Vivaldi Web Browser Review

The first stable version of Vivaldi, a new web browser by Vivaldi Technologies, has been released on April 6, 2016 to the public.

The web browser, launched by Opera co-founder John von Tetzchner's new company Vivaldi Technologies back in January 2015, swims against the trend of streamlining modern web browsers by giving users choice, features and customization options.

Vivaldi Web Browser

The first stable version of the Vivaldi browser marks an important milestone for the company and users interested in it, as it moves from beta / release candidate to stable which means that Vivaldi Technologies thinks it is ready for productive use.

To be fair, the browser was already fairly stable in its beta state but the upgrade to stable should give it another boost.

Vivaldi Download

The Vivaldi web browser runs on Windows, Mac and Linux systems. Windows and Linux users may select 32-bit or 64-bit editions of the browser on the download page.

Existing users can run update checks from within Vivaldi by selecting Vivaldi menu > Help > Check for updates, or download the new version directly from the Vivaldi website which will recognize the installed version during setup and update it to the stable version of the browser.

The Interface

vivaldi 1.0 stable browser

Vivaldi's interface is not as restricted as Google Chrome's is. While most Chromium-based browsers share the same interface, interface modifications have been implemented that set the browser apart from most Chrome clones.

Apart from the menu at the top left and the merging of the tab and title bar, Vivaldi's displaying additional tools in the address bar, a side panel that you can show or hide, and a status bar at the bottom of the screen which you can also show or hide.

Some features resemble those of classic Opera, like the zoom and toggle image option in the status bar, or the side panel.

vivaldi site panel

The side panel allows you to display bookmarks, downloads and notes, as well as so called web panels which display any site or service in the sidebar area directly.

Vivaldi ships with a dedicated search field on top of that which the majority of Chromium-based browsers don't support.

You may notice other useful features, like the loading information displayed directly in the address bar that indicates progress, the size of the page and the number of page elements loaded.

The preferences hold several interesting appearance and interface related options. This includes the following options among others.

  • Show or hide the status bar.
  • Show or hide the tab bar, and display it at the top, left or right side, or bottom.
  • Show or hide the address bar, and display it at the top or bottom.
  • Display the panel on the left or right, or hide its toggle.
  • Select a light, dark, or page theme color-based interface color.
  • Set a background color or image.

Major Features

In this review, I'll be looking at features that make Vivaldi stand out from the crowd. While some browsers may support these as well in one form or another, it is safe to say that the majority doesn't.

This means on the other hand that features such as automatic updates, speed dial, tabbed browsing, audio muting, tab pinning or support for HTML5 video sites such as Netflix won't be mentioned here as those are supported by every other browser as well.

Tab Stacks

vivaldi stack tabs

I always liked the idea of stacking tabs to improve visibility in the browser. Unfortunately, no browser up until now added the tab stacking functionality of the classic Opera (well Google did in Chrome, but removed the feature again).

To stack tabs in Vivaldi, drag and drop one on the other. You can stack as many tabs as you like, and toggle between them with a click on the tab.

You will notice that the tab stack takes up the same space as a single tab. On top of that, you get tab tiling options to display all sites and services open in a tab stack at the same time.

Tab Tiling

vivaldi tab tiling

Right-click on any Tab Stack and select "Tile Tab Stack" to display all of its tabs in the same window. The layout displays all tabs side by side all the time if you use the right-click menu.

You can use shortcuts however to change the appearance:

  • Ctrl-F7 tiles all tabs to a grid
  • Ctrl-F8 tiles all tabs horizontally
  • Ctrl-F9 tiles all tabs vertically

Tab Hibernation

hibernate tabs

Tab Hibernation unloads sites but keeps them listed as tabs in the web browser. The main idea behind the feature is to give users options to free up memory used by the browser.

To use the feature, right-click on the active tab and select "hibernate background tabs". This will hibernate all tabs but the active tab.

You may hibernate individual tabs as well by right-clicking on them and selecting "hibernate tab" instead. Please note that the option won't show when you right-click on the active tab.

Note Taking

note taking

The browser ships with built-in note taking functionality. One handy feature of it is the ability to highlight any text on any website, and add it to a note to keep a record of it.

Simply highlight text in the browser, right-click on the selection afterwards, and select "add selection as a note" from the context menu.

You can access previously created notes on the notes web panel.You will notice that Vivaldi adds date, time and the url to the note automatically.

vivaldi notes

Apart from options to create notes from highlighted text, you may also create notes directly using the Web Panel.

The browser adds date and time automatically to each note that you create. You may add a web address to the note, and add screenshot or file attachments on top of that.

