Microsoft Windows Security Updates June 2020 overview - gHacks Tech News

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Microsoft Windows Security Updates June 2020 overview

Welcome to the overview of Microsoft's June 2020 security patch day. Microsoft releases security updates for all its products on the second Tuesday of the month. This overview provides you with detailed information on the released patches.

It includes links to the security patches as well as an Excel spreadsheet that lists all released security updates. You find direct download links of the latest cumulative updates for supported versions of Windows, the list of known issues, and other information that are useful when it comes to the released patches.

If you have missed out last month's Patch Day overview, check it out here.

Microsoft Windows Security Updates June 2020

windows security update june 2020

Download the linked Excel spreadsheet to your local system: it contains a list of released security updates that Microsoft released on the June 2020 Patch Day. Click on the following link to download the file to your system: microsoft-windows-security-updates-june-2020

Executive Summary

  • Microsoft released security updates for all supported versions of Windows (client and server).
  • Security updates are also available for Microsoft Edge (classic and Chromium), Internet Explorer, Microsoft Office, Windows Defender, Visual Studio, Microsoft Apps for Android, Windows App Store, System Center, and other Microsoft products.
  • The following Windows products have known issues: Windows 10 version 1607, 1809, 1903, and 1909, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2016, Windows Server 2019, Windows Server version 1903 and 1909.

Operating System Distribution

  • Windows 7  (extended support only): 30 vulnerabilities: 3 critical and 27 important
  • Windows 8.1: 37 vulnerabilities: 3 rated critical and 34 rated important
    • same critical vulnerabilities as Windows 7
  • Windows 10 version 1803: 78 vulnerabilities: 4 critical and 74 important
  • Windows 10 version 1809: 82 vulnerabilities: 4 critical and 78 important
    • same critical vulnerabilities as Windows 10 version 1803
  • Windows 10 version 1903: 91 vulnerabilities: 5 critical and 73 important
    • same as Windows 10 version 1803 plus
    • CVE-2020-1248 | GDI+ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
  • Windows 10 version 1909: 
    • same as Windows 10 version 1903
  • Windows 10 version 2004:

Windows Server products

  • Windows Server 2008 R2 (extended support only): 30 vulnerabilities: 3 critical and 27 important
  • Windows Server 2012 R2: 37 vulnerabilities: 3 critical and 34 important.
    • same as Windows Server 2008 R2
  • Windows Server 2016: 60 vulnerabilities: 3 critical and 57 important.
    • same as Windows Server 2008 R2
  • Windows Server 2019: 81 vulnerabilities: 4 critical and 77 are important

Other Microsoft Products

  • Internet Explorer 11: 7 vulnerability: 3 critical, 4 important
  • Microsoft Edge:  4 vulnerabilities: 2 critical, 2 important
  • Microsoft Edge on Chromium:
    • see here (latest security patches from the Chromium project)

Windows Security Updates

Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2

Fixes and improvements

  • Fixed an issue that prevented users from updating .msi files from a network folder. (Monthly Rollup only)
  • Security Updates.

Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2008 R2

Fixes and improvements

  • Fixed an issue that prevented users from updating .msi files from a network folder. (Monthly Rollup only)
  • Security Updates.

Windows 10 version 1803

Fixes and improvements

  • Fixed an issue that prevented users from updating .msi files from a network folder.
  • Security updates

Windows 10 version 1809

Fixes and improvements

  • Fixed an issue that prevented users from updating .msi files from a network folder.
  • Fixed an issue that caused the promotion of a server to a domain controller to fail.
  • Security updates.

Windows 10 version 1903 and 1909

Fixes and improvements

  • Fixed an issue that prevented users from updating .msi files from a network folder.
  • Security updates

Windows 10 version 2004

Fixes and improvements

  • Fixed an issue that prevented users from updating .msi files from a network folder.
  • Fixed an issue that prevented users from using voice commands in Windows Mixed Reality if the display language was set to English (Canada) or English (Australia).
  • Improved the reliability of voice assistants that use Windows voice activation for keywords.
  • Improved the reliability of Cortana's voice activation on devices that support low-power keywords.
  • Security updates

Other security updates

KB4561603 -- Cumulative security update for Internet Explorer: June 9, 2020

KB4561600 -- 2020-06 Security Update for Adobe Flash Player for Windows Server, version 2004 and Windows 10 Version 2004

KB4561612 -- 2020-06 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012

KB4561645 -- 2020-06 Security Only Quality Update for Windows Server 2008

KB4561670 -- 2020-06 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows Server 2008

KB4561674 -- 2020-06 Security Only Quality Update for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012

KB4557957 -- 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows Server, version 2004 and Windows 10 Version 2004

