’t have the knowledge or the time to do anything else.

  12. Mike said on March 19, 2018 at 5:59 pm
    Reply

    I have tried Edge, but I find that unless you are running a low-end Windows 10 device, there is really no real good reason to use it, other than to download a different browser. Edge really isn’t significantly better than the competition when it comes to speed or battery efficiency and the lack of consistent feature updates means that it will always be behind it’s competition in this regard. Edge pretty much sits dormant on my PC and I don’t see that changing anytime soon.

  13. John in Mtl said on March 19, 2018 at 8:20 pm
    Reply

    Quote: “Microsoft Edge is integrated in Windows 10; it is not available for any other version of Windows and it appears that Microsoft has no intention to change that.”

    Well, that’s ONE GOOD THING Microsoft is doing right!

    1. batman said on June 15, 2018 at 12:37 am
      Reply

      really, why? if an hacker website access Edge it will have access to Windows 10 as well, the whole computer theoretically , FF and Chrome run on their own indipendent O/S
      Also, let’s say I need to stay with Edge version 40 for testing purposes,,, I cannot do that
      Also, Microsoft doesn’t fully comply with html5, css3, and other web programming standards, lots’ of things have to be manually customized for Edge, in the code is not unusual to see IF condition to select custom code to run specifically for Microsoft vs other browsers

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