Quick Commands

quick commands

Quick Commands are another interesting feature. If you prefer to use the keyboard for most activities, you may like this one a lot.

Hit F2 to display the Quick Commands interface which displays often used activities such as closing the window or launching a new private window.

Type the first couple of letters of what you want to do, and use the keyboard or mouse to select the option.

While it is not faster than using the keyboard shortcut directly, some options don't have hotkeys associated with them.

A side-effect of using Quick Commands is that hotkeys are highlighted so that you can discover them and use them in the future.

Interface scaling

interface zoom

Another interesting feature of the web browser is support for interface scaling. It provides you with options to change the size of interface elements and text in the browser.

You may increase the size for better accessibility, or decrease it to increase the room for website elements.

Tab Sessions

vivaldi-tab-sessions

While you can configure the browser to start where you left of, utilizing its session management this way, you can also save all open tabs as sessions to open them again at a later point in time.

To do so, select Vivaldi menu > File > Save Open Tabs as Session. This stores all open tabs as a separate session which you can load at any time in the future.

Settings

vivaldi settings

Vivaldi ships with a massive list of settings. You can open the Settings window with a tap on Alt-P, or by selecting Vivaldi menu > Tools > Settings.

I have mentioned several settings already in the interface and feature sections above. Below is a small selection of interesting preferences:

  • Tabs: Define how tabs are cycled, and enable or disable tab previews.
  • Keyboard: Learn about keyboard shortcuts, and change shortcuts
  • Mouse: Enable and learn about supported mouse gestures.
  • Webpages: Set default web page zoom level (valid for all sites).
  • Webpages: Set minimum font size.

You may open vivaldi://flags on top of that for access to experimental features.

Vivaldi Extensions

vivaldi extensions

Vivaldi, just like Opera and many other Chromium-based browsers, supports Google Chrome extensions.

In fact, when you open the extensions management screen at vivaldi://extensions, in the browser, the "get more extensions" link leads directly to Google's Chrome Web Store.

The "add to chrome" button there allows you to install the extension directly in Vivaldi. The browser displays the same dialog as Chrome once you hit the add button detailing all permissions that the extension requires to run.

Once you accept it, the extension gets added to Vivaldi so that you can use or benefit from the functionality that it adds to the browser.

Extensions can be removed from the internal extensions page, and just like in Chrome, there is a Developer Mode option that enables you to sideload extensions directly as well.

As far as compatibility with Chrome extensions is concerned, the overwhelming majority of extensions should work fine while some extensions may not work fully or at all (for instance those that leverage Chrome-specific code).

Benchmarks

How does Vivaldi compare to stable versions of Chrome, Firefox, Edge and Opera? We ran a test of benchmarks on all stable versions, and below is the result.

The benchmarks used were HTML5Test, Kraken, Octane and Browsermark. Higher values are better except for Kraken were lower values are better.

HTML5TestKrakenOctaneBrowsermark
Google Chrome5211692190494703
Microsoft Edge4531932217592785
Mozilla Firefox4781763182373852
Opera Browser5201658184704583
Vivaldi Browser5211642 190694655

The future

The first stable version is a milestone but not the end of the road for development. Vivaldi Technologies has big plans for the browser. Jon von Tetzchner had this to say about the future of the browser.

Moving forward we will continue to focus on end user requests. As part of that we will be providing a full mail client. Advanced Internet users continue to use many mail accounts and we feel that there is a significant hole in the market there. But generally we will continue to improve and innovate, based on end user demand and requirements.

User feedback, and the feature-richness of classic Opera are the two driving factors that drive the browser's development.

Major Vivaldi Updates

The following bullet point lists informs you about major Vivaldi updates, and what they added or changed in the browser. Each links to a review of that particular update that you can follow for additional details.

  • Vivaldi 1.1 -- The browser update shipped with many fixes and improvements. It allows you to hibernate tab stacks now, select what happens when you close the active tab, and options to disable suggestions. On the downside, support for Windows XP and Vista was dropped.
  • Vivaldi 1.2 -- Improvements to gestures, which can now be changed and options to create new gestures were added to version 1.2.
  • Vivaldi 1.3 -- The browser version added new theme capabilities, mouse gesture improvements, new privacy settings, and smaller improvements across the board.
  • Vivaldi 1.4 -- This update introduced theme scheduling to the browser. It allows you to schedule themes for certain times of the day. Other features include web panels support for pinning sites to the panels sidebar of the browser.
  • Vivaldi 1.5 -- Delta updates were introduced in this version which reduce the size of updates. Vivaldi also got support for Philipps Hue to change light colors based on the sites you visit.
  • Vivaldi 1.6 -- A smaller update that allows you to rename tab stacks, and select all tabs of the same site easily.