KB4561602 -- 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1709

KB4561605 -- 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1703

KB4561616 -- 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows Server 2016 and Windows 10 Version 1607

KB4561649 -- 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1507

Servicing Stack Updates

KB4560366 -- 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Server, version 2004 and Windows 10 Version 2004

KB4560959 -- 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Server, version 1909, Windows 10 Version 1909, Windows Server 2019 (1903), and Windows 10 Version 1903

KB4562030 -- 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, and Windows Server 2008 R2

KB4562031 -- 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Server 2008

KB4562249 -- 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows 10 Version 1507

KB4562561 -- 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Server 2016 and Windows 10 Version 1607

KB4562250 -- 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows 10 Version 1703

KB4562560 -- 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows 10 Version 1709

KB4562251 -- 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows 10 Version 1803

KB4562562 -- 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Server 2019 and Windows 10 Version 1809

KB4562252 -- 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012

KB4562253 -- 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows 8.1, Windows RT 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2

Known Issues

Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2

  • Error "Failure to Configure Windows Updates. Reverting Changes. Do not Turn off your computer. "may be displayed.
    • Expected behavior if the update is installed on non-ESU joined devices.

Windows 10 version 1809

  • Devices with some Asian language packs installed may display the error "0x800f0982 - PSFX_E_MATCHING_COMPONENT_NOT_FOUND".
    • Workaround 1: uninstall and install recently added language packs. Select check for updates.
    • Workaround 2: Reset the PC.

Windows 10 version 1903 and 1909

  • Internet connectivity may not be available after installing the update on devices with wireless wide area network LTE modems. The Network Connectivity Status Indicator may still show that the device is connected to the Internet.
    • Microsoft is working on a resolution.

Security advisories and updates

ADV200009 | Windows DNS Server Denial of Service Vulnerability

ADV200010 | June 2020 Adobe Flash Security Update

Non-security related updates

Microsoft Office Updates

You find Office update information here.

How to download and install the June 2020 security updates

Microsoft releases security updates for Windows via Windows Updates and other update management services such as WSUS. Administrators may download updates directly as well to install them manually.

It is advised to back up the system before updates are applied.

If you don't want to wait, do the following to run an update check on Windows.

Do the following to check for new updates:

  1. Open the Start Menu of the Windows operating system, type Windows Update and select the result.
  2. Select check for updates in the application that opens. Updates may be installed automatically when they are found or offered by Windows; this depends on the operating system and version that is used, and update settings.

Direct update downloads

Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2

  • KB4561643 -- 2020-06 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7
  • KB4561669 -- 2020-06 Security Only Quality Update for Windows 7

Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2

  • KB4561666 -- 2020-06 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 8.1
  • KB4561673 -- 2020-06 Security Only Quality Update for Windows 8.1

Windows 10 (version 1803)

  • KB4561621 -- 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1803

Windows 10 (version 1809)

  • KB4561608 -- 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1809

Windows 10 (version 1903)

  • KB4560960 -- 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1903

Windows 10 (version 1909)

  • KB4560960 -- 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1909

Windows 10 (version 2004)

  • KB4557957 -- 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 2004

Additional resources

Summary
Article Name
Microsoft Windows Security Updates June 2020 overview
Description
Microsoft's June 2020 Patch Day; Microsoft released security updates and non-security updates for all supported versions of Windows -- both client and server versions -- on June 9, 2020.
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Comments

  1. Paul(us) said on June 9, 2020 at 9:08 pm
    Reply

    Thanks, Martin, For explaining and guiding my update from my Windows 10 pro. o.s. to version 1909 Build 18363.90

  2. Jim Vanderbilt said on June 9, 2020 at 11:08 pm
    Reply

    Very useful, thanks !

  3. Yuliya said on June 10, 2020 at 2:15 am
    Reply

    All well on LTSC 1809.

  4. Brian K. said on June 10, 2020 at 3:22 am
    Reply

    Surprised to see the biggest security threat to users’ privacy still hasn’t been patched, that being the extensive unstoppable telemetry and vast data collection by Microsoft corporation from Windows users, on full-level by default, dwarfing anything from Google or Facebook, who’s products you can choose not to use if you don’t want to, unlike Microsoft’s that came pre-installed with the computer.

    Where is the outrage over microsoft’s telemetry practices?

    But we raise all hell when we think china might have done a fraction of this in Huawei devices or Deepin Linux?

    1. Iron Heart said on June 10, 2020 at 6:39 am
      Reply

      @Brian K.

      Well, you can install Linux without having started up Windows at all, if you are already prepared, so you are not really “forced to use it”, unless you have software that only runs on Windows.

