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Disable TPM, Secure Boot and RAM requirements for Windows 11 with the latest Rufus beta

It has been a week since Windows 11 was released to the stable channel. The reception to the new iteration has been lukewarm for the most part, with most complaints targeting the Centered taskbar, Start Menu, and of course the hardware requirements that many believe have been unfairly imposed by Microsoft.

pc health check windows 11 requirements

Use the PC Health Check app to find out if your system can run Windows 11. If you have an old computer that isn't supported by the new OS, take a look at our instructions where we show you how to install Windows 11 without TPM 2.0. There are several ways to do that, and now we have another option to bypass the restrictions, thanks to Rufus. The popular bootable media creation tool was updated over the weekend, to a beta version. Rufus Beta 2 lets you disable TMP, Secure Boot and RAM requirements for Windows 11.

This is the change-log of the update from GitHub.

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  • Fix ISO mode support for Red Hat 8.2+ and derivatives
  • Fix BIOS boot support for Arch derivatives
  • Fix removal of some boot entries for Ubuntu derivatives
  • Fix log not being saved on exit
  • Add Windows 11 "Extended" installation support (Disables TPM/Secure Boot/RAM requirements)
  • Add UEFI Shell ISO downloads (retroactively applied through FIDO)
  • Add support for Intel NUC card readers
  • Improve Windows 11 support
  • Improve Windows version reporting
  • Speed up clearing of MBR/GPT

Here's how to use the program. Before proceeding, make sure you have a USB flash drive that has a storage capacity of 8GB or more, for creating the bootable media. Please take a backup of any data, pictures or videos, that is on the flash drive before you go ahead, as formatting the thumb drive will erase all contents on it.

How to disable TPM, Secure Boot and RAM requirements for Windows 11

1. Go to the official website and download the latest beta release. At the time of writing this article, the current build is Rufus Beta 2 (rufus-3.16_BETA2.exe)

2. It's a portable program, run the EXE, and its interface should pop-up.

3. Select the USB drive that you want to use. Pay attention to the Drive Letter, Volume Label if you have more than one storage device plugged into your computer, and choose the correct one.

4. The next step is to make the boot selection, choose the third option "Disk or ISO Image".

5. Click the Select button, and navigate to the location of the folder that contains the Windows 11 ISO.

Note: If you don't have an ISO handy, check our article on how to download Windows 11. Rufus can also be used to download the image directly using Fido, from the same developer. To use it, click the arrow icon next to the Select button, and hit the download option.

6. Once you have done the above, some new menus will become available. The one we are interested in, is the Image Option menu. By default, it says Standard Windows 11 Installation. Click it and set the 2nd option, Extended Windows 11 Installation (no TPM, no Secure Boot, 8GB- RAM).

7. Leave all the other options at their default settings, i.e., the partition scheme, target system, Volume Label, File System and Cluster Size. Advanced users may customize the options as required.

How to disable TPM, Secure Boot and RAM requirements for Windows 11

Note: The quick format option is enabled by default, and will erase all data on your USB Drive.

8. You should see the "Ready" status at the bottom. Click the Start button to begin creating your bootable Windows 11 ISO without TPM, Secure Boot and RAM requirements.

Wait for Rufus to finish the task. Once it completes the job, you can use your bootable media to install or upgrade your operating system to Windows 11 on an unsupported computer.

Summary
Disable TPM, Secure Boot and RAM requirements for Windows 11 with the latest Rufus beta
Article Name
Disable TPM, Secure Boot and RAM requirements for Windows 11 with the latest Rufus beta
Description
Got an old computer that isn't supported by Windows 11? Rufus allows you to create a bootable drive by disabling TPM, Secure Boot and RAM requirements.
Author
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Ghacks Technology News
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Comments

  1. Albert Piscene said on October 11, 2021 at 11:22 am
    Reply

    Why is it that almost all articles like this are concentrating on TPM?
    My laptop meets all but one of the criteria for installing Windows 11.
    The only thing it fails on is the lack of a “compatible” CPU.
    Despite my laptop running Windows 11 via the insider program, with no problems, I keep on getting warnings that I will have to do a clean install of Windows 10 to receive updates.