Verdict

Vivaldi is a promising web browser for Internet users who want options when it comes to using a browser. While there is still work to be done, it is in my humble opinion the browser that I'm most excited about.

Summary
Author Rating
4.5 based on 72 votes
Software Name
Vivaldi
Software Category
Browser
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Responses to Vivaldi Web Browser Review

  1. Victor Iryniuk April 6, 2016 at 10:14 am #

    Did anybody try it out yet?
    I'm especially interested in the resource usage, compared to Chrome.

    • Martin Brinkmann April 6, 2016 at 10:42 am #

      Chrome seems to use less RAM than Vivaldi (just a quick glance at the Task Manager, nothing scientific)

      • Nebulus April 6, 2016 at 10:53 am #

        Unfortunately it uses a lot of RAM even at startup with no site opened (200MB across all processes). Compare this with 50MB used by the latest stable Chromium.

        What's worse, it feels like the interface is SLOW. I have no idea why this happens, but both Chromium and Firefox seem to be lightning fast compared to Vivaldi. Let's hope it gets better with time, though :)

      • Martin Brinkmann April 6, 2016 at 10:55 am #

        It is not that bad on one of my systems I tested the browser on. Used 140 MB across all processes with one tab open (startpage). Still more than Google Chrome uses with the same setup.

        I did not notice any slow-downs when using the browser, and never felt that the interface was sluggish or slow (apart from some settings pages which take a moment to load).

      • Nebulus April 6, 2016 at 12:00 pm #

        Well, probably that is the main reason for my impression of Vivaldi being slow; the first page from the interface that I tried opening WAS the settings page :)

  2. Joseph April 6, 2016 at 11:33 am #

    I have add-ons compatible issues, namely Xmarks which crashes when initiating synchronizing and options in Click & Clean not opening.

    • MdN April 6, 2016 at 1:37 pm #

      History Eraser stopped working properly for me, but it's not such a big deal. They'll probably fix it. As for the rest, it's comparable to Opera and Chromium, starts maybe even faster, RAM usage is OK (not as low as Firefox though), pages load properly fast and I like it. I've been using the Beta occasionally along with Firefox, now I can use this even more often. I love how it's the only browser where I can put "close tab" buttons to the left like the rest of my interface.

    • Vidfamne April 25, 2016 at 12:02 pm #

      Anyone found any resolution re Xmarks problem? My Vivaldi crashes several times a day...

  3. yoav April 6, 2016 at 11:46 am #

    Thanks for the review, Martin. It looks very nice and certainly worth a look.

  4. Lestat April 6, 2016 at 12:37 pm #

    So, they finally hit final.

    To the fact that is uses more memory then Chrome: they use the App system to create their UI, which creates an additional process which is eating a bit more memory which is the bad thing. The good thing is that way you get a browser which can use the Chromium engine and is still not dumbed down like most other Chromium based browsers.

    No fan of bundled add-ons/extensions with a browser to create a "feature rich" experience, so why do i use Vivaldi? Because the App which is creating the UI is maintained by that developers and they will not dumb it down and make it more and more feature rich.

    In the end, the good is defeating the bad points in my opinion.

  5. yoav April 6, 2016 at 12:43 pm #

    OK, first impressions:
    1 - The available color schemes are awful, and apparently there is no support for themes at this time, or at least I couldn't figure out how to install themes.
    2 - Tab stacking is amazing. I can't believe I never had this functionality in Firefox.
    3- I didn’t experience any performance lags on my PC (win7)
    4 - RAM usage is 450 MB(!) with one stack (5 tabs) and another 2 open tabs, no addons.

    • mikef90000 April 6, 2016 at 11:50 pm #

      I'm more of a function-over-form guy, but I agree about the ugly default theme. Too many square corners, reminds me of Win10. Hopefully the theming options will improve over time.
      On Linux I've no issues with performance so far. Both Vivaldi and Opera use about 450MB with two tabs, Firefox about 350MB and Palemoon a little lower (no surprise).
      Haven't investigated in detail, but I hope their business plan does not preclude open sourcing at some point.

    • Rick April 7, 2016 at 9:52 pm #

      You've probably found this already, but unchecking "Use Page Theme Color in User Interface" makes a big difference in toning it down. It's the first thing I set.

  6. dan April 6, 2016 at 1:21 pm #

    Martin, Is there a portable version available? I couldn't find one listed on their downloads page.

    • Martin Brinkmann April 6, 2016 at 1:30 pm #

      You can create a standalone installation of Vivaldi when you select advanced during installation. You do need to pick a custom extraction folder as well for this to work.