      And I think that it will never be fixed since Microsoft distributed Windows 10 for free in exchange for your data, the whole Windows as a Service thing.

      1. Rob.G said on June 10, 2020 at 12:28 pm
        Reply

        “Well, you can install Linux without having started up Windows at all”.

        I’ve fallen for that line before. I’ve tried installing various versions of Linux on my top-end HP laptop..only to find that every version I tried made the CPU fan run non stop, and the CPU percentage to run around 65%, even on idle – yet the laptop runs fine in this respect on Windows, ticking over at 1% cpu on idle, and hardly ever hearing the fan come on.

        I spent a week trying to solve this major issue with Linux via the various forums, and what I discovered was that its a very very common problem with laptop users..and there doesn’t seem to be a fix. Very complicated command-line fixes are often suggested on the Linux forums, and some of the threads are eventually marked as ‘solved’ (for some reason)… but still many people post saying its a common problem and they cannot run Linux on their laptop.

        So please, when recommending Linux to Windows users, please mention this issue; ..AND the fact that its very common for Linux to mess up the boot sector when dual booting Linux with Windows…and often quite difficult to recover from.

        “Linux / mint fan runs constantly on laptop high cpu”
        Quote…
        “I’m sorry to say.. I had to uninstall Mint because I encountered the same problem: fan running quite often, but without “good” reasons”,
        .
        https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?t=285730
        .
        “Ubuntu messed up my Windows 10 boot”
        .
        https://askubuntu.com/questions/785347/ubuntu-messed-up-my-windows-10-boot

      2. Iron Heart said on June 10, 2020 at 1:04 pm
        Reply

        @Rob.G

        Well, that’s unfortunate. I haven’t played around with Linux enough to claim any kind of expertise in that field, I just know that it should(!) be possible to install Linux without having booted up Windows. But yeah, I’ve also heard that it can mess up boot partitions, and does so quite frequently.

        As for myself, I am a Mac user and I also have a PC running Windows 8.1 + Classic Shell. I know that I will probably get some flak for saying that, but I think macOS is a pretty nice middle ground. None of the problems of Windows, while also having a decent selection of software. I really think more people should use it. I’ll now seek shelter for having claimed that macOS is any good. ;-)

      3. Rob.G said on June 10, 2020 at 1:23 pm
        Reply

        “….I’ll now seek shelter for having claimed that macOS is any good”.

        Ha, yes…run and hide Mac-boy! Seriously though, Macs are well made and popular (in the higher circles you obviously move in;-) I’d probably buy one myself if it wasnt for the price-tag. Even a second hand Mac-laptop will set you back around £800 here in the UK. I could buy a new HP gaming laptop for that price, and still have enough left over to buy an expensive set of headphones.

        I’m with you on the Windows 8.1 + Classic Shell combination. I think W8 is underrated these days. (Never thought I’d ever say that).

    2. Carroll said on June 10, 2020 at 1:12 pm
      Reply

      I want to use Windows but my use of it is my business, I don’t want my private usage or data sent to Microsoft.

      1. Rob.G said on June 10, 2020 at 2:56 pm
        Reply

        “…I don’t want my private usage or data sent to Microsoft”.

        I’m the same. That’s why I still use Windows 7. I run Brave browser sandboxed using Sandboxie (the full version is now free). I’ve never updated W7 in the past year..and..touch wood..Ive never had an issue. Plus the Sandbox helps guard against Ransomware.

        As Iron Heart said: There’s always Apple Mac, Linux (ahem!), or Windows 8.1 + Classic Shell combination, assuming you can find a machine running W8. (no issues there with , or with Windows 7, regarding private data sent to Microsoft).

      2. Iron Heart said on June 10, 2020 at 5:06 pm
        Reply

        @Carroll and Rob.G

        In terms of privacy, I think this is a fairly accurate ranking:

        Most Linux distros > outdated Windows versions (like XP / Vista) > Windows 7 / 8.1 = macOS >>> Windows 10.

        So let’s say that Linux is not an option because of various obstacles, or missing software, and if we put aside older Windows versions for security reasons and because newer hardware doesn’t support them, then I think Windows 7 / 8.1 and macOS are the “better” options still in terms of privacy. If you read up on the many things Windows 10 collects, you will find that older versions of Windows or macOS are indeed kindergarten level compared to that. Windows 10 is collecting the most data out of any OS in existence and it’s not close.

