Vine announces ban of porn on network

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I never really understood the fascination with services that limits you in one way or the other. Vine is such as service. It lets you create short looping videos that are then published on your Vine profile or kept private on your device.

People who follow you are informed automatically about new videos, so that they can watch them whenever you happen to create a new one.

Vine does offer privacy controls when it comes to videos, so that only select followers may watch a video for instance.

The company announced today that it has made a change to its content boundaries and use of vine policy. The new policy bans porn and sexually explicit content on the network.

According to Vine,, about 1% of all users are affected by the policy change, while 99% of all users may not notice any difference to before.

vine bans porn policy vine sensitive content

The FAQ provides examples of posts that are allowed and posts that are now. Included in the not allowed section are provocative nudity, sexually graphic art or animation such as hentai, or the use of sex toys.

Allowed are nudity in a documentary or artistic context, nudity that is not sexually provocative, and clothed sexually suggestive dancing.

If a Vine user violates the policy, the account may be suspended by the site's administration. The suspended user then has to remove all violating posts from his account before the account can be restored.

Appeals can be submitted via this form.

Before the ban, there were only a few possibilities to be exposed to porn on Vine. The famous editing error that put a Dildoplay vine on the frontpage for instance, and through the all posts section, and of course through people that you follow on the network.

Vine has a sensitive posts setting that content creators can use to mark all of their posts as sensitive. There are also tags that can indicate that, for instance #nsfw.

It is not clear how long Vine users have to remove explicit contents from their channels before Vine will enforce the new policy. Right now, adult contents are still available on the network.

According to ZDnet, in-app notifications were sent out to Vine users who have been identified as explicit content producers on the network. The notified users appear to have a one week grace period to remove offending contents to avoid account suspension.

The situation feels awfully similar to Yahoo's attempt to put adult blogs on Tumblr on the back seat last year when the company removed these blogs from search. A serious backslash on the new policy however made Yahoo rethink the change and restore the status quo again.

Exporting Vine videos

vine-download

You can download any video that you have published on Vine on the website directly using Google Chrome and maybe other browsers as well (Firefox does not work).

  1. Open the Vine website and sign in to your account.
  2. I suggest you click on your username on the feed to only see your videos here.
  3. Right-click on any video and select the save video as option to download it to your computer.

If you use Firefox, use the excellent Download Helper add-on to download your videos instead.

Vine users who want to save their unpublished videos to another location before they delete them on the network or close their account can do so in the following way.

Note: I can only demonstrate how this works on Android and not iOS or Windows Phone.

  1. Connect your Android phone to your computer.
  2. Browse to \Internal storage\Android\data\co.vine.android\files\drafts\
  3. Here you find listed mp4 files that you download to your system.

You can alternatively use an app such as ES File Explorer to move the mp4 files to another location on your phone.

Have a tip on how to speed up the downloading further? Or want to comment on the new policy? Feel free to post a comment below.

Now Read: Discover what people post on Vine

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Responses to Vine announces ban of porn on network

  1. Paul(us) March 7, 2014 at 10:18 am #

    But why do they mean its prudent that we do not can use porn any more?
    We are getting prudish-er by the minute and moving more and more away from the sixties.

    Just a few days ago the European parliament has decided that its not allowed any more
    for grown man to go to prostitutes any more. Things are getting crazier by the minute.
    Personally I am convinced that its not a good development.
    Not only because like in the old days rape will go up!

    • Chains The Bounty Hunter March 7, 2014 at 3:19 pm #

      It's not that you can't use porn anymore (I suspect that's just a weird grasp of English there) and more the fact that they no doubt realize the massive potential for abuse if they allowed this to continue (I wouldn't be surprised to find that they happened upon something illegal or at least approaching the borderlines of it that would put them in a legal predicament).

      I think this largely impacts, at least from the general public, porn stars who use the service to post their clips on their Twitter accounts. The upside is that much like the porn industry, the internet is resilient enough that there will undoubtedly be a means to post nothing but pornographic Vine-like videos soon enough.

    • Blue March 7, 2014 at 8:18 pm #

      Lol... come to Canada... prostitution is LEGAL... and they recently reformed the laws in a weird way, but basically you can be paid for sex, but you can't advertise/solicitate it, nor can you make money from others having sex lol... Yeah Canadian laws is just as screwed up...

  2. Anders March 7, 2014 at 12:14 pm #

    Time for an alternative service, Red Vine maybe? :D

    • Chains The Bounty Hunter March 8, 2014 at 4:34 am #

      Probably being worked on by someone, somewhere.

      Beyond the legal issues they could face, pressure from investors and advertisers were likely a driving force behind Vine doing a sweep and blanket ban of all the porn on it. Without that inflow of cash it'd be nothing (until it resorted to adult advertising, which would in turn lead to most people wanting to avoid it for other reasons anyway).

  3. Sukhen March 7, 2014 at 5:43 pm #

    This is an unnecessary and impractical step. There will be bound to be ways to fight it out today or tomorrow. Ban!!! - does it work? Anders pointed it right.

  4. Gregg DesElms March 8, 2014 at 12:57 am #

    I could not more stongly support Vine's decision.

    __________________________________
    Gregg L. DesElms
    Napa, California USA
    gregg at greggdeselms dot com

    Veritas nihil veretur nisi abscondi.
    Veritas nimium altercando amittitur.

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