    1. Jumpman said on October 11, 2021 at 4:04 pm
      Reply

      Because that’s what most people don’t have.

      1. Daniel said on October 12, 2021 at 11:25 am
        Reply

        Not really bro. Most people probably have 7th gen processors, and that’s I believe is the main hitch.

      2. Eric said on October 12, 2021 at 3:43 pm
        Reply

        You can bypass the CPU requirements with a simple registry change. I was able to do it and it works.

        https://www.theverge.com/22715331/how-to-install-windows-11-unsupported-cpu-intel-amd-registry-regedit

    2. Question said on October 11, 2021 at 4:27 pm
      Reply

      @Albert Piscene
      Unlike not having TMP, secure boot and having insuficient ram, I don’t believe that having an unsupported cpu will interrupt the actual install process, at least it hasn’t with my installs on unsupported cpus. I’ve installed Windows 11 on an ancient core2duo without issues. Updated fine also.

      1. Erdinch said on October 12, 2021 at 9:13 am
        Reply

        Will I be able to receive updates from MS if I install Win 11 in an unsupported PC?

      2. Daniel said on October 12, 2021 at 11:27 am
        Reply

        How’s that possible, cause my pc meets all requirements except 8th gen cpu and above, i have the 7th gen, but i still got blocked from instaling

  2. Anonymous said on October 11, 2021 at 11:55 am
    Reply

    Me too all spec is fully filled like Ram,disk Storage,TPM,secure Boot only cpu that on red sign

  3. Bye said on October 11, 2021 at 12:10 pm
    Reply

    Looks like gHacks is very much against security as only suspicious hacks against Windows11 security are posted last days.

    Rufus itself is also dangerous and this article shows that again. Highly not recommend.
    Use Microsoft’s official tool only: MCT

    1. Yuliya said on October 11, 2021 at 1:30 pm
      Reply

      TPM and SecureBoot do not provide any security. They are restrictive measures, they restrict the user from executing code whuch microsoft and who knows what other corpos deem as not “safe”. Could be anything from foss to cracked software, which you as the user and owner of that device should be able to run if you decide to do so.
      Rufus is open source. Can you point exactly to aforementioned dangers it exposes a machine to?

      1. Anonymous said on October 11, 2021 at 5:46 pm
        Reply

        I think Windows uses TPM for things like Windows Hello and Bitlocker features among some other things, which are “security” features.
        On the other hand, I don’t think I ever met anyone using these features ever. Not to say that they can’t be useful to some people but I feel like majority of people running Windows at home have no use for these things.

    2. Jumpman said on October 11, 2021 at 4:07 pm
      Reply

      Yeah right. TPM is not about security, it never was. It’s about piracy, that’s why Microsoft is so determined to shove it into everyone computers. Of course they will never admit that, claiming it’s for “security” is much more marketable but it’s all about protecting their software and nothing more. Future versions of Office and other software will use TPM with the product activation to make them harder to pirate.

    3. ULBoom said on October 11, 2021 at 4:50 pm
      Reply

      Bye.

    4. Alan said on October 11, 2021 at 9:15 pm
      Reply

      Bye you sound like one of those paid off shills working for Microsoft. Did Microsoft put you up to this? By the way TPM is stupid and intrusive. It’s also a violation of the users privacy too. I refuse to use dumb useless junk that spies on me or limits my choices.

    5. Anonymous said on October 11, 2021 at 9:41 pm
      Reply

      “Looks like gHacks is very much against security as only suspicious hacks against Windows11 security are posted last days.”

      Microsoft having full access to the world’s files, contacts, LAN passwords, spying on business across the internet, monitoring our purchases does not constitute security, it is the opposite of security, it is a crime against the entire world by a US-based corporate monopoly with biased business and political interests.

      The only thing that’s shocking about all this is that Microsoft (and Google) have not yet been put on trial for espionage and cybercrime.

