Wine 3.0 with Direct3D 10 and 11 support - gHacks Tech News

Wine 3.0 with Direct3D 10 and 11 support

Wine HQ announced the release of Wine 3.0 today. The new version of Wine comes with support for Direct3D 10 and 11, improved DirectWrite and Direct2D support, and more features.

Wine enables users on Linux, Mac OS X and other non-Windows systems to run Windows programs without requiring a copy of Microsoft Windows.

It is, for instance, useful to get Windows software to run on Linux machines that would not be available otherwise. Think of computer games, Adobe Photoshop or other programs that are not available for Linux.

The Wine community maintains a database of the compatibility of games and programs. You can check out the database here to find out if a program or game that you want to run is compatible.

The Wine 3.0 source code is already available. Binary releases are built right now and will be published once that is done.

Wine 3.0

wine 3.0 install

The developers note that Wine 3.0 features over 6000 changes over the previous release. Open the release notes for a list of important changes that went into the new release.

Here is a short list of important changes:

  • Default Windows version set to Windows 7.
  • Support for a signficant number of Direct3D 10 and 11 features including compute shaders, stream output, structured buffers and more.
  • Improved support for OpenGL core contexts in Direct3D.
  • Support for more Direct3D graphics cards.
  • OpenGL extension list updated to OpenGL 4.6.
  • Wine can be built as an APK package and behaves like an Android app.
  • Full graphic and audio driver for Android.
  • Async I/O performance improvements.
  • Mouse cursors redesigned and support high DPI screens.
  • Shell Explorer, common dialogs and RichEdit control scale properly on high DPI screens.
  • Higher display resolution support in desktop mode.
  • AES encryption supported.

You can run wine --version to find out which version of Wine is installed on the system. Installation and upgrade instructions are provided on the official website.

Now You: Which Windows-only programs or games would you need on Linux?

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Wine 3.0 with Direct3D 10 and 11 support
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Wine 3.0 with Direct3D 10 and 11 support
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Wine HQ announced the release of Wine 3.0 today. The new version of Wine comes with support for Direct3D 10 and 11, improved DirectWrite and Direct2D support, and more features.
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    Comments

    1. Jody Thornton said on January 18, 2018 at 11:27 pm
      Reply

      Some older audio titles I would love to see run:

      GoldWave v4.26 (I think it works now)
      ZaraRadio Free Edition
      Raduga v3.8
      dbAudioWare Processing directX Plugins (v4 or v5)

      Then I’d be all good

    2. dark said on January 19, 2018 at 1:01 am
      Reply

      Direct3D 12 support will be with VKD3D.

      Also Photoshop CC 2018 works in Wine. It is rated gold in wine app database.

    3. A different Martin said on January 19, 2018 at 7:26 am
      Reply

      Garmin Express, for updating my Garmin GPS (sat nav), and maybe iTunes for managing my iPod? (I’d be a little nervous about using either from Wine, however, even if they seemed to install and run okay. I wouldn’t want to bork my GPS in particular.) And it would be nice if Guitar Pro 7 worked in Wine 3, since Arobas no longer makes a Linux version and the Windows version crashes in Wine 2. Apart from those three programs, there’s no other Windows/Mac-only program I can think of that I can’t live without or find an acceptable substitute for in Linux. (I’d probably miss Notepad++, Agent Ransack, and IrfanView; one develops habits and affections. I know IrfanView runs in Wine, and I think I’ve read that Notepad++ does, too. I’m not sure about Agent Ransack.)

      1. anon3 said on January 19, 2018 at 3:31 pm
        Reply

        I don’t have an iDevice, but Clementine and Rhythmbox should be able to manage them. As for Guitar Pro, if you can’t install v6 (it is a little tricky, thanks to Arobas), you should try MuseScore or TuxGuitar.

        https://alternativeto.net/ is a neat site. Just search for something and then filter by platform.

        1. A different Martin said on January 19, 2018 at 8:24 pm
          Reply

          Thanks!