  7. Henk van Setten April 6, 2016 at 1:57 pm #

    I find Vivaldi is a very promising browser in many respects, I really like it. Right now it's my second browser, but not yet my default one (which is Pale Moon).

    I can confirm other people's impression that it's slow, though. On my desktop PC (all software installed on SSD) when I open a simple webpage link with an empty-cache Vivaldi, it takes a full 3 seconds to start up the browser which then sits there with a blank screen for another 2 seconds before any content appears, so 5 seconds total. In ordinary life, this really feels like a long wait :-)

    In comparison, when doing exactly the same thing (with a link to start the browser and open the same page) with an empty-cache Pale Moon, it took 2,5 seconds in total, which is twice as fast.

    So the Vivaldi developers might do well to make speed improvement one of their priorities.

    • MdN April 6, 2016 at 2:14 pm #

      I don't do that kind of testing, though on my ancient PC with Linux and no SSD in sight Vivaldi fully opens in two seconds after clicking the icon. Same as Firefox (which still loads the start page for a while). Beta 2 was slow, but Beta 3 improved the speed significantly.

  8. Dan82 April 6, 2016 at 2:15 pm #

    Both good and bad news here.
    .
    The philosophy of the developers is very much appreciated. From the very beginning they've said, that this is a browser that not everyone should use the same way, so their uppermost goal has always been to make it configurable just like each single person prefers to use it.
    This comes with some disadvantages, because Vivaldi uses the Blink browser engine not only for the webpage itself, but also for its own browser interface. Of course you'll see a slower start time and a higher memory footprint with limited usage, but that should (not tested, but theoretically) be less of an issue the more intensively you use the browser (read: the overhead will matter less in relation the more tabs are in use).
    This kind of design also has advantages for the user, we (the end-users) just can't see them (yet). Aside from a speedier and cheaper development path, it is possible for each and every one of us to use custom JavaScript and CSS code to rebuild the Vivaldi browser to their own liking. You can even replace some of Vivaldi's own code if you want to, which some unofficial patches already offer right now. That's the potential of this design at least, but you're not getting there easily, since Vivaldi itself doesn't provide any help or support for that feature. I hope the developers will offer true extensibility in form of custom browser behavior and proper themes at some point in the future, but it'll be a while yet until we know their decision on this.
    .
    The bad news? I'm still having some issues that make it impossible for Vivaldi to become my main browser. There's the very annoying focus-stealing behavior of the browser that has popped up lately, or the bug that you cannot refresh a page with submitted POST data, but the lack of any way to handle tabs properly (multi-row, or at least scrollable minimum width tabs) is the most bothersome to me. A number of features also do not have the proper menu options I want (for example, there's no way to choose which tabs to hibernate or which not to). In summary, the browser is intended to use with many different configurations, but many of those we would wish for or we knew from earlier Opera versions simply haven't made it into the final version 1.0 yet.

  9. Idaho April 6, 2016 at 3:14 pm #

    Part of my use of Firefox is my perception of Firefox as being a superior browser in terms of security and privacy. How does Vivaldi stack up in these areas?

    • Jason April 6, 2016 at 5:43 pm #

      As far as I know it is closed source. This is not a good characteristic for security-minded people.

  10. Nobody April 6, 2016 at 3:46 pm #

    Hi Martin,

    i liked the good old Opera very much and was waiting for Vivaldi to come out only to read that it's based on Chromium :-/ Can you tell us something about the Privacy-Settings, is this Chromium-Based browser leaking information to Google by default?

    Thanks and Greetz
    Nobody

    • Martin Brinkmann April 6, 2016 at 4:02 pm #

      You can turn off a couple of things under Privacy in the Settings including Google Phishing and Malware Protection, the reporting of Safe Browsing incidents to google, and reporting of diagnostics.

  11. CHEF-KOCH April 6, 2016 at 4:44 pm #

    Chromium =)

    • Rick April 7, 2016 at 10:16 pm #

      Not sure if that's a facetious smiley, but isn't Chromium out of the box less privacy-averse than Chrome?

  12. Lestat April 6, 2016 at 4:47 pm #

    In the end finally a browser which goes not down the Chrome UI mimicking route like Firefox or Opera :)

  13. swamper April 6, 2016 at 5:03 pm #

    With a little javascript and css you can modify this browser UI to your liking. It is a browser aimed at power users/hackers. Folks that will dig around in the code a little might be surprised. There is a bunch of React.js and Material Design in there. Appears to be a bunch of node.js modules used to build it. I've been setting around for a couple years waiting for somebody to make this type of browser. Been a couple that tried and failed. Mozilla needs to take lessons.