    6. Corky said on October 11, 2021 at 11:29 pm
      Reply

      @Bye: If you think TPM is only about security then i suggest you do some research into what TCPA’s original intentions for TPM were.

      https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/can-you-trust.en.html

      Personally i believe the user should decide what software is run on their hardware. Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trusted_Computing#Criticism

    7. Anonymous said on October 13, 2021 at 5:28 am
      Reply

      Nice try, Microsoft fanboi or employee.

  4. Karl Zimmer said on October 11, 2021 at 2:28 pm
    Reply

    I plan to try this on a test system to learn how to navigate through Windows 11 and how to use it.
    Then I can plan ahead to purchase a laptop with Windows 11 on it or get one with 10 on it and upgrade to 11.
    Then upgrade my desktop system board so it will run Windows 11.

  5. NPC#21275 said on October 11, 2021 at 3:38 pm
    Reply

    TPM is NOT for security, it was originally designed for corporations to link a user to a machine and limit his access. How many times this needs to be repeated?

    Windows Vista was pretty much boycotted for this requirement and for good reason, now with people being trolls like below and/or dum**sses we care less.

    Watch “Trusted Computing? Yes or No” from 2006, it’s basically the same problem happening all over again.

  6. Question said on October 11, 2021 at 4:00 pm
    Reply

    First time I’ve seen that Windows 11 requires 8gb of ram.
    I thought the minimum was 4gb ram 64gb storage.

    1. Answer said on October 11, 2021 at 9:28 pm
      Reply

      Question, you thought correctly, 4Gb Ram at a minimum.
      Rufus is a beta, so expect a typo correction on final RC

  7. ULBoom said on October 11, 2021 at 5:08 pm
    Reply

    Where did HDR go? The first “Yeah, we don’t need that…” requirement to bite the dust.

    “Tech’s” gone from not caring about customers to not caring about products; credibility’s definitely not a requirement! Win 11 is so hosed, lame beyond belief.

    All this so called security stuff and MS is still OK with users, mostly business users, on ancient perfectly functional and still supported versions of Win 10. Whatever.

  8. scott goodwin said on October 11, 2021 at 6:32 pm
    Reply

    DO WHAT I DO WAIT TILL ALL THIS STUFF IS FOUGHT OUT FOR ABOUT A YEAR THEN TRY WIN 11 WHEN m.s DECIDES THEY CANT FOOL EVERYBODY AND GIVES IN AND MAKES IT ALL NORMAL!!!! THATS WHY ITS FREE REMEMBER? EVERYTHING YOU DO IS BEING WATCHED!!!!!!

    1. Multiple Sklerosis said on October 11, 2021 at 8:25 pm
      Reply

      Hysterical that you calmed down to write “m.s”.

    2. Minion Mike said on October 12, 2021 at 3:29 am
      Reply

      Your Caps Lock key got stuck.

  9. Zachary Binx said on October 11, 2021 at 7:24 pm
    Reply

    You don’t have to do any of this lol I legit just made a bootable USB from the media creation tool for windows 11 after upgrading my personal machine. And I have installed this on 20+ machines by just booting into the drive. You don’t need to do anything special for it.

    1. Rajat said on October 13, 2021 at 2:50 am
      Reply

      Do you get updates?

  10. Doofus said on October 11, 2021 at 8:23 pm
    Reply

    Worked like a charm. Clean install with local account on a Fujitsu laptop from 2007 with none of the required things. None of them. Zero. All drivers found instantly by the system and everything is working.