          I actually have a license for Guitar Pro 6 as well as for Guitar Pro 7 and I think Arobas made a Linux version of 6 (not that I’ve tried it). TuxGuitar seems to work well, and it seems to have more efficient, less buggy coding than Guitar Pro, but it also has fewer interesting/fun features. My major problem with TuxGuitar is that the fingering dots are medium blue on a medium-dark brown fretboard and I can barely see them! (What were the developers thinking? Are they twenty-year-old tetrachromats with 20/10 vision or something?) I contacted the developers (a pair of Argentinian brothers, I seem to recall) to suggest a color change, but I didn’t get a response. I know nothing about coding, but I even went so far as to look at the source code (in Windows) to see if there was an obvious color code somewhere that I could change, but I ended up throwing up my hands. I don’t think I’d ever heard of MuseScore.

          I’ll keep Clementine and Rhythmbox in mind for my hand-me-down iPod. To be honest, I just loaded the iPod once and have never “managed” it. I just keep it in the car for when the radio starts driving me nuts.

          I’ve visited alternativeto.net before when doing web searches for programs, but I’m going to have try to remember the URL itself for when I switch to Linux for good.

          Again, I really appreciate the tips.

        2. anon3 said on January 19, 2018 at 10:27 pm
          Reply

          You’re welcome!

          Honestly, I haven’t played in a while :D, and it’s been years since I’ve used any tabs, so I can’t give you any personal recommendations, but I’ve seen a few comments on the Guitar Pro blog (https://blog.guitar-pro.com/2017/01/namm-2017-discover-guitar-pro-7-beta-version/) suggesting MuseScore. I guess it should be able to read Guitar Pro files.
          If I was in the mood, I’d give it a try.

    4. Stefan said on January 19, 2018 at 8:30 am
      Reply

      Martin, do we still have to go through tons of settings in Wine as we had to some years ago or has it become more automated ?

      What will the default setting of Windows 7 do to XP software that can’t be run in Windows 7 mode ? Can i make settings for each installed software (i think i did that a few years ago when Wine was unstable ?

      1. A different Martin said on January 19, 2018 at 9:05 am
        Reply

        I think using PlayOnLinux as a front end for Wine is supposed to make setup a lot more straightforward, at least for officially supported apps. But I’m a Linux noob, so someone more knowledgeable should weigh in.

      2. dark said on January 19, 2018 at 1:10 pm
        Reply

        PlayOnLinux and Lutris.

      3. Gerard said on January 19, 2018 at 2:07 pm
        Reply

        Stefan, you don’t have “to go through tons of settings in Wine”. Wine will ask you if you want to install Mono (for .net Windows programs) when you run it for the first time. That’s about it. Wine comes with the winecfg utility for various options you can explore, including a Windows version setting for each installed Windows program. If you want more Wine options, you could get Winetricks (a script) or Vineyard (a collection of tools and libraries). The Winetricks version in your repos may be outdated, so get it directly from its GitHub pages. Vineyard (www.vineyardproject.org) has a PPA (in case you use Ubuntu or one of its derivatives).

      4. anon3 said on January 19, 2018 at 3:34 pm
        Reply

        You can choose the Windows version in winecfg.
        https://wiki.winehq.org/Winecfg#Windows_Version

    5. TelV said on January 19, 2018 at 2:26 pm
      Reply

      Ah, now that’s very good news. I’m still on Windows 8.1 which still has another five years of extended support to run, but thinking about the future I can’t imagine ever installing Windows 10.

      One of the Linux distros springs to mind as an alternative OS, but I always assumed I’d have to give up gaming. But via the link Martin posted it appears that Wine will run all three versions of Crysis (love that game).

      So come crunch day on January 1, 2023 it’ll be bye-bye Windows forever! :)

      1. Jody Thornton said on January 19, 2018 at 3:57 pm
        Reply

        Psst if you use server 2012 updates from R2, it will be November 2023.

        1. TelV said on January 20, 2018 at 2:21 pm
          Reply

          Silly question probably, but will updates for server 2012 R2 work in Windows 8.1 Jody?

        2. Jody Thornton said on January 21, 2018 at 6:22 pm
          Reply

          VERY VERY Likely TelV. Server 2012 patches work on Windows 8, and Server 2008 patches work on Vista. So the precedent that’s been set looks promising.

        3. TelV said on January 22, 2018 at 10:46 pm
          Reply

          OK, thanks for the tip Jody.

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