        That being said, one can improve the situation somewhat with tools like StutUp10, which is just but one of range of tools that try to silence Windows 10:

        https://www.oo-software.com/shutup10

        @Rob.G in particular, you mentioned that Windows 7 / 8.1 are not problematic, this is not entirely correct. Many people are unaware of the fact that Microsoft has backported some of Windows 10’s telemetry and has rolled it out to Windows 7 / 8.1 via Windows Update:

        https://www.theregister.com/2015/09/01/microsoft_backports_data_slurp_to_windows_78_via_patches/

        https://gist.github.com/xvitaly/eafa75ed2cb79b3bd4e9

        But then again, they didn’t port all or even the majority of Windows 10’s telemetry back to Windows 7 / 8.1, both Win 7 / 8.1 are still kindergarten level compared to Windows 10 in terms of data collection. Plus, the related updates can be uninstalled.

        Sad to see that many people are running the worst possible combination, which is Windows 10 + browsers like Chrome or Edge – this indicates a lack of interest in privacy, and gives the companies behind these products a reason to continue with or even expand on their privacy violations, much to the detriment of people who still care. I totally understand why some people can’t get around Windows in some cases (avoiding Chrome / Edge is easier, though), but one should at least try to improve privacy inside of the OS one has to use.

      3. Iron Heart said on June 10, 2020 at 5:13 pm
        Reply

        *ShutUp10, seems like it’s typo day today.

    3. JerryO said on June 10, 2020 at 11:51 pm
      Reply

      Getting really tired of people telling me to use Linux the moment I mention the excessive level of telemetry embedded in Windows.

  5. Carnation said on June 10, 2020 at 5:52 am
    Reply

    Sorry for unrelated note but, what’s happening with 2004? Are they delaying that until the “issues” has been fixed?

    1. Martin Brinkmann said on June 10, 2020 at 6:29 am
      Reply

      No, they just block the rollout for affected machines.

      1. ilev said on June 10, 2020 at 7:42 am
        Reply

        Martin,

        If Microsoft knows which PCs are affected why can’t Microsoft display 2004 incompatibility cause to the users?

      2. Martin Brinkmann said on June 10, 2020 at 7:43 am
        Reply

        Good question, I don’t know.

      3. The Equestrian said on June 10, 2020 at 10:25 am
        Reply

        Because they’re Microsoft where the motto is “Let’s strive together to make sure nothing makes any sense whatsoever!”

  6. TimH said on June 10, 2020 at 4:25 pm
    Reply

    The Adobe update for 8.1 is 21MB. That’s amazingly large…

  7. M Davison said on June 10, 2020 at 5:59 pm
    Reply

    It is perfectly legitimate for the contributor above to suggest (s)he doesn’t want to be spied on by microsoft or anyone.
    When we buy products we are not agreeing to be spied upon – regardless of oceans of small print with make it legal, it is still not moral.

  8. W10hater said on June 11, 2020 at 12:15 pm
    Reply

    Windows 10 is a joke.
    Good luck having a stable machine during these times when a lot of people are working from home or your job is dependent on a Windows machine.

    1. Kent Brockman said on June 11, 2020 at 10:43 pm
      Reply

      Hate fogs the brain cells. Millions of people are fine with W10, since it works well enough for them. My anecdotal experience( worth at least as much as yours) with a handful of systems is it performs adequately, no “luck” involved.

  9. Agostino said on June 11, 2020 at 2:18 pm
    Reply

    Hello,

    I had problems after updating KB4561600: impossible to open PDF files!!!
    I was able to open files with other app (Adobe Touch) but not with Adobe Acrobat Reader DC.
    After removing this update and installing again Adobe Acrobat Reader DC everything works!
    Does anyone had the same experience?
    Thanks in advance!

  10. ramsam said on June 13, 2020 at 8:40 am
    Reply

    June update took 1hr to download and 8hrs to install. After 8 hrs, there was one change. The desktop background color changed. Otherwise, all were same.

    I will change background in 8 secs and 8hrs not required for this

  11. Oops said on June 14, 2020 at 12:35 pm
    Reply

    Er, sorry to be picky, but is this a typo, or have you forgotten something?

    Windows 7 (extended support only): 30 vulnerabilities: 3 critical and 27 important

    Windows 8.1: 37 vulnerabilities: 3 rated critical and 34 rated important
    > same critical vulnerabilities as Windows 7

    Windows 7: *30* vulnerabilities
    Windows 8.1: *37* vulnerabilities

    By my reckoning, the above indicates that seven vulnerabilities are missing from the Windows 8.1 listing! Not that the Windows 7 listing managed to show all “30 vulnerabilities”! Have I missed something?

    1. Martin Brinkmann said on June 14, 2020 at 2:14 pm
      Reply

      We only link to the critical vulnerabilities.

  12. Oops said on June 14, 2020 at 1:33 pm
    Reply

    Oops, forgot to mention the ‘obvious’.

    Thank you for an otherwise helpful article and the commenting option; all are most helpful.

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