    1. Doofus said on October 12, 2021 at 4:19 pm
      Reply

      Steps:
      64-Bit ISO from here https://tb.rg-adguard.net/public.php
      Used Rufus Beta, MBR, Extended Windows 11 Installation (no TPM, no Secure Boot, 8GB- RAM) Oh, and by the way: this old laptop has TWO GB of RAM. TWO. DOS. TVÅ. KAKSI. ZWEI. While installing, I add 2 more afterwards, it’s a little quirk with S7210 =) it refuses any install with 4GB but accepts it afterwards. Go figure.. oh well, moving on:
      Clean install on a wiped and formatted drive, computer previously ran W10 21H2 with local account also.
      When the install reaches “connect to wifi”, press shift+F10, in command prompt write taskmgr and kill network flow blaa blaa whatever it is english. Then you can insert name and password, with no internet or microsoft involved, making your install roughly three hundred billion times better.
      In my case the install completed without a hitch and all is well. For now. Today is the first patch tuesday so I will be bamboozled if nothing explodes.
      But yeah, W11 installed on an almost 15 year old potato with 2GB RAM and none of the required important bits.
      Redmond are lying to us.

      1. Doofus said on October 12, 2021 at 8:45 pm
        Reply

        Update:
        Patch tuesday and a cumulative update later all is well in old-potatoland. Zero issues or hickups.
        The update was a lot quicker than Windows 10 on this machine, I guess that’s something.. Other than that, the performance is very similar. I do have to point out that Windows 11 looks and feels very half-baked, UI consistencylevel ZERO. Zorin OS 16 does the exact same thing in style and with a system that is both snappy, safe and a joy to use..maybe it’s because Zorin has 80% less settings and they are all easily found in the same place.. So yeah, this is an experiment with Windows 11. A very dumb experiment, let’s face it: Windows 11 is complete and total garbage compared to Zorin OS. And that’s just the most easy user friendly linux distro I threw out there.. I wasn’t a linux fanboy before, then Windows 8, 10 and now 11 came along..I have to ask myself why..why does a grown, mentally stable man DO these things to himself. A computer should be easy and fun to use, not cause grey hairs and drive people to early graves. But hey, at least my kitchen stays warm when the fan in the laptop is blowing out hot air like there’s no tomorrow. So that’s a bonus too. Good job Redmond!

  11. Anonymous said on October 11, 2021 at 8:29 pm
    Reply

    Better off sticking with Windows 10. Windows 11 is not worth the headache.

    1. Jjjjjjjj said on October 12, 2021 at 9:19 am
      Reply

      Really but why.

  12. Gene said on October 11, 2021 at 11:34 pm
    Reply

    I tried this. It still blocked me from installing Windows 11 due to non-compliant hardware and even though it indicated during the making of the usb stick that it was removing the Windows 11 restrictions for installation. Good thing I have another trick that will work. Seems many tricks that claim to work wind up failing in the end although I suppose not all of them.

    1. Jumpman said on October 12, 2021 at 6:24 am
      Reply

      As I recall you have to disable your network during installation or it will check for updates and “fix” the changes that Rufus made.

    2. Mike said on October 13, 2021 at 5:33 am
      Reply

      It’s calling to the baseship sir, we are talking about MS here.
      Don’t connect to the internet during installation.

  13. Jack said on October 11, 2021 at 11:42 pm
    Reply

    If you use the Rufus tool to create a bootable windows 11 that bypasses the TPM and secure boot requirements will your windows 11 install get Microsoft updates??

  14. Quantumpatic said on October 12, 2021 at 8:10 am
    Reply

    This article wroten 23 hours ago but last Rufus 3.16 beta 2 doesnt contains disable TPM or other function. Checked 23 seconds ago.

    1. Martin Brinkmann said on October 12, 2021 at 9:24 am
      Reply

      Can you check if “check for updates” is enabled? If it is turned off, the option may not be displayed.

      1. Quantumsec said on October 12, 2021 at 12:05 pm
        Reply

        There is no check for updates settings enable and show application settings not working and missing image option settings on Rufus main panel between boot selection and Partition scheme.

  15. Jjjjjjjj said on October 12, 2021 at 9:17 am
    Reply

    I have old PC like year of 2008 dc 7900 HP ultra mini desktop With 2 gb ram installed win 10 running smoothly with some setup trick and some win 10. I don’t know how will be reacted on win 11. Why every one wants to shift win11 is something extraordinary on win11 even they given some years to be furnished win 10. But I want to TPM installation.
    ..