    I installed it and about 24 hrs later I had it set up as my default. I've been using it a little over a month. There are some things it won't do yet so I keep a backup browser around. Most Chrome extensions appear to work. If you want to change the UI you have to hack it yourself. It is technically a webapp so the UI and render engine are separate. I.E Chrome UI extensions don't, and won't ever, work. Vivaldi's UI is Vivaldi not Chrome. Extensions will come as it ages. An in browser email client is in the works too. It's young yet so there will be growing pains. I went through those pains with Firefox years ago so it doesn't bother me. I enjoy the ride to tell truth.

  14. chesscanoe April 6, 2016 at 6:02 pm #

    As a Chrome default user under Win10x64, I've been playing with Vivaldi 1.0 for a few hours and so far I like it. My idea is not to make it like Chrome per se, but to try Settings variations to maximize the value of Vivaldi to me. I don't care much about resources; I have 8 gig of memory and an SSD drive. I do care about perceived speed and function, and thanks to Ghacks review I have more to learn about this browser. It's fun to see how a fresh development vision can make me smile in appreciation for what they've accomplished so far.

  15. Andrew April 6, 2016 at 6:24 pm #

    Wooot! I have been following Vivaldi and playing around with it. Now that it's stable, time to try it out as a main browser.

  16. ddk April 6, 2016 at 7:56 pm #

    Not too bad so far, had trouble finding the addon/extension button but it seems you have to type the location in the URL.
    Happy to see there's a portable version, hoping cookies, trackers & other unwanted elements stay contained rather than ending up all over the place on the OS or registry.

    For added security, I run portable browsers on a ram drive, when the computer shuts down, the browsing session is deleted. It's easy to run a batch file and add a new copy of the browser to the VHD, that way you have a clean session if the original copy has browsing history erased. The main advantage of VD's are running everything in memory and browsing speed.

  17. chesscanoe April 6, 2016 at 8:29 pm #

    Any ideas why Vivaldi and Chrome show 2 thin vertical lines when viewing today's
    http://www.atoptics.co.uk/opod.htm but Edge, IE11, and Firefox do not?

    • flyli5411 April 6, 2016 at 10:08 pm #

      have chrome no lines shown

    • Khidreal April 7, 2016 at 8:50 am #

      every browser renders the page as if was programmed to do. you can't expect that every browser shows you the page with the same elements on the same position. each browser has it's own engine. it's like a car: you can have 2 Audi A4, but one has a 420 horse power engine, the other has a 220 horse power engine. despite being the same model and the same look, the engine is different which makes them have different performance. with browsers it works that way too.

    • chesscanoe April 26, 2016 at 1:43 pm #

      After playing with Settings in latest Chrome and Vivaldi, I found the best combinations of settings that display pages in the large size I need, but at the same time eliminate the internal round off errors that resulted my the previously referenced vertical lines.

  18. Zin April 6, 2016 at 10:04 pm #

    An awful 1st release in my opinion, i'll share the reasons below:

    I ALWAYS follow the release of every single snapshot and i read the comments regarding them and i could say several things:

    1 - several ppl reported problems with extensions several times and they didnt care to fix most of these problems.

    2 - there were several requests to optimize the GUI because it's somewhat slow and they didnt do it.

    3 - there were several reports of huge use of the CPU/GPU/RAM which is a REAL annoyance and nothing was done about it.

    4 - no support reported for php 7.

    5 - a lot of features from Opera 12 that the users expected to see (and that was the main reason they went to vivaldi) werent implemented (a survey was made about it) which only adds to frustation, instead they cared to add a few features that most of ppl didnt ask for, they should focus on what ppl want the most what would raise the browser's popularity and they didnt.

    6 - several requests about a portable version and nothing happened.

    7 - you cant add or remove the buttons in the address bar, toolbar or tab bar like we could on Opera 12, the interface is cluttered with things i dont wanna see.

    8 - the lack of support for the native GUI of windows (i really wish this could be changed and i believe i'm not the only one who wants that).

    9 - several problems with sites containing videos were reported and compared to other browsers vivaldi does a bad job in viewing them.

    There is no link in the news but for those who'd like to know the link to source code is here https://vivaldi.com/source/

    • Martin Brinkmann April 6, 2016 at 10:09 pm #

      1) They will work on that.
      2) Yes, that is a problem, at least when it comes to Settings.
      3) Yes, but it will get better, I'm pretty sure about that.
      5) You cannot really expect them to deliver a 1:1 copy of Opera with version 1. The team is rather small. I'm sure more stuff gets added in the future.
      6) You can install a standalone edition that seems to be portable then.
      7) Yes that is true. I'd love options to remove some of the elements or move them.
      8) You can enable "use native window" under Settings > Appearance, is that what you mean?

      I think, all in all, this is a good release for version 1.0. I have seen worse. Remember Opera's first "Next Opera" version? It lacked a ton of features.

      • Khidreal April 7, 2016 at 8:45 am #

        Agreed Martin. they are a small team and people are asking too much from them. this out of beta version is 5 stars for me.
        when building a browser you can't just put what people want, you need to evaluate, for example, the feature on 7 for me is useless. I mean, when building a program, you can't put everything people want there, even if it's a huge portion of people asking for it because it's just not a question of features or people agreement/pleasure, it's a question of more bugs (probably ones that will just be like a brick wall and crash your vivaldi - making users abandon it), more resource usage... more bloatware in my opinion. as simple as better: less bugs, less resource usage...
        in no time there are 100 or 500 guys saying: "oh let's introduce a floating side bar" and than the devs do it, but at what price? more bugs? no thank you. you can put it on the right, the left and even hide it. (this would be what I would say if I was the dev and some1 asked for that feature).

        4- I think that they just could have missed to add that to the release notes. it's common, I mean, with the excitement of releasing a stable version and all that...
        6- portable versions... for me they are useless. with a portable version you can't make vivaldi your default browser for example. are people planning to use it on the flash drive? use it everywhere? please... on your work you can just ask your boss or something if you can install a new browser on your company computer (assuming you work in a office and you have your own computer there). every computer has a browser, even if it's IE. I don't think that even 25% of the vivaldi users would use the portable version, otherwise google.com would just have a portable version of chrome. every chrome portable are fan-made. AFAIK google never did a portable version, and chrome is being out there for ages...

    • Lestat April 7, 2016 at 8:14 am #

      You can remove almost all elements you do not want to see. With the help of CSS. You can basically re-arrange the whole UI the way YOU want to have it :)

  19. flyli5411 April 6, 2016 at 10:11 pm #

    Tried for a while ,Think il give it few months before giving another try
    slow as pssss, many problems ...

    • Khidreal April 7, 2016 at 8:00 am #

      I don't know what problems are you talking about. even when BETA 6 months ago was already stable as hell!
      this final version is even more stable. been using this final version for 4 hours and NEVER experienced a bug, not even a simple one... yeah it's a little bit slower than chrome, but it's not as slow as IE LOL. it's just what? 1 second slower than chrome? that is nothing for a browser that came just out of beta. look at midori, a simple browser (created for linux that now exists for windows too). midori is as light as possible yet needs like 5 more seconds than chrome or firefox to start and needs more 2 seconds to load a page... this browser is 5 stars xd. yet, if you think it needs to be more mature, who am I to judge you? xd

    • Zin April 7, 2016 at 7:46 pm #

      a most wise decision flyli5411 ;)

  20. Ken Saunders April 7, 2016 at 2:17 am #

    "it is in my humble opinion the browser that I'm most excited about"

    I would be too if it were open source (there were calls for it to be https://vivaldi.net/forum/vivaldi-browser/828-please-open-source-this-vivaldi).
    I tried it a few months ago and I was surprised by how much I liked it.
    I'll check it out again and please keep providing updates on its progress.

    I'm flattered by the fact that they took my concept and integrated it as a default feature.
    https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/addon/theme-font-size-changer (that page and the images needs updating)
    I remain humble and I will not charge for autographs. :)

    • Derp de doo April 8, 2016 at 4:47 am #

      can i take my picture with you? You are the one guy i would let my wife sleep with.You are a legend.

    • micro April 8, 2016 at 9:51 am #

      I think this is the source code
      https://vivaldi.com/source/

  21. Victor555 April 7, 2016 at 10:04 am #

    The browser is fast and pretty slick. But I have a big issue with it: the text is blurry/fuzzy. On every page, and tabs, menus, etc.
    It seems this has been a known issue since beta, but is still not fixed.

    • Ficho April 7, 2016 at 10:42 am #

      It is a known issue with Chromium browsers.
      You can adjust fonts (only on websites) with Font Rendering Enhancer extension
      from Chrome Web Store.

      • Victor555 April 7, 2016 at 11:42 am #

        I know there are "workarounds" for this issue. But even if I could fix this, I doubt someone that is less tech-savy or interested in going through forums and troubleshooting just to make a browser "work as it should" would take the time. This makes it hard to recommend it to people i know if i have to send with the download file a readme with instructions on how to "fix" all its issues before using it daily...

  22. mmm April 7, 2016 at 12:42 pm #

    I miss Presto engine....

    The author of Vivaldi is former Opera employee....
    Why doesn't he revive Presto?

    • Dan82 April 7, 2016 at 2:06 pm #

      For a number of reasons. Presto was closed-source and is the intellectual property of Opera, which is, if speculation becomes fact, about to be sold to a conglomerate of Chinese companies. Jon von Tetzchner, who was the former CEO of Opera, only has a small team to develop the new Vivaldi browser. Even if they, against all expectations, managed to create a brand-new browser engine or managed to recreate Presto in all its glory, they would soon fall behind, because the engine maintenance is a lot of work for very little reward. It's a lot cheaper to become another cog in the machine that maintains Blink/WebKit and concentrate all available resources on the usability and thus on the interface between engine and user, because that's where most other Chromium-based browsers fail.

      • katie October 25, 2016 at 4:55 pm #

        they fail in performance too, at least compared to Opera 12.
        chrome sucks out all the cpu time when playing youtube videos and doing ridiculously simple animatinos, Opera didn't do that.
        right now there is no sane browser on the market. they all suck ass

    • micro April 8, 2016 at 9:53 am #

      I don't know why people liked Presto, It always gives different webpage look from Gecko and Blink.
      I always need to make alteration just for Presto, luckily it's no more now.

  23. Rick April 7, 2016 at 9:46 pm #

    I feel the need to mention that Opera doesn't exactly "support Google Chrome Extensions," at least on its own. It only supports its own minuscule extension store. To gain access to Google's, you need to install an extension provided by a mysterious entity who goes by the name of "theprovider."

    I wish I was making that up, but that's Opera being Opera. Opera also doesn't support a Home button. That's right, a home button. But there's an extension for that. Sigh.

  24. hyperium April 8, 2016 at 12:16 am #

    Lol... Please stop HYPING this browser, even though it's dev's are from Opera..... It's core engine isn't PRESTO w/c they created but Google/Chrome/Blink where they are just saddling along. It lacks a lot of functionality that is/were only possible in PRESTO atleast Firefox(Gecko currently) can be customized to work closely like Opera Presto. I can't even move the extension icons or remove the darn home button atleast other chromeclones made it possible like Centbrowser/Slimjet w/c is far better imo by the least since they didnt remove important functions but added and tweaked it, This browser even removed the important CONTENT SETTINGS/DISABLE HARDWARE/RUN IN BACKGROUND check marks/implemented this ANNOYING TAB RECYCLING/REFRESHING(note: the flags doesn't work even if disabled). Other chrome clones even Opera(chrome) atleast disabled this by default.

    Well I'm just testing this browser for the quirks or people seems to hype it in some forums about internet stuffs that I frequent. But meh, it's far from becoming my main browser and it can never replace/make it function like Opera(PRESTO).

  25. chesscanoe April 8, 2016 at 12:35 pm #

    Nice to see Vivaldi as well as IE11, Edge, Firefox, and Chrome all automatically have the latest Flash update under Windows 10 x64 stable.

    • chesscanoe April 12, 2016 at 8:15 pm #

      Ditto - after updates today all 4 browsers are at Flash 21,0,0,213 .

  26. meifter April 9, 2016 at 12:24 pm #

    After using firefox for a decade or more I made the switch to vivaldi, i cannot believe that mozilla have taken what was a fast, powerful and customization dream with minimal resource demands and turned it into what is the total opposite.

    Good bye mozilla and good riddance, i hope you one day wake up to find your bubble burst that surrounds you guys when you have a developer discussion in a cozy air conditioned office.

  27. Martin April 13, 2016 at 2:13 am #

    The bookmarks do not work at all for some reason:
    1. Dragging does not add any bookmark
    2. Adding a bookmark via the icon on the right of the address bar, does nothing. Nothing is added
    3. Using "Add active tab" to a folder in the bookmark bar does nothing
    4. Some of the bookmarks in the folder that is in the bookmarks bar do not respond. Selecting them does nothing. have to go to the left bookmarks panel and double-click on the link.
    5. After I restarted the browser, I found some bookmarks in the proper folder some random on the toolbar.

    I don't know what is going on but this is a mess. Does not even come close to Opera. The browser is fast and I like it, would like to use it as my default browser but adding a bookmark is simply a nightmare. I guess I am doing something wrong but I read and tried everything.

    • charlieB April 25, 2016 at 6:44 pm #

      I experience none of those problems. Bookmarks work just fine here.

  28. Martin April 13, 2016 at 2:18 am #

    Extensions cannot be added. As described in the article I tried to add an extension. Clicked "Add' nothing happens. Nothing is added

    Rightclicking on a bookmark that is in the bar provides a menu from which the bookmark can be deleted. Rightclicking on a bookmark that is in a folder activates the link instead of a pop up menu options.

    Not ready for the prime time..I am afraid.

  29. Niefer April 13, 2016 at 3:53 pm #

    Vivaldi is my primary browser for a year now. I added some opera and chrome extensions (about 7-8). Still there are some problems with some formats of online video. A bit slow. And some other flaws, but nevertheless i don't think about another browser, it resembles the old Opera so much.

    Even it is not truly portable (just "standalone"), it is much better then other browsers, either chromium-based or not.

  30. DT April 13, 2016 at 6:09 pm #

    Have been using Vivaldi since the first week it was mentioned on this site, over a year now. Previously I had been an Opera user for many years but grew tired of it's compatibility issues with the "Presto" engine and Opera's un-willingness to fix them while just relying on blaming poor website coding. As a user I don't want to hear that, sounds like an excuse, not a solution. I've had none of that with Vivaldi. I've also tried other browsers but now use Vivaldi as my solo default browser which is something I could never do with Opera. The only real problem I've had, interestingly, it happened since the first official release, is that it has stopped being able to able backup/reverse with my local library site. I'm sure they will likely fix that sometime in the near future. Otherwise it's been a great experience.

  31. Martin April 13, 2016 at 7:34 pm #

    Thank you for the replies. I reinstalled the browser and the bookmarks are mostly working, although I still find the bookmarks aspect 'chaotic'. I did switch to Vivaldi to be my default browser. I like the customization and especially the ability to quickly increase the font size via slider in the status bar. Also to increase the tab/menu font size.

  32. Ken Saunders April 14, 2016 at 3:17 am #

    Ok, I give up.
    I've searched and cannot find Vivaldi's -software- privacy policy.
    There's this here > https://vivaldi.com/privacy/, but, "We strictly protect the security of your personal information within Vivaldi’s Web sites".
    What about the browser?
    I did not install Vivaldi, I unpacked it and ran it but I also cannot find their terms of use, EULA, etc.

    Martin, will you please provide some info here or better yet, write an article about Vivaldi's (Vivaldi Technologies) privacy policies, and maybe how it compares to Mozilla's, Google's etc, if, you can find the info to do so.

  33. Ken Saunders April 15, 2016 at 8:20 am #

    Found the following via aNooBies here on Ghacks.
    https://www.reddit.com/r/vivaldibrowser/comments/3s95va/vivaldirocks_search_partnership/

    And the EULA through the link above.
    vivaldi://terms

    And the vodka via my freezer.

    Still, not enough info for me personally.

  34. Ronald Jones May 2, 2016 at 3:30 am #

    I have used Vivaldi's while in beta and now (v1.1.453.47) and overall like the experience but found one problem still present while watching YouTube videos. If you go full screen to watch the video but try to use the ESC key to minimize the browser hangs causing you to reload (close and re opened) the browser to continue browsing or watching the video. I am an old Opera Browser user and really like the customization features, but feel this is following the same tracks as the original Opera browser early releases that took years for the feature set to fully develop and establish itself as ready for prime time.

  35. Goal.com showing up August 14, 2016 at 1:50 am #

    Whenever I try to type Google.com on Vivaldi it seems to try to show Goal.com a strange sports site I don't know what it's about.

    Why is it doing this? Other websites are that way too when I type on the address bar sites show up I don't want it too.

    PLEASE fix this! I use Chrome now for Google as it's the only one *ironicly* that still works. Chrome is pretty much a monopoly.

    I'll use Vivaldi more when it has it's bugs/kinks worked out and stick to Chrome meanwhile.

    Above all else I don't support FireFox anymore since the owner was fired when he said his personal views of Gay Marriage which he was wrongfully fired for.

    A whole bunch of people even Muslims all dropped Fire Fox when it happened and FF went downhill ever since in terms of function and ease.

  36. cmaglaughlin September 30, 2016 at 5:27 am #

    Firefox gets my vote. Never let me down, yet. "Downhill" is faster than UP-HILL.

  37. katie October 25, 2016 at 4:51 pm #

    just another Chrome skin. Nothing to see here. Move along...

  38. pete dodds March 9, 2017 at 5:02 pm #

    vivaldi web browse. have been playing around with it ,and customizing it to my taste . for me its fast but did go under the hood into chrome-flags to get a bit more snap out of it,but did that with chrome too. i can see me using vivaldi long term. just added a few privacy apps from the chrome store. so hopefully thats sorted out sites tracking i use vpn software its becoming the norm these days. i have 64bit version with windows 10 pro. using all so intel 600p m2 nvme ssd. so very happy thanks vivaldi people great web browser.

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