  16. Jjjjjjjj said on October 12, 2021 at 9:20 am
    Reply

    Why.

    1. EP said on October 12, 2021 at 6:30 pm
      Reply

      @Jjjjjjjj – figure it out yourself why

      UI in Win11 is not great
      Win11 is “incomplete” as written here:
      https://www.thurrott.com/windows/windows-11/257678/windows-11-review-fresh-familiar-incomplete

  17. Fernando Moura said on October 12, 2021 at 1:45 pm
    Reply

    I have 1 Toshiba Tecra S11-11G, I’ve tried it in several ways and even with RUFUS it doesn’t disable the TPM, Secure Boot and RAM requirements for Windows 11, it simply doesn’t install.

  18. piomiq said on October 12, 2021 at 3:23 pm
    Reply

    And TPP in Intel platforms isn’t some kind of replacement of TPM?

  19. JohnIL said on October 12, 2021 at 4:23 pm
    Reply

    Not sure its worth it bypassing TPM and Secure Boot along with unsupported hardware just to run Windows 11. So far I have not read any conclusive reasons performance wise to upgrade on a unsupported device. You also risk hardware makers not providing driver updates as well and who knows what Microsoft will do with security updates? I think Microsoft made a major blunder not officially supporting older hardware regardless of their TPM or Secure Boot status is. Maybe Microsoft didn’t want another Vista mess? Most PC’s in last 5 years or more have Secure Boot and some have 1.2 TPM which is better than nothing. Just seems like we will see a whole bunch of unsupported devices running Windows 11 anyway with sketchy support. How is that better Microsoft??

  20. Anonymous said on October 12, 2021 at 5:07 pm
    Reply

    What a commotion.!!!
    Next laptop I buy I will clean up, deinstall W11 and go back to Windows-7
    So much for all this BS. My slogan is: FUMS.
    Jan

  21. Kindkiwi said on October 12, 2021 at 8:21 pm
    Reply

    Although i haven’t used the Rufus tool to install windows 11 on a 9 year old gaming laptop ,i tried everything but only one way worked,take the windows 10 installer and use that to fool windows 11 into thinking its windows 10 during install.That method is extreme but worked.

    However i am going to wait to see if Microsoft supports updates to win,11,if it doesn’t i have a back up image to revert back to windows 10, acronis true image

  22. Cristina said on October 13, 2021 at 12:23 am
    Reply

    Thank you for posting the guide and thank you rufus developers.
    It worked without any issue to make the the bootable iso on anUSB32giga stick, to boot it on my old laptop Lenovo Yoga 13 Ideapad which haven’t meet any of the requirements except the 8 RAM.
    I had Windows 10 very sluggish and I wiped up the whole disk and clean install Windows 11 with the bootable iso. The old machine looks brilliant snappy NEW (touch display, low ram use, speed of the machine, not so much heat on the bottom) all the drivers were installed and also all the updated yesterday(monday) and today (tuesday) were performed.
    Nothing but CLAP CLAP … I am impressed!!!

  23. Cristina said on October 13, 2021 at 12:24 am
    Reply

    Thank you for posting the guide and thank you rufus developers.
    It worked without any issue to make the the bootable iso on anUSB32giga stick, to boot it on my old laptop Lenovo Yoga 13 Ideapad which haven’t meet any of the requirements except the 8 RAM.
    I had Windows 10 very sluggish and I wiped up the whole disk and clean install Windows 11 with the bootable iso. The old machine looks brilliant snappy NEW (touch display, low ram use, speed of the machine, not so much heat on the bottom) all the drivers were installed and also all the updated yesterday(monday) and today (tuesday) were performed.
    Nothing but CLAP CLAP … I am impressed!!!

  24. Rufus 3.16 out of beta said on October 14, 2021 at 2:13 pm
    Reply

    out of beta
    rufus-3.16.exe 2021-10-13 12:31 1.1M Rufus 3.16
    rufus-3.16p.exe 2021-10-13 12:31 1.1M Rufus 3.16 (Portable